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SAMR in 120 Seconds

SAMR in 120 Seconds
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Related:  Digital Tech

Ways of thinking – embedding the digital technologies curriculum ‘Teachers do need to become very familiar with the content, and also to understand that for this curriculum, Digi Tech, at least probably 50 per cent of the curriculum focuses on developing types of thinking skills which support problem solving and the use of digital systems,’ – Paula Christophersen. What challenges are teachers likely to face when implementing the new digital technologies curriculum? At a recent workshop hosted by the Digital Education Research Network (DERN), Teacher caught up with Paula Christophersen, Digital Technologies Curriculum Manager at the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA). Here, she discusses what teachers need to know to develop programs that cover the curriculum, the types of thinking addressed in the curriculum and the resources that are needed to implement it successfully. What activities do you use to help students develop abstract thinking and algorithmic thinking?

10 Tips for Getting Started With Edmodo This is a guest post from Vance Kite, a science teacher at City of Medicine Academy in Durham, North Carolina. If you are interested in contributing to the Edmodo Blog, please complete this form. Introduce yourself to Vance or follow him on Twitter at @Lab_207 Practice Tests The Spring 2014 release consisted of Performance-Based Assessment tests in English Language Arts/Literacy and End-of-Year tests in mathematics. What's available: Grades 3–11 Performance-Based Assessment tests for ELA Grades 3–8 End-of-Year tests for mathematics Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II End-of-Year tests for mathematics Notes about scoring:

New Padagogy Wheel Helps You Integrate Technology Using SAMR Model Sometimes a visual guide comes along and it just makes total sense. That’s how I felt about Allan Carrington’s clever ‘Padagogy Wheel‘ which we featured on Edudemic last week. Check out the previous version then view the one below to see the differences. From what I can tell, putting the wheel on this site has generated a bit of buzz and I’m glad we could help spread the knowledge. But I was quite amazed this morning when I saw that the Padagogy Wheel had been updated. Now at version 2.0, it features another band around the edge focusing on the SAMR Model and on helping teachers (and admins) effectively integrate education technology.

Teach with digital technologies Page Content Digital technologies are electronic tools, systems, devices and resources that generate, store or process data. Well known examples include social media, online games, multimedia and mobile phones. Creativity on the Run: 18 Apps that Support the Creative Process "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." - Albert Einstein We do not need to teach creativity, but rather inspire its daily practice. Somewhere along the way, we simply forgot to honor this innate gift and how to access its power. Our role as educators is to encourage learning experiences that increase the ability to recognize and listen to our inner voice.

I’ve Got Research. Yes, I Do. I’ve Got Research. How About You? In 1847, Hungarian doctor, Ignaz Semmelweis made a remarkable discovery. When doctors washed their hands in a solution of chlorine and water, childbirth fever rates at Vienna General Hospital dropped from 18% to near zero. Offended that Semmelweis implied doctors were killing their own patients, the medical community rejected hand washing as an infection prevention measure, and drove Semmelweis out of medicine and into an insane asylum. A few years later, Louis Pasteur and Joseph Lister made scientific advances that reinforced Semmelwies’s claims about germ theory and infection. Hand washing between patient examinations is considered best practice today.

10 ways to reach SAMR’s redefinition level Redefinition is at the top of the SAMR model, and most educators want to know how the can reach it. Here are several ideas for redefining learning with technology. (Image via Dr. Ruben Puentedura via hippasus.com) Technology in the Classroom in 2019: 6 Pros & Cons Technology in education is the biggest change in teaching we will ever see. For years, policy makers, teachers, parents and students alike have been weighing the potential benefits of technology in education against its risks and consequences. But now the debate is more pressing than ever, as curricula increasingly incorporate technology and professors experiment with new teaching methods. On one hand, technology allows you to experiment in pedagogy, democratize the classroom and better engage students. On the other hand, some argue technology in the classroom can be distracting and even foster cheating. What does it mean to use technology in the classroom?

Common Core requires publishing. Technology makes that happen There are a variety of overarching themes in Common Core–’integrate technology into classroom inquiry’, ‘encourage collaboration and sharing in student work’, ‘use technology to prepare students for college and career’. Each of these could take weeks to wrap into classwork, but there’s one organic tool that accomplishes all three of these while fulfilling a fourth recurring Common Core standard required at all grade levels: Publish student work. Look at this (credit: NGA Center and CCSSO: Curing the Reading GERM by Jim Bailey Four years ago I was ready to leave education. I loved my school, I loved my principal, I loved my colleagues, and most of all I loved my students. Unfortunately, I was infected with a GERM, as Pasi Sahlberg calls it, the Global Education Reform Movement. The obsession with high stakes testing, lack of autonomy in the classroom, and general standardization of education was forcing me to reevaluate my career path. I was most affected by this GERM in the area of teaching reading, if you could even call what I was doing teaching reading.

SAMR is not a ladder, a word of warning Published on May 26th, 2015 | by Mark Anderson I’m as guilty as the next person for singing the praises of Puentedura’s SAMR model. I’ve blogged about it many many times, it’s included in my book ‘Perfect ICT Every Lesson’ too. Quite rightly so I believe. The problem I have with it, and others find this problem too, is that it is seen as being a taxonomy, a ladder upon which to be climbed.

An Introduction to Technology Integration The thought ended almost before it started: “This is so overwhelming.” It was all one teacher managed to type before she stopped short, vexed into silence, perhaps, by the sheer size of the problem. In the pregnant pause that followed, undoubtedly, every teacher tracking the unspooling thread—about the dizzying, rapidly escalating viral crisis that was closing schools across the country—recognized the chasm they were all facing as well, and scrambled to fill in the blank. In the next few hours, over 500 teachers joined two Facebook conversations about teaching during the coronavirus pandemic, spilling out their concerns and anxieties: What will we do if the schools close for months? How can I shift to online learning if we’re closing tomorrow, or even in a few hours?

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