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S.O.S. for Information Literacy

http://www.informationliteracy.org/

Related:  The Extended Essay (IB DP)Cultivating Digital CitizenshipTeacher LibrarianILLibrary information and reference

Introducing “Freakonomics Experiments”: A New Marketplace Podcast RYSSDAL: Time now for a little Freakonomics Radio. It’s that moment every couple of weeks we talk to the coauthors of the book and the blog of the same name. It is the hidden side of everything, of course. And today it is the brains if you will of the operation, Steven Levitt, professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Be Safe while Surfing Online - Learn How to Protect Yourself There are many precautions you can take as a child, teen or young adult while surfing the Internet. First, ALWAYS remember that you should NEVER give ANY personal information out about yourself unless you are with an adult, and they approve. While not all sites or individuals that collect information from children are illegal, it is better to be safe than sorry. It is also illegal to collect any personal information about children under the age of 13. This is called COPPA, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998. Perhaps one of the best pieces of advice that you've probably heard over and over, "don't talk to strangers" is good to remember when you're on the Internet.

Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School This post title is “Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School”, but this post is as much for adults and older students. Many adults are overwhelmed with the quantity and new kind of media that is available and accessible through technology. Older students in High School and College might not feel overwhelmed, but have never been taught how to navigate, evaluate, save and retrieve the information that they are seeking. How and what kind of information skills do we need to start teaching in elementary school, that will grow and expand with our students as their grow older?

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship 10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship Added by Jeff Dunn on 2012-07-22 YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Information Literacy for K-16 Settings Information Literacy for K-16 Settings Purpose of this Site: Today's educators and K-12 students need to be information literate: to be able to locate, evaluate, use and share information. notes several specific reasons for students to be information literate: * So they can successfully navigate through proliferating information resources

The Socratic Method The Socratic Method:Teaching by Asking Instead of by Tellingby Rick Garlikov The following is a transcript of a teaching experiment, using the Socratic method, with a regular third grade class in a suburban elementary school. I present my perspective and views on the session, and on the Socratic method as a teaching tool, following the transcript. The class was conducted on a Friday afternoon beginning at 1:30, late in May, with about two weeks left in the school year. Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Working toward equal digital rights and supporting electronic access is the starting point of Digital Citizenship.

School Librarians Explore Their Role as Education Leaders By Shelley Diaz, Kiera Parrott, Karyn M. Peterson, and Chelsey Philpot on November 19, 2013 Several thousand school library professionals from around the country converged in Hartford, CT, November 14–17 for the 16th National Conference of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL). During the event—themed “Rising to the Challenge”—media specialists explored their evolving and expanding role as education and technology leaders through such shared learning activities as concurrent sessions; an intense, late-night “unconference,” in which the informal discussion topics were chosen by the participants; and an elearning commons that offered continuous how-to learning.

6 Great Videos on Teaching Critical Thinking Critical thinking is a skill that we can teach to our students through exercise and practice. It is particularly a skill that contains a plethora of other skills inside it. Critical thinking in its basic definition refers" to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with evaluating information as well as evaluating our thought in a disciplined way ". All of our students think in a way or another but the question is , do they really think critically ? Identifying Reliable Sources and Citing Them This may not sound like the most exciting topic for a post, but I can assure you that it is a critical one. If your students complete ANY research online at all, then you will be interested in how I collaborated with our librarian to teach my students to identify reliable resources and to properly credit them. After helping my 1st grade son create a poster for school last year that required online research, I know this information is applicable to grades 1–12. I have also included sources that help students create grade-appropriate citations.

The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Le One of the reasons that instructors tend to overemphasize "coverage" over "engaged thinking" is that they assume that answers can be taught separate from questions. Indeed, so buried are questions in established instruction that the fact that all assertions — all statements that this or that is so — are implicit answers to questions is virtually never recognized. For example, the statement that water boils at 100 degrees centigrade is an answer to the question "At what temperature centigrade does water boil?"

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