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7 Stories From Educators About Teaching In The Flipped Classroom

7 Stories From Educators About Teaching In The Flipped Classroom
Informed articles and commentary on this powerful and often misunderstood concept. The University of Wisconsin’s Stout School of Education publishes a great Tech Tips newsletter. The last few issues of this newsletter have been packed with resources focused on topics near and dear to us here at EmergingEdTech, and we strongly recommend signing up for this free publication. I spent a good deal of time reading and appreciating the resources shared in a recent Tech Tips newsletter focused on the concept of “the flipped classroom”. Below I have shared several of the articles listed in the newsletter, along with a few more that I searched out, and I’ve provided a little insight into each of them. (Click image to access a Flipped Classroom Infographic from Knewton.com) There is a wealth of experienced, constructive knowledge shared in this content. The Flipped Class: Myths Vs. About Kelly Walsh Print This Post

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Related:  Blended Learning

Blended learning solution in practice Blended learning is not only the buzz word. It is actually working. Why? Because we all realized that no single teaching approach is good enough to work for all learners. Since time immemorial we’ve been blending different instructional methods in our training initiatives. With the emergence of technology, this approach got new dimensions.

What’s the “problem” with MOOCs? « EdTechDev In case the quotes didn’t clue you in, this post doesn’t argue against massive open online courses (MOOCs) such as the ones offered by Udacity, Coursera, and edX. I think they are very worthy ventures and will serve to progress our system of higher education. I do however agree with some criticisms of these courses, and that there is room for much more progress. I propose an alternative model for such massive open online learning experiences, or MOOLEs, that focuses on solving “problems,” but first, here’s a sampling of some of the criticisms of MOOCs. Criticisms of MOOCs

Why Is the Research on Learning Styles Still Being Dismissed by Some Learning Leaders and Practitioners? I have been battling the notion of "designing instruction for learning styles" in my own quixotic fashion for a couple of decades now. In my attempt to be a good steward of my clients' shareholders' equity I wished to help them avoid faddish instructional design practices that have been disproven by empirical research. I first learned back in the 1980s at NSPI (now ISPI) conferences that while self-reported learning style preferences do exist, that designing instruction to accommodate them has no basis. When I posted yet again on this topic on my blog a couple of months ago and then sent a Tweet out about it—Jane Bozarth, EIC of this magazine, invited me to publish an article. I accepted and decided to reach out to the usual suspects, those in my professional crowd who know the research, for their inputs. As I am but a practitioner attempting to follow what I have learned over the years about the research, I am not steeped in that research and able to cite it, they can.

Student Engagement in a Flipped Classroom Engaging In Isolation: Student Engagement in a Flipped Classroom by Tridib Roy Chowdhury, Senior Director, Products, Adobe Systems This is part 2 of the series “Responsive Teaching For A Changing World,” a 3-part series is sponsored by Adobe Presenter 9. The Flipped Classroom model allows every student to learn at their own pace, with the rewind button of online content being used frequently as students navigate digital courses. Combined with the own-place, own-time nature of eLearning, this means students now consume content in a very asynchronous manner.

Flipped classrooms: Can they help students learn? Photo by Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Thinkstock This article is part of Future Tense, which is a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. On Wednesday, April 30, Future Tense will host an event in Washington, D.C., on technology and the future of higher education. 7 Essential Tools for a Flipped Classroom - Getting Smart by Guest Author - classrooms, EdTech, flipped classroom By: Erin Palmer The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. Innovative educators are usually on the lookout for the latest technology breakthroughs that will help them better organize and conduct flipped classrooms. The following tools are listed from most basic to most sophisticated and can be used alone or in tandem to make flipped classrooms more engaging.

Envisioning the Post-LMS Era: The Open Learning Network (EDUCAUSE Quarterly Key Takeaways Although central to the business of higher education, the LMS has also become a symbol of the status quo that supports administrative functions more effectively than teaching and learning activities. Personal learning environments offer an alternative, but with their own limitations. Teaching Critical Thinking: Are We Clear? November 30, 2011 By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog I’ve been thinking about critical thinking. I just finished reading Stephen Brookfield’s new book on the topic, Teaching for Critical Thinking.

Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture for Higher Education The Flipped Classroom, as most know, has become quite the buzz in education. Its use in higher education has been given a lot of press recently. The purpose of this post is to: Provide background for this model of learning with a focus on its use in higher education.Identify some problems with its use and implementation that if not addressed, could become just a fading fad.Propose a model for implementation based on an experiential cycle of learning model. Background About the Flipped Classroom

Three Questions to Consider Before We All Flip It seems like you can't open an education periodical these days without finding an article espousing the wonders of flipping the classroom. Like most initiatives in schools, flipping the classroom does have merit in the right situation. But also like most initiatives it's not a one-size-fits-all solution. Is K–12 blended learning disruptive?An introduction of the theory of hybrids Download the full white paper By Clayton M. Christensen, Michael B. Horn, and Heather Staker May 2013 Visitors and Residents: What Motivates Engagement with the Digital Information Environment? Building on research of individuals’ modes of engagement with the web (Visitors and Residents4), and the JISC-funded Digital Information Seeker report5, this project is exploring what motivates different types of engagement with the digital environment for learning. The investigation focuses on the sources learners turn to in order to gather information, and which ‘spaces’ (on and offline) they choose to interact in as part of the learning process. It is using the Visitors and Residents6 framework to map learner’s modes of engagement in both personal and institutional contexts.

Social constructivism Social constructivism is a sociological theory of knowledge that applies the general philosophical constructivism into social settings, wherein groups construct knowledge for one another, collaboratively creating a small culture of shared artifacts with shared meanings. When one is immersed within a culture of this sort, one is learning all the time about how to be a part of that culture on many levels. It is emphasised that culture plays a large role in the cognitive development of a person. Its origins are largely attributed to Lev Vygotsky. Social constructivism and social constructionism[edit] Social constructivism is closely related to social constructionism in the sense that people are working together to construct artifacts.

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