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No dig gardens

No dig gardens
No dig gardens are the quickest, easiest way to get home grown vegetables on your dinner table. No dig gardening or a raised garden bed, consists of layering organic materials on top of the soil to create a nutrient rich environment for your plants, in this case, vegetables. No matter what your location, gardening the no dig way is an option for you. The garden literally composts the materials while feeding the plants. A raised garden bed means that it doesn't matter what sort of soil you currently have. Simply layer materials over the top of your surface and start growing!

http://www.no-dig-vegetablegarden.com/

Garden layout Producing our own food is one of our primary goals. We've located the first garden on our property between the greenhouse and barn. We plan to focus on gardening in raised beds, as well as experiment with winter growing and seed saving. Constructing Raised Garden Beds In preparation for our first vegetable garden we spent several weeks constructing raised garden beds. We designed the raised beds to protect the plants from wind, sun and hail, as well as to extend the growing season. 5 Secrets to a ‘No-work’ Garden It took over 20 years of gardening to realize that I didn’t have to work so hard to achieve a fruitful harvest. As the limitless energy of my youth gradually gave way to the physical realities of mid-life, the slow accretion of experience eventually led to an awareness that less work can result in greater crop yields. Inspired in part by Masanobu Fukuoka’s book, One Straw Revolution, my family experimented with gardening methods which could increase yields with less effort. Fukuoka spent over three decades perfecting his so-called “do-nothing” technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort.

HomeDecor The principle is simple and seductively clever: solar lights that store energy during the day and release light at night. These can be purchased ready-made in a variety of colors (yellow, blue and red) but they can also be built at home. A simple, less-technical approach involves buying a conventional solar-powered yard lamp and then essentially harvesting it for key pieces to put in a jar. This is simply a way of taking an existing solar lamp design and appropriating its parts to make something more attractive for display around a house or home. Constantly Tired? Here Are 10 Herbs To Increase Energy, Vitality, And Adaptability by JOHN SUMMERLY How difficult is it for us to achieve a work-life balance? How much more difficult is it to achieve a life-energy balance?

The Best Copyright-Free Photo Libraries: - DotGovWatch Exposing the good, the bad, and the buggy - A Blog Monitoring U.S. Federal, State, and Local Government Websites Thousands of photos taken by U.S. Government employees as part of their official duty are free of copyright and free to use. Based on my extensive review of government photo libraries, the best collections below. 1-Acre Homestead layout Everyone will have a different approach to keeping a self-sufficient homestead, and it’s unlikely that any two 1-acre farms will follow the same plan or methods or agree completely on how to homestead. Some people like cows; other people are afraid of them. Some people like goats; other people cannot keep them out of the garden. Some people will not slaughter animals and have to sell their surplus stock off to people who will kill them; others will not sell surplus stock off at all because they know that the animals will be killed; and still others will slaughter their own animals to provide their family with healthy meat. For myself, on a 1-acre farm of good, well-drained land, I would keep a cow and a goat, a few pigs and maybe a dozen hens.

4 Simple Steps to Grow a Hundred Pounds of Potatoes in a Barrel Container gardening isn't only for savvy urban gardeners and folks with limited space to grow, it can also be for folks who want to maximize their yields in a controlled environment. Not only does growing potatoes in a barrel reduce the amount of weeding and exposure to pests and fungi, you don't even have to risk shovel-damage to the tender potatoes by digging them out of the ground when they're done, just tip the container over! After extensive research to plan my own potatoes-in-a-barrel, I've boiled all of the recommendations down to 4 simple steps to a winning potato harvest. Geek fun: Twisted Architecture I didn’t set out to tie knots in Norman Foster’s Hearst Tower or wrinkle his Gherkin, but I got carried away. It’s one of the occupational hazards of working with Mathematica. It started with an innocent experiment in lofting, a technique also known as “skinning” that originated in boat-building. I wanted to explore some three-dimensional forms, and a basic lofting function seemed like a quick ticket to results. I dashed off the function Loft, which takes a stack of three-dimensional contours and covers it with a skin of polygons. Loft uses Mathematica‘s GraphicsComplex primitive to factor out the geometries of the polygons from their topologies.

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