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MAP Assessment Tasks

MAP Assessment Tasks
Related:  Maths ResourcesSummer Math Academy 2014

Functional Mathematics illustrative mathematics Illustrated Standards Count to 100 by ones and by tens. (see illustrations) Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1). Write numbers from 0 to 20. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger. Count to answer “how many?” Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. Fluently add and subtract within 5. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.

Tasks, Units & Student Work - Common Core Library Keywords (optional) Enter keywords (e.g., K.OA.3, informational text, arguments, quadratic equations, etc.) Grade (select at least one) Subject (select one) NYC educators and national experts are developing Common Core-aligned tasks embedded in a unit of study to support schools in implementing the Citywide Instructional Expectations. Search a growing assortment of Common Core-aligned tasks, units and student work by keyword, grade level, subject area and Common Core Learning Standard. The components of the Common Core-aligned tasks with instructional supports include: Unit overview and task description Teacher-annotated student work representing a range of performance levels Rubrics used to assess student work Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles Other instructional support materials To learn more about the components of these tasks and units and for help navigating the interactive student work, watch our virtual training modules. NEW!

Inside Math: Problems of the Month Problem solving is the cornerstone of doing mathematics. A problem that you can’t solve in less than a day is usually a problem that is similar to one that you have solved before. But in real life, a problem is a situation that confronts you and you don’t have an idea of where to even start. If we want our students to be problem solvers and mathematically powerful, we must model perseverance and challenge students with non-routine problems. Administrators, teachers and parents should facilitate and support students in the process of attacking and reasoning about the problems. The solution is not as important as the process of problem solving. The educator or parent should not be impatient with the student’s struggle. The principal should embrace the concept of problem solving and model problem-solving leadership, being a facilitator of non-routine problems. Once the problem is presented to the students, the principal should be visible in facilitating the tasks alongside the teachers.

Mathematical, Motivational & Memorable | www.cre8atemaths.org.uk Space Math @ NASA ! 3-Act Problems | Teaching Outside the Norm Dan Meyer MEDIAN Don Steward secondary maths teaching

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