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Educational Networking - List of Networks

Educational Networking - List of Networks
Elgg:Grou.ps:Facebook:Linked In:Ning:General:Art:Classroom Networks:Conferences:Course Material:English as a Foreign Language:English as a Second Language:English Education (Pre- and In-Service):Russian Education:Georgian recruiting :French as a Foreign language :Language Learning:Leadership:LibrariesMusic:Other LanguagesProfessional Development:Science:Social Studies:Spanish as a Foreign Language:Student Organizations:Teacher Education:Technology:Virtual Environments:Visual Mapping (Mind Mapping):Vocational:Other: A listing of social networks used in educational environments or for educational purposes. Please add to this list (alphabetical by category and within categories). BuddyPress: Apprendre 2.0 - Social Network across the world about education 2.0 and learning to learning - Most of the activities are in French in this network ! CourseCracker: Diigo: Elgg: Grou.ps: Facebook: Linked In: Ning: ScolaMates: General: Art: Classroom Networks: Conferences: Course Material: FSC-KU M.Ed. Leadership: Related:  Teaching Techniques

Presentation Skills Articles Enjoy our Effective Presentation Skills articles. Permission is granted to reprint articles in print or on your web site, complimentary, as long as you... 1. 2. To receive free presentation skills articles bi-monthly through The Presentation Edge email list, click the link below and send a blank email. PresentationEdge@ProEdgeSkills.com Click here to see presentation skills training Click here to see Customer Service Articles. » Use the Pygmalion Effect to Create a High Performing Team the awesome culture blog “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton The Pygmalion Effect Study In the 1960s, Harvard psychology professor Robert Rosenthal teamed up with South San Francisco elementary school principal Lenore Jacobson to conduct what later became known as the Pygmalion Effect study. “When teachers expect students to do well and show intellectual growth, they do; when teachers do not have such expectations, performance and growth are not so encouraged and may in fact be discouraged in a variety of ways.” Later studies revealed that when teachers have higher expectations of students, they unconsciously give more positive attention, feedback, and learning opportunities to those students. Marva Collins Marva Collins, one of the most extraordinary educators of the 20th century, offers another example of the Pygmalion Effect in action. Pygmalion in Management J. “A manager’s expectations are key to a subordinate’s performance and development.” The Golem Effect (Pygmalion in Reverse) 1. 2.

What is PBL? To help teachers do PBL well, we created a comprehensive, research-based model for PBL — a "gold standard" to help teachers, schools, and organizations to measure, calibrate, and improve their practice. In Gold Standard PBL, projects are focused on student learning goals and include Essential Project Design Elements: Interns - Tutor/Mentor Connection Richard Felder: Resources in Science and Engineering Education Richard Felder's Home Page Richard M. Felder Dr. Richard M. Richard Felder and Rebecca Brent's blog.

Successful Learning: Peer Learning Many institutions of learning now promote instructional methods involving ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to formulate their own questions, discuss issues, explain their viewpoints, and engage in cooperative learning by working in teams on problems and projects. ‘Peer learning’ is a form of cooperative learning that enhances the value of student-student interaction and results in various advantageous learning outcomes. To realise the benefits of peer learning, teachers must provide ‘intellectual scaffolding’. Thus, teachers prime students by selecting discussion topics that all students are likely to have some relevant knowledge of; they also raise questions/issues that prompt students towards more sophisticated levels of thinking. In addition, collaborative processes are devised to get all group members to participate meaningfully. Peer Learning Strategies To facilitate successful peer learning, teachers may choose from an array of strategies: Conclusion

Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who's Doing It Best "Art does not solve problems, but makes us aware of their existence," sculptor Magdalena Abakanowicz has said. Arts education, on the other hand, does solve problems. Years of research show that it's closely linked to almost everything that we as a nation say we want for our children and demand from our schools: academic achievement, social and emotional development, civic engagement, and equitable opportunity. Involvement in the arts is associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive ability, critical thinking, and verbal skill. Arts learning can also improve motivation, concentration, confidence, and teamwork. It has become a mantra in education that No Child Left Behind, with its pressure to raise test scores, has reduced classroom time devoted to the arts (and science, social studies, and everything else besides reading and math). The Connection Between Arts Education and Academic Achievement Yet against this backdrop, a new picture is emerging. Reviving Arts Education

Deep and Surface learning It is important to clarify what they are not. Although learners may be classified as “deep” or “surface”, they are not attributes of individuals: one person may use both approaches at different times, although she or he may have a preference for one or the other. They correlate fairly closely with motivation: “deep” with intrinsic motivation and “surface” with extrinsic, but they are not necessarily the same thing. Either approach can be adopted by a person with either motivation. There is a third form, known as the “Achieving” or strategic approach, which can be summarised as a very well-organised form of Surface approach, and in which the motivation is to get good marks. The exercise of learning is construed as a game, so that acquisition of technique improves performance. Time to 'fess up: I was that strategic learner. The features of Deep and Surface approaches can be summarised thus: (based on Ramsden, 1988) Two other points: Learning as a quantitative increase in knowledge.

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