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3.2" LCD Touch Screen Display Kit

3.2" LCD Touch Screen Display Kit

PIR Sensor (Rev B) Item code: 555-28027 What It Can Do Detects motion of humans or animals from as far away as 30 feetSilent operation for alarms, motion activated nightlights, holiday propsAutomatically resets after period of inactivity Passive infrared (PIR) sensors detect motion by comparing the amount of infrared radiation that reaches a pair of detectors. When the two detectors “see” different values, the sensor indicates it as movement of an object, such as a person or an animal. PIR sensors are often used in driveway security systems, which turn on a light (but only at night) when someone approaches the house. The Parallax PIR Motion Sensor has a simple on/off output: when on, the sensor is detecting movement. A selectable jumper on the sensor lets you set working distance: L (for Long) position, the effective sensor distance is up to 30 feet. For proper operation the sensor should be allowed to warm up for 20 to 60 seconds after first applying power. Parts List Basic Wiring Program KickStarts Arduino Uno

Electronics - Electronic Components Distributor PIR Motion Sensor The PIR Sensor Rev B can tell when something nearby moves. The sensor detects the pattern of infrared energy in its surroundings. If the pattern changes, the sensor outputs a high signal. The Propeller microcontroller only needs to monitor this signal with an I/O pin to know if something is moving around nearby. Parts (1) PIR Sensor Rev B (#555-28027)(1) 220 ohm resistor(3) jumper wires The PIR sensor connects to 3.3 V, ground and a single Propeller microcontroller I/O pin. Turn off power to your board’s prototyping area (PWR switch to 0 for the Activity Board).Connect your PIR Rev B to your Activity Board as shown below. The following program continuously checks and prints the output state of the PIR sensor. If you haven't already installed the latest USB driver, SimpleIDE, or Learn folder, go to Propeller C - Set up SimpleIDE. Click the Run with Terminal button.Hold still until you see “state = 0” in the SimpleIDE Terminal.Now, wave your hand in front of the sensor’s dome.

DigitalReadSerial Learning Examples | Foundations | Hacking | Links Examples > Basics Digital Read Serial This example shows you how to monitor the state of a switch by establishing serial communication between your Arduino and your computer over USB. Hardware Required Arduino Board A momentary switch, button, or toggle switch 10k ohm resistor breadboard hook-up wire Circuit image developed using Fritzing. Connect three wires to the Arduino board. Pushbuttons or switches connect two points in a circuit when you press them. If you disconnect the digital i/o pin from everything, the LED may blink erratically. Schematic Code In the program below, the very first thing that you do will in the setup function is to begin serial communications, at 9600 bits of data per second, between your Arduino and your computer with the line: Serial.begin(9600); Next, initialize digital pin 2, the pin that will read the output from your button, as an input: pinMode(2,INPUT); int sensorValue = digitalRead(2); Serial.println(sensorValue);

Arduino - HomePage Light-emitting diode Parts of an LED. Although unlabeled, the flat bottom surfaces of the anvil and post embedded inside the epoxy act as anchors, to prevent the conductors from being forcefully pulled out via mechanical strain or vibration. An LED is often small in area (less than 1 mm2) and integrated optical components may be used to shape its radiation pattern.[5] Appearing as practical electronic components in 1962,[6] the earliest LEDs emitted low-intensity infrared light. Early LEDs were often used as indicator lamps for electronic devices, replacing small incandescent bulbs. Recent developments in LEDs permit them to be used in environmental and task lighting. LEDs have allowed new displays and sensors to be developed, while their high switching rates are also used in advanced communications technology. History[edit] Discoveries and early devices[edit] Green electroluminescence from a point contact on a crystal of SiC recreates Round's original experiment from 1907. Initial commercial development[edit]

Medical First Aid Training, Institute of Advanced Security Management The initial stages of the electronic security market in India were marked by a profusion of vendors and service providers, a none-too-aware market and a lack of awareness among customers. Recent years have seen a more ‘serious' electronic security market coming into view in India. While the crowd of manufacturers is still seen, especially in the lower end of the market, the entry of international players in the market, either through local companies, tie-ups or imports has given it a more organized feel. As there is no formal education on electronic security, getting trained man power is an uphill task and also for the working brigade to hone their skills time to time is pretty difficult, we have formulated courses catering to the growing requirements of the electronic security industry. Installers / Service Engineers Click to view more Sales Engineers

