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Six Tips to Help You Remember Your Lines

Six Tips to Help You Remember Your Lines

25 Things You Should Know About Character Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Here you’ll find the many things I believe — at this moment! 1. Without character, you have nothing. 2. A great character can be the line between narrative life and story death. 3. Don’t believe that all those other aspects are separate from the character. 4. The audience will do anything to spend time with a great character. 5. It is critical to know what a character wants from the start. 6. It doesn’t matter if we “like” your character, or in the parlance of junior high whether we even “like-like” your character. 7. It is critical to smack the audience in the crotchal region with an undeniable reason to give a fuck. 8. You must prove this thesis: “This character is worth the audience’s time.” 9. Don’t let the character be a dingleberry stuck to the ass of a toad as he floats downriver on a bumpy log. 10. 11. 12. 13. The law of threes. 15. 16. 17. 18.

15 Film Production Credits Explained Ever wonder what all those strange credits are when they roll by at the end of a film? I used to, until I moved to LA, where I started meeting Best Boys and Dolly Grips with their kids when I took my son to the playground—yes, Hollywood, where you meet Gaffers and Armourers at your average Saturday night house party. So I started asking questions, and here's what I've learned: 1. Boom Operator No, this job has nothing to do with explosives or pyrotechnics. 2. Now this job does deal with explosives, of a sort. 3. Though the gaffer manages the entire electrical department, all the guys who run cables and hang lights, his main responsibility is mounting and positioning lights and lighting rigs. 4. Grips are sort of like worker bees. 5. This guy runs the Grips dept and assists the Gaffer. 6. This guy has nothing at all to do with a wedding, unless we're talking something like Wedding Crashers . 7. A dolly grip operates the movie camera dolly. 8. 9. 10. This guy oversees the painting dept. 11.

10 Things I Wish I&d Been told in College (and 1 I was) | Cambiare... Everyone loves lists. Well. I love lists, and while there’s been a lot of talk over my three years actively blogging about theatre about the failings of the Theatre Education Industrial Complex, we’ve not really attempted to create a curriculum we approve of. Largely because, well, creating a new theatre education paradigm is hard. And I’m not going to do that here, because I’m not sure how to even begin. Instead? I also want to include the one thing I WAS told outside the framework of the program that really helped. In no particular order: Read Everything. The one Real thing I was told off the record was by Nancy Saklad. “You can do this you know. After 5 years of college and 3 years in high school she was the first person who ever said such a thing to me. “But you have to work at it.”

Fallacy List 1. FAULTY CAUSE: (post hoc ergo propter hoc) mistakes correlation or association for causation, by assuming that because one thing follows another it was caused by the other. example: A black cat crossed Babbs' path yesterday and, sure enough, she was involved in an automobile accident later that same afternoon. example: The introduction of sex education courses at the high school level has resulted in increased promiscuity among teens. A recent study revealed that the number of reported cases of STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) was significantly higher for high schools that offered courses in sex education than for high schools that did not. 2. example: Muffin must be rich or have rich parents, because she belongs to ZXQ, and ZXQ is the richest sorority on campus. example: I'd like to hire you, but you're an ex-felon and statistics show that 80% of ex-felons recidivate. 3. example: All of those movie stars are really rude. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. example: Only man is rational. 12.

A 1945 Code of Ethics for Theatre Workers Surfaces | LA STAGE TIMES Mayor Eric Garcetti “was proud to host the Los Angeles arts community at City Hall to hear ideas about showcasing LA as the Creative Capital of the World,” according to his Facebook page. His social media writers were referring to his appearance before a roomful of arts and foundation leaders last week. The Facebook post didn’t take note of the other half of Garcetti’s message — that he won’t provide any additional city money for the arts. But he intends to help raise private money for them, as part of his “showcasing” efforts. I didn’t hear him mention LA theater except in this brief snippet: “Don’t come to me with ‘My theater company needs [fill in the] blank. We need you to think broadly’.” After Garcetti spoke and then answered a few questions from the audience, he left. Anyway, I’m glad that Garcetti has the arts on his mind, as well as his many other issues. Yes, east Hollywood. And so diversity is part of the fabric of Schlomo. Schlomo goes down dark paths.

The Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever The Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever is a logic puzzle invented by American philosopher and logician George Boolos and published in The Harvard Review of Philosophy in 1996. A translation in Italian was published earlier in the newspaper La Repubblica, under the title L'indovinello più difficile del mondo. The puzzle is inspired by Raymond Smullyan. It is stated as follows: Three gods A, B, and C are called, in no particular order, True, False, and Random. Boolos provides the following clarifications:[1] a single god may be asked more than one question, questions are permitted to depend on the answers to earlier questions, and the nature of Random's response should be thought of as depending on the flip of a coin hidden in his brain: if the coin comes down heads, he speaks truly; if tails, falsely.[2] History[edit] The solution[edit] Boolos provided his solution in the same article in which he introduced the puzzle. Boolos' question was to ask A: Equivalently: If I asked you Q, would you say ja?

13 Docs That Theatre Lovers Should Know After yesterday’s lengthy survey of fictional films about theatre, I would be remiss in not sharing with you a baker’s dozen documentaries about theatre, most of which are probably even more obscure than some of their fictional counterparts. Unlike the films cited yesterday, which stretch over an almost 80 year period of filmmaking, the oldest of those listed below dates back just 40 years, and the majority are much more recent than that. This likely stems from two key factors: a) the rise of documentary, cinema verite filmmaking began to proliferate only in the 1960s, and even more recently, b) the advent of high quality digital video cameras, which significantly reduced the expense of shooting documentaries. Outside of valuable archives like the New York Public Library’s Theatre on Film and