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Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking. Suggestions from educators at KIPP King Collegiate High School on how to help develop and assess critical-thinking skills in your students.

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking

Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some concrete ways you can begin leveraging your students' critical-thinking skills in the classroom and beyond. 1. Questions, questions, questions. Questioning is at the heart of critical thinking, so you want to create an environment where intellectual curiosity is fostered and questions are encouraged. In the beginning stages, you may be doing most of the asking to show your students the types of questions that will lead to higher-level thinking and understanding. Negotiation Skills: Giving Feedback. Who Needs It? It Might Be You.

InShare16 A Q&A with Sheila Heen, co-author (with Douglas Stone) of the new book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well.

Negotiation Skills: Giving Feedback. Who Needs It? It Might Be You

We recently interviewed Sheila Heen, lecturer at Harvard Law School, PON Faculty member, and Partner at Triad Consulting Group, about her new book with Douglas Stone, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered, and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood). Heen and Stone are co-authors, along with Bruce Patton, of the New York Times Business Bestseller Difficult Conversations.

They have teamed up again to share their insights about what helps people learn and what gets in their way. 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students. My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. How to Ignite Intellectual Curiosity in Students. I personally have never seen a student that was not curious about something.

How to Ignite Intellectual Curiosity in Students

I have seen many students who have suppressed their curiosity when they enter school to such an extent as to be nearly undetectable, but it is still there. Human beings are hardwired to be curious and being curious is a major activity of childhood and young adulthood (and yet recently more and more students would rather be curious-looking).

Mix It Up a Little So if we notice students are not curious in our classes, then we should first look at what we are doing, or not doing, that might cause this to happen. Of course I have some suggestions of places to inspect first. Twitter Cheat Sheet {12 Days: Tool 4} Twitter for Educators Twitter, the popular social media platform, is continually picking up momentum in its number of users; however, I find many educators who are not tapping into the power of Twitter.

Twitter Cheat Sheet {12 Days: Tool 4}

The mystery that surrounds Twitter, I believe, keeps many people from benefiting from the potential it holds. Consider this recent post on Facebook from a friend who revealed, “My mom thought that hashtags were code messages.” While the post made me chuckle, to those who don’t use Twitter, terms like tweets, retweets, and hashtags, can seem pretty foreign and intimidating. For those just getting started, I’ll explain a few basic terms to help you easily and quickly navigate your way around Twitter. Twitter: The Basics available so that became my username. Benefits for Educators A Word to the Wise. Time Management: Planning for the Adventure. Image credit: iStockphoto. Addressing Our Needs: Maslow Comes to Life for Educators and Students.

In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs.

Addressing Our Needs: Maslow Comes to Life for Educators and Students

As a parent and educator, I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in our classrooms. After studying it over the past couple of years, my graduate and undergraduate students have decided that every classroom should display a wall-sized diagram of the pyramid, as students and teachers alike place pins and post-its on the varying tiers based on their own feelings, behaviors and needs. What do actual brain-compatible strategies look like on this pyramid? Tier One Meeting Physiological Needs in the Classroom These elements contribute to brain-compatible learning by creating a physical environment that is inviting, warm and friendly!

Questions to Ask Myself. Curiosity killed by class? When you become a father you get used to being asked endless questions about the intricacies of our complex world.

Curiosity killed by class?

The road is paved with unending questions. Why does this…? Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen. Ah, listening, the neglected literacy skill.

Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen

I know when I was a high school English teacher this was not necessarily a primary focus; I was too busy honing the more measurable literacy skills -- reading, writing, and speaking. But when we think about career and college readiness, listening skills are just as important. This is evidenced by the listening standards found in the Common Core and also the integral role listening plays in collaboration and communication, two of the four Cs of 21st century learning. So how do we help kids become better listeners? Check out these tactics for encouraging a deeper level of listening that also include student accountability: Strategy #1: Say it Once Repeating ourselves in the classroom will produce lazy listening in our students.

Teachers TV - Schools. Finland’s Formula for School Success (Education Everywhere Series) Pasi: If you look at the 15-year-olds, or 16-year-old Finns who are leaving the basic school, most of them have been in special education throughout their schooling.

Finland’s Formula for School Success (Education Everywhere Series)

Which means that special education is actually nothing special. So it's you are a special child or student if you haven't been, if you haven't ever used special services. Pasi: We are putting a lot of emphasis on the early detection of any difficulties and problems that the students in our schools may have. And this is a very different policy to many other countries where these measures are designed in a way that they are implemented only when the problems have emerged and are too visible. But we don’t' think like this in Finland. Teacher: [speaking Finnish] Two times two times two, how is this value notated? Student: [speaking Finnish] Two to the power of three. Olli: We as subject teachers cooperate with the special teacher in cases where we see that an individual student has problems with their studies.

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting. Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates.

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting

I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least. Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation. It's not enough for students to simply pay attention -- they need to be active participants to generate one of those great discussions that end far too quickly for both the teacher and students.

The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. 1. Just the name "lightning round" suggests energy. 2. When you ask a discussion question, call on students by letting them catch a ball.