background preloader

10 Apps For More Organized Project-Based Learning

10 Apps For More Organized Project-Based Learning
Project-Based Learning, by definition, is flexible. It encourages learner-centeredness, provides the possibility of more authentic work, and allows learners to self-manage and self-direct in places they used to have their hands held. But this has its drawbacks. Learning is a capacity-building endeavor that seeks to, well, build capacity will ironically depending on that same capacity to progress, There are a variety of ways to support students in project-based learning, including organized digital learning spaces that support creative thinking, collaboration, and ultimately project management. Below are 10 apps for more organized project-based learning. 1. Platform: iOS How It Can Help: Pure overkill for most classrooms, but if an extremely powerful productivity and project management is what you need and you’ve got a $50 iTunes card burning a hole in your pocket, this could be just what the doctor ordered. 2. Platform: iOS 3. Platform: Android & iOS How It Can Help: 4. Platform: iOS 5. 6. 7.

http://www.teachthought.com/apps-2/10-apps-for-more-organized-project-based-learning/

Related:  Project & Problem based LearningPBL 2

A World of Project Ideas (You Can Steal) One of the advantages of project-based learning is the flexibility. PBL is an effective instructional strategy within individual content areas as well as across disciplines. It's engaging for young learners and teens alike. Good projects can be short term and tightly focused, or expansive enough to require months of inquiry. The sky's the limit -- which can be a challenge for teachers designing their first projects. Personalized PBL: Student-Designed Learning I wrote a blog about one of the pitfalls of personalization for the ASCD Whole Child Blog. Specifically, that pitfall is the lack of engagement. With all the focus on personalization through time, pacing, and place, it can be easy to forget about the importance of engagement. No matter where students learn, when they learn, and the timing of the learning, engagement drives them to learn. When we factor all the pieces of personalization together, we can truly meet students where they are and set them on a path of learning that truly meets their needs and desires. Project-based learning can be an effective engagement framework to engage students in personalized learning.

Project Based Learning: Don’t Start with a Question Do you have to start project-based learning (PBL) with a question? (Oh, wait a second! Am I starting this post with a question?) This is something many people ask. Turn Your Classroom into a Workshop to Engage Learners If you think a classroom bereft of traditional tools like homework, bell work, worksheets and even grades sounds intriguing, you are ready to convert your classroom into a workshop setting, where learning will really soar. Say Goodbye to Order Order means control. There is no room for control in a dynamic workshop setting. When I created my first Results Only Learning Environment, desks were gathered in small groups.

Using Entrepreneurship to Transform Student Work As my colleagues and I were building curriculum for our ninth grade project-based program, we found that most of our conversations centered not on potential projects themselves, but rather on building student self-motivation and self-mastery. We realized that our program's measure of success was whether the students learned to take charge of their own learning and find a joy in it. Beyond "Just Good Enough" What Does a Great School Year Look Like? Ask the Students Teaching Strategies Shelley Wright Shelley Wright's class constructed a complete Holocaust Museum as part of a school project.

Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights When my sixth grader Lyle asked if we could build a roller coaster in the backyard, I said yes -- for two reasons. First, as a dad, it's my job to help my kids do what they want to do. I believe that what kids want and what kids need are usually the same thing. So I've trained myself to listen to their ideas. I look for reasons to say yes, and I look for ways to engage and play with them. Hot Topics : Project Based Learning : Want more time for Project Based Learning in the Classroom? Flip it! The Flipped Classroom goes hand-in-hand with Project Based Learning. When you move some learning content delivery out of the classroom, you free up class time for whatever types of Active Learning you like your students to engage in. Project Based Learning is a powerful form of Active Learning. Teachers and other education thought leaders have shared their thinking about, and resources that focus on, the powerful potential of the flipped classroom and PBL in numerous articles and web tools. In Project Based Learning and Flipped Classrooms: There Really is a Connection …, Michael Gorman explains, “… as teachers combine the PBL and Flipped experience, they see learning spiral. This allows teachers the opportunity to bring the home learning experience up a notch.

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful By Thom Markham This is a crucial time for education. Every system in every country is in the process of figuring out how to reboot education to teach skills, application, and attitude in addition to recall and understanding. Create collaborative research projects with free tools School was once a place where teachers were the experts. They stood at the front of the classroom and transferred their knowledge to students in the form of step-by-step instructions and premade problems that were unrelated to real life. And the students' primary tasks were to memorize and follow directions. Once upon a time, this model worked. But that time is over. This research project is different.

Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited. In fact, I recommend that. Using formative tools to improve PBL outcomes In a high school art room, I watched a student working at an easel. When I asked about her progress, she explained that she was attempting to paint sunflowers in the style of Monet, her favorite artist. She told me she liked how the flowers were looking but said the vase was giving her trouble. She planned to keep reworking it, applying layers of acrylic until she got the play of light just the way she wanted. Then she laughed and said, “You should see what’s underneath!

Innovative program rethinks high school November 3, 2014 | By Michelle Maitre | 2 Comments No bells ring at this high school, and you won’t find monitors roaming the halls or restless students asking fitfully for permission to use the restroom. But you might find biotechnology students cloning carrots in the lab, or see public policy students researching ballot propositions in preparation for a community-wide town hall forum they’re organizing, or watch a group of budding computer scientists hunched over a computer monitor, creating a video game they’ve designed from scratch. “We think we are a special place,” said Rick Watson, chief executive officer at the Center for Advanced Research and Technology. The center is a public high school program located in the Central Valley city of Clovis, where about 1,400 students a year participate in half-day career-based courses featuring cutting-edge technology and equipment.

Related: