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Harmony Explained: Progress Towards A Scientific Theory of Music

Harmony Explained: Progress Towards A Scientific Theory of Music
The Major Scale, The Standard Chord Dictionary, and The Difference of Feeling Between The Major and Minor Triads Explained from the First Principles of Physics and Computation; The Theory of Helmholtz Shown To Be Incomplete and The Theory of Terhardt and Some Others Considered Daniel Shawcross Wilkerson Begun 23 September 2006; this version 19 February 2012. Abstract and Introduction Most music theory books are like medieval medical textbooks: they contain unjustified superstition, non-reasoning, and funny symbols glorified by Latin phrases. In particular we derive from first principles of Physics and Computation the following three fundamental phenomena of music: the Major Scale, the Standard Chord Dictionary, and the difference in feeling between the Major and Minor Triads. Table of Contents 1 The Problem of Music1.1 Modern "Music Theory" Reads Like a Medieval Medical Textbook 1.2 What is a Satisfactory, Scientific Theory? ... wbwbw wbwbwbw wbwbw wbwbwbw ... What is a "scale"? Really?! Related:  Teoria

Music Monday: Best Basslines Happy Music Monday! Today we're gonna talk about basslines, those things you never notice unless they're very, very, very good. But when they are, boy do they improve a song, right? Scott's picked five good ones but overlooked several on purpose, in hopes you might call him out on what he's missed. Go on, start taking notes so you can put him in his place. Here's the first one: The Smiths - The Queen is Dead Go find someone who likes The Smiths, and they'll talk for hours about the band. Off to a good start already! Hey! Marvin Gaye - Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holla) I had to limit each artist on this list to one song only, otherwise What's Going On would have taken five slots by itself. Aerosmith - Sweet Emotion There aren't very many times a bass player gets to do a solo as an intro, so that should help illustrate how beloved the low end of "Sweet Emotion" has become. The Who - Boris The Spider Yes, I've skipped a few great ones. Muse - Hysteria

Jazz Progressions Jazz Progressions are simply common chord progressions in jazz music. One of the most common progressions is the ii-V-I progression. The ii-V-I sounds at its best when you use seventh chords and their expanded voicings. As you already know from past lessons, the ii chord is a minor chord, the V chord is a dominant chord, and the I chord is a major chord. Below, you will find a few examples to experiment with in addition to a set of chord diagrams showing various ii-V-I progressions. How to be a Rock Star in 5 Minutes: The 4 Chords to Stardom Sharebar Many of the greatest rock and pop hits from the past 40 years only use the same 4 chords. THE SAME 4 CHORDS. So if you were every thinking of being a rock or pop star, well then all you gotta do is keep writing sappy love songs using these same 4 chords until you make that hit! This was so famously exposed by the great Axis of Awesome in this video: (We made a video playlist of all these songs for your pleasure here: We’re going to show you what those chords are, what they look like on guitar and piano so you can get jammin! We have to thanks darthgabriel97, he spelled what the exact chords and variations you can use: “B Abm E F# but they are using E B C#m A. For Guitar I think I got this right. Here’s B, Abm, E, F# (C Major, A Sharp Major, E Major, F Sharp) Here’s E, B, C#m, A (E Major, B Major, C Sharp Minor, A Major) – THIS IS THE PATTERN AXIS OF AWESOME USES Here’s C, G, Am, F (C Major, G Major, A Minor, F Major) For Piano 30h!

classic piano method : how to play piano Here I publish a complete classic piano method by Karl Merz. This book was published in 1885 but contains many useful exercises and tips to study and learn piano. Moreover it contains helpful tips and suggestions for piano teachers Piano method summery Preface of the classic piano method by K. The very favorable reception extended to our instruction book for the "Parlor Organ," "The Musical Hints" and "The Elements of Harmony," have induced our publishers to request us to prepare for them also an Instruction book for the Piano. It is important that a skillful, masterly teacher should direct the first lessons of a pupil. Considerations about this piano method Remember that not only should a child's fingers and hands develop, but also its mind. Disclaimer: This work is - Author: Merz, Karl, 1836-1890 - Digitizing Sponsor: MSN - Book Contributor: Music - University of Toronto - Corrections, elaborations and final digitalization by Paolo Parrella

