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BBC Radio 4 - The Film Programme, A tour of the British Isles in accents

BBC Radio 4 - The Film Programme, A tour of the British Isles in accents

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5

Related:  IELTSrisullyGreat BritainemilkovacGreat Britain

Sounds Familiar? What you can hear You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses. You can explore the links between present-day Geordie and our Anglo-Saxon and Viking past or discover why Northern Irish accents are a rich blend of seventeenth century English and Scots. You can study changes in pronunciation among the middle classes or find out how British Asians express their linguistic identity. What you can do

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I) “Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins? Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity.”—Herman Melville, Billy Budd Spectral Rhythm. British Royal Family Arms Royal Coat of Arms The main element of the Royal Arms is the shield which is divided into four quarters (see diagram). The three golden lions on a red background, symbolising England, occupy the first and fourth quarters. The Arms of Scotland, a red lion rearing on its hind legs inside a red border, are in the second quarter, and the Arms of Ireland's golden harp with silver strings on a blue background - are in the third quarter. The lion and the unicorn supporting the shield represent England and Scotland respectively. They stand on a small frame called the compartment which sometimes incorporates the plant emblems of Scotland (thistle), Ireland (shamrock) and England (rose).

69 Fun Facts about the UK With the Olympics currently going on and taking place in London, I think this has only fuelled everyone’s obsession with everything British – because really, everyone has at least one totally British thing they love (Whether it’s rock music, Harry Potter, the Royal Family, tea, soccer, culture, or the lovely British accent). So here’s 69 fun facts about the UK. Enjoy! 1. Big Ben does not refer to the clock, but actually the bell. 2.

Britain is GREAT The GREAT Britain campaign showcases the very best of what Britain has to offer. We welcome the world to visit, study and do business with the UK. Business The UK’s dynamic economy and business-friendly environment make it a great place to locate and expand your business. IELTS Skills Testing and English coaching INSTRUCTIONS: In this exercise you will get an opportunity to practise typing in numbers as you hear them dictated during a recorded lecture. Start the recording below and fill in the spaces with the numbers as they are spoken in the gaps provided below. Only use numbers and common numbered formats. For example, "2nd" would be marked as correct, but not "second". And don't forget to employ standard written usage and correct punctuation when formatting numbers large numbers. For example, "24.2 million" is correct, but not "twenty four point two million".

EWG's 2013 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ EWG's 2013 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ Eat fruits and vegetables! The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Great Britain: Every quirky fact you need to know Pom or Pommy: Used in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The origin is unknown, although the strongest theory is that it's a contraction of pomegranate which was Australian rhyming slang for immigrant. Sassenach: Used by the Scots and Irish to describe the English.

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