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Christopher Alexander

Christopher Alexander
Christopher Alexander Christopher Wolfgang Alexander (born October 4, 1936 in Vienna, Austria) is an architect noted for his theories about design, and for more than 200 building projects in California, Japan, Mexico and around the world. Reasoning that users know more about the buildings they need than any architect could, he produced and validated (in collaboration with Sarah Ishikawa and Murray Silverstein) a "pattern language" designed to empower anyone to design and build at any scale. Alexander is often overlooked by texts in the history and theory of architecture because his work intentionally disregards contemporary architectural discourse.[1] As such, Alexander is widely considered to occupy a place outside the discipline, the discourse, and the practice of Architecture.[citation needed] In 1958, he moved from England to the United States, living and teaching in Berkeley, California from 1963. He is professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Education[edit] Related:  Slums - Theory

Reinventing America's Cities: Discovering Opportunities by Challenging Biases The current economic crisis, increasing ecological concerns, and growing urban populations are remarkable opportunities for innovative thinking and strategic policies to redesign our cities. In that regard, a March 29, 2009 article, entitled "Reinventing America's Cities: The Time is Now," by the architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff in the New York Times was particularly welcome for a number of reasons. First, it appeared in a publication that is influential and widely read by the professionals and policy makers responsible for shaping our cities. Second, instead of the often fawning tone of articles of one-off spectacular buildings by star architects, this essay was measured, thoughtful, and highlighted modest yet significant efforts by architects, urban designers, and planners to redesign cities such as New Orleans, Los Angeles, New York, and Buffalo. A marketplace in New Delhi: Isn't this what the West aspires to? Dr.

The Rise And Fall Of Poverty Porn The dramatic pseudo-orchestral music of '80s action-movie schlock begins. Arnold Schwarzenegger appears on the screen, and for the next three minutes gets progressively more bloodied, beaten, and battered as he fights to rescue his on-screen daughter. This isn’t a trailer for the movie Commando. It’s a narration by Alex, a precocious 9-year-old Tanzanian boy who is--as 9-year-old boys tend to be with violent movies--obsessed. The three-minute YouTube video cuts back and forth between Alex and clips from the movie, as he narrates every key plot twist, complete with action moments and sound effects. And that’s the point. The modern era of the humanitarian crisis was born on American televisions in 1968. Within a few months, mass starvation began. In the subsequent three decades, humanitarian organizations became more and more adept at leveraging images of poverty, disease, and famine to access charitable donations. Even more so, however, it reflects a changing generational sensibility.

Glossary: Terrain Vague | Urban Attributes - Andalusia Center for Contemporary Art With the coining of the term Terrain Vague, Ignasi de Solà-Morales is interested in the form of absence in the contemporary metropolis. This interest focuses on abandoned areas, on obsolete and unproductive spaces and buildings, often undefined and without specific limits, places to which he applies the French term terrain vague. Regarding the generalized tendency to "reincorporate" these places to the productive logic of the city by transforming them into reconstructed spaces, Solà-Morales insists on the value of their state of ruin and lack of productivity. Only in this way can these strange urban spaces manifest themselves as spaces of freedom that are an alternative to the lucrative reality prevailing in the late capitalist city. They represent an anonymous reality. The term Terrain Vague is part of a proposal of urban analysis that is an alternative to models of structuralist origin; these have demonstrated their inefficiency in their confrontation with contemporary urban events.

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1-s2.0-S0197397502000723-main.pdf (application/pdf Object) The tricky question of calling a “slum” a slum « Source: – London (Left, 1880) and Mumbai (Right, 2009) slums, London ( Mumbai (Author’s, Betwala Chawl) Since most of our contributions in our delicious favelissues blog deal with slum or informal settlements I wanted to share with you today a brief analysis of the history and diversity of how we define “slums”. A couple of months ago, I had the opportunity to have Alain Gilbert as one of the jury’s of my PhD dissertation and had to defend my use of the word “slum” throughout my manuscript – bear in mind that my PhD was on slum policies so the word “slum” was very common. Alain has been one of the academics leading the “slum” definition debate and argues that academics and practitioners should avoid defining “slums” as slums because of the negative connotation this term is related to (Tucker Landesman mentions Alain’s position on his previous post)[2]. Achieving a consensus? Like this:

The tricky question of calling a “slum” a slum « Source: – London (Left, 1880) and Mumbai (Right, 2009) slums, London ( Mumbai (Author’s, Betwala Chawl) Since most of our contributions in our delicious favelissues blog deal with slum or informal settlements I wanted to share with you today a brief analysis of the history and diversity of how we define “slums”. A couple of months ago, I had the opportunity to have Alain Gilbert as one of the jury’s of my PhD dissertation and had to defend my use of the word “slum” throughout my manuscript – bear in mind that my PhD was on slum policies so the word “slum” was very common. Alain has been one of the academics leading the “slum” definition debate and argues that academics and practitioners should avoid defining “slums” as slums because of the negative connotation this term is related to (Tucker Landesman mentions Alain’s position on his previous post)[2]. Achieving a consensus? Like this:

Who’s Afraid of the Informal?: slum as an analytical category « Photo montage by Dionsio Gonzales Continuing the dialogical debate between FAVELissues writers about the conflation of informality and slums at the glocal scale. Following Lubiana’s post about urban informality as a form of protesting economic inequality and my own post praising the social relations engendered by informal spaces both in Occupied space and favelas, Sylvia Soonets, from Proyectos Arqui 5 in Caracas, passionately cautioned against romanticizing informal housing settlements based on political sympathizes or allegiances to various local–global Occupy protest movements. She is right to critique discourses that seem to characterize slums as sanitized bastions of the creative and resourceful human spirit. A romantic portrayal of poverty manifested as slum was not my intention. The encampments of Occupiers (turned squatters?) The massive Plaza of the Three Powers, empty as per usual in Brasilia, capital of Brazil. — Follow me on twitter: @yosoytucker D Simon. 2011. Like this:

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