30+ Insanely Useful Websites for Guitarists The guitar is an instrument that knows no genre and no boundaries--one of the reasons why it's arguably the world's most beloved instrument. Here are over 30 incredibly useful (and often entertaining) websites dedicated to the guitar and its admirers. Must-see sites 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Soloing 6. 100 Greatest Guitar Solos is a ranked list of the greatest guitar solos of all time with included tablature for each. 7. 20 Greatest Guitar Solos Ever resembles the beginning of the above list, but with crispy and delicious YouTube videos for each entry. 8. Inspirational articles 9. 10. 99 Tips to Help You Play Better features 99 pearls of wisdom from guitar wizards like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani and Jimmi Page. “Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. 11. Free guitar tabs and guitar chords The online guitar tablature community was in turmoil just a few months ago when the legal status of tabs was questioned. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17. Free guitar lessons 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Guitar theory 25. 26.

Outline of basic music theory - www.oscarvandillen.com Professional music theory: an outline of basic music theory. Preface and Chapter 1 of the Outline of basic music theory – by Oscar van Dillen ©2011-2014 The beginner’s learning book can be found at Basic elements of music theory. Overview of chapters: Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Sound and hearing Chapter 3: Musical notation Chapter 4: Basic building blocks of melody and harmony Chapter 5: Consonance and dissonance Chapter 6: Circle of fifths and transposition Chapter 7: Concerning rhythm, melody, harmony and form Chapter 8: Further study Preface This outline offers a concise and complete overview of basic music theory. In order to speed up consulting this online book, its chapters can as of now be found on separate pages; unfortunately the original one-page version exceeded acceptable download times, because of the length of the total materials presented. © Oscar van Dillen 2011-2014 Chapter 1: Introduction integrating hearing-reading-singing-writing

Better Guitar - Guitar Songs You Should Learn. There are certain songs that every guitar player should try to learn. Either they are commonly requested or they have cool guitar parts that will expand your playing skills. I am going to list songs in several styles of music and explain why I think they should be add to your “play list.” While most are electric guitar songs, there are some acoustic songs also. Obviously, this type of list won’t ever be comprehensive, and no doubt, many will disagree with my choices — and find many ommissions. But I have choosen songs I think are worth learning. This is a huge list and will take most players years to complete (if ever.) Johnny B.

Products : Overview : Music Software How Music Works is a comprehensive suite of multimedia tutorials which explain music in clear, simple language you can relate to. Packed with 115 topics in nine tutorials, and illustrated with 360 diagrams and 750 demonstration sounds, the tutorials start with the very basics of music and advance to topics which are valuable even for professional musicians. Whatever musical instrument or style you are interested in, these tutorials will be an essential source of information and guidance for years to come. The How Music Works tutorials are available online at www.howmusicworks.org but these tutorials are not printable and do not have the sounds. To get the full benefit of the tutorials, the ChordWizard Music Theory software is highly recommended.

Harmonic Progressions | Learning and Loving Music Theory Kelvin, You actually caught a mistake on the roman numerals! Thanks, I’ll have to fix that. The first and last chords of the progression are not 7th chords. Somehow I inadvertently typed “I7″ on the first chord of all the major keys. (Notice that I didn’t do that for the minor keys.) In the classical tradition, for the sake of stability, the first and last chords of a circle-of-fifths progression are usually triads, not 7th chords. Harmonic Sequences Part 2 In the jazz tradition all chords usually are 7ths, in which case the progression will start and end with 7th chords. Thanks again for your interest and input.

I Got Rhythm! | My Piano Riffs Hmm…the blog post title sounds like a mashup of my two favorite musical elements! Well, it is…but leaning more towards the rhythmic aspects of when and where chords move. In other words, harmonic rhythm refers to the rate of chord change or how often one chord progresses to another. Most songs or compositions are written in a form in which the total number of bars is divisible by two. This torch song has a classic A-A-B-C form, where each letter represents an 8-bar phrase. This is why it is common to see II-V-I progressions that fall on a 4-bar “Strong-Weak-Strong-Weak” phrase. Examples from “Autumn Leaves” are the following progressions: Ami7/// D7/// Gma7/// //// and F#mi7(b5)/// B7/// Emi/// ////. This principle also holds true when the phrase breaks down to a basic 2-bar unit. Two-bar phrase examples from “Blue Moon” are the following progressions: Fmi7/ Bb7/ Eb/// in Line 5 and Abmi7/Db7/ Gb/// in Line 6. This applies to all contemporary music.

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