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Dy/dan

Dy/dan
SRI's report on Khan Academy usage, released earlier this month, has the potential to make us all a lot wiser. They studied Khan Academy use at nine sites over two years, recording field notes, survey results, usage logs, and achievement measures, all well-specified in an 82-page implementation report and summarized in a shorter briefing. Their report has sharpened some of my concerns about the use of Khan Academy in math classrooms while blunting others. First, there is irony to be found in SRI's reporting of usage rather than efficacy. The Gates Foundation underwrote the SRI report and while Gates endorses value-added models of quality for teachers it doesn't extend the same scrutiny towards its portfolio company here. After reading SRI's report, though, I'm convinced this exploratory study was the right study to run.

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Putting Asilomar into action A week has passed since I went to the annual California Math Council conference at Asilomar. It was my first time attending, and, my god, it got me fired up to get back to work teaching kids math. Luckily, my wait was only a matter of hours. Questimate! - the estimation game where *you* make the questions How many giraffes would be as tall as Mt. Everest? How fast is the world’s fastest train? How many jelly beans would fill up a soccer ball?

Building the Culture of an Empowered Mindset Towards Technology Innovation I have been having an incredible year of learning in my half-time role with Parkland School Division, along with speaking and consulting for other schools/districts. I have learned a lot from both positions and I feel that it is very valuable to be able to look at school cultures within your organization, while also looking at what other schools do from an outsider’s perspective. In this work, I have realized how truly important the role of principal is in building, not only in creating a positive culture, but an innovative one.

Four Quadrant Graphing Characters Worksheets This Graphing Worksheet will produce a four quadrant coordinate grid and a set of ordered pairs that when correctly plotted and connected will produce different characters. You may select which one of the characters you wish to make. These graphing puzzles contain over 40 ordered pairs to plot, divided into 3 to 16 different shapes. For each shape plot the ordered pairs on the axis and connect them in order. If you wish to practice with easier puzzles use our Four Quadrant Graphing Puzzle which contain 10 to 40 ordered pairs. Select the worksheet you wish to make by checking the round button below the image.

Mr Reddy Maths Blog There seems to be a current surge from Heads of Maths and KS3 Maths Coordinators looking to adopt more of a mastery approach to teaching maths. This post is a quick run through of the journey the curriculum at King Solomon Academy has gone through and concludes with some advice … Read more → 11:33 TES Team: Hello and welcome to TES Maths Week. We’ll be joined from 7pm by DfE minister Liz Truss, who’ll be answering your questions on maths in the new primary and secondary curriculum. Other People’s Problems October 27th, 2011 by Dan Meyer Malcolm Swan: Draw a shape on squared paper and plot a point to show its perimeter and area. Which points on the grid represent squares, rectangles, etc. Draw a shape that may be represented by the point (4, 12) or (12, 4). Find all the “impossible” points.

21 Common Core-Aligned Math Apps for High School Students From edshelf by edshelf: Reviews & recommendations of tools for education If your high school has adopted Common Core Standards and provides students with iPads (either 1:1 or via an iPad cart), you will need to find apps that map to these standards. And if you teach math, you are in luck. Math and engineering teacher Chris Beyerle from South Carolina curates this collection of math apps. These map to the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Are You the Keymaster? There have always been stupid ideas around education. Always. Mostly from one of these sources. Downloads “’We translated some textbook pages from a Japanese math textbook,’ Stigler told me, sitting in his office in the rabbit warren that is the UCLA psychology department. ‘There was a really interesting note in the teacher’s edition, and it said: ‘The most common mistake students will make in adding fractions is that they will add the denominators.’ Then it said: ‘Do not correct this mistake. If you correct it, they will immediately stop doing it. But what you really want is for them to take several weeks to understand the consequences of adding the denominators and why that doesn’t work.’” Source

More than a maths teacher In his book Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable, Seth Godin, a marketing expert, argues that advertising is less effective than it used to be because we are bombarded by adverts – which we tend to ignore. His solution is to have an amazing product – a purple cow in a field of black and white cows, so that it stands out and really captures the imagination. In his presentation at TM Bett 14, Julian Wood suggested that something similar could be done in our classrooms. That got me thinking. Which of my lessons stand out and grab the students attention? [3ACTS] Pyramid Of Pennies July 8th, 2011 by Dan Meyer The Goods Download the full archive [33.9 MB].

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