Ultraviolet Portable ultraviolet lamp Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than X-rays, that is, in the range between 400 nm and 100 nm, corresponding to photon energies from 3 eV to 124 eV. It is so-named because the spectrum consists of electromagnetic waves with frequencies higher than those that humans identify as the color violet. UV light is found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as mercury lamps and black lights. Although ultraviolet radiation is invisible to the human eye, most people are aware of the effect it has on the skin of fair-skinned people, i.e., the suntan and sunburn. Discovery The discovery of the ultraviolet radiation below 200 nm, named vacuum ultraviolet because it is strongly absorbed by air, was made in 1893 by the German physicist Victor Schumann.[5] Origin of the term Subtypes Sources Natural sources and filters Atmospheric filtering Glass filtering

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) Colour | Sizes and shapes | Resistor value | LEDs in series | LED data | Flashing | Displays Also see: Lamps Example LED: Circuit symbol: Function LEDs emit light when an electric current passes through them. Connecting and soldering LEDs must be connected the correct way round, the diagram may be labelled a or + for anode and k or - for cathode (yes, it really is k, not c, for cathode!). LEDs can be damaged by heat when soldering, but the risk is small unless you are very slow. Testing an LED Never connect an LED directly to a battery or power supply! LEDs must have a resistor in series to limit the current to a safe value, for quick testing purposes a 1k resistor is suitable for most LEDs if your supply voltage is 12V or less. For an accurate value please see Calculating an LED resistor value below. Colours of LEDs LEDs are available in red, orange, amber, yellow, green, blue and white. Tri-colour LEDs The diagram shows the construction of a tri-colour LED. Bi-colour LEDs ). For example

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) Colour | Sizes and shapes | Resistor value | LEDs in series | LED data | Flashing | Displays Also see: Lamps Example LED: Circuit symbol: Function LEDs emit light when an electric current passes through them. Connecting and soldering LEDs must be connected the correct way round, the diagram may be labelled a or + for anode and k or - for cathode (yes, it really is k, not c, for cathode!). LEDs can be damaged by heat when soldering, but the risk is small unless you are very slow. Testing an LED Never connect an LED directly to a battery or power supply! LEDs must have a resistor in series to limit the current to a safe value, for quick testing purposes a 1k resistor is suitable for most LEDs if your supply voltage is 12V or less. For an accurate value please see Calculating an LED resistor value below. Colours of LEDs LEDs are available in red, orange, amber, yellow, green, blue and white. Tri-colour LEDs The diagram shows the construction of a tri-colour LED. Bi-colour LEDs ). For example

How to Analyze Resistive Circuits Using Ohm's Law (with pictures) Ohm's law may be written [1] in 3 equivalent forms depending on what is being solved for: "V" is the voltage across the resistance (the "potential difference"), "I" is the current through the resistance, and "R" is the value of the resistance. If the resistance is a resistor (a component having a calibrated value of resistance) it is usually labelled with "R" followed by a number, such as "R1", "R105", etc. Form (1) is easily converted into forms (2) or (3) by algebraic manipulation. In some cases the letter "E" is used in place of "V" (for example, E = IR), where "E" stands for EMF or "electromotive force" which is another name for voltage. Form (1) is used when the current is known through a resistor of known value. Form (2) is used when the voltage is known across a resistor of known value. Form (3) is used when the resistor value is unknown, but the voltage across it and current through it are known, allowing the resistance to be computed. Example: Voltage Drop Across a Wire

Ninja Blocks Kit | Ninja Blocks Temperature & Humidity Use the included Temperature & Humidity sensor to monitor your wine collection from anywhere in the world or use the Ninja Rules Engine to build the world's best thermostat. Motion Sensor Get peace of mind by using the included wireless motion sensor to build a security system that talks to the web or simply use it to let you know when the kids are at home. Door Bell Never miss a delivery again! Window & Door Sensor The wireless Window & Door sensor takes your security system to the next level. Arduino Compatible If you want to get your coding hands dirty, the Ninja Block contains an Arduino compatible micro-controller, that you can program using the official Arduino IDE. BeagleBone Inside each Ninja Block is a credit card sized Open Source Computer called a BeagleBone running Ubuntu (Linux). RGB LED Eyes You can control your Ninja Block's RGB LED eyes. Open Hardware The Hack Me tags give you instant access to the Open Source Computer and Arduino inside.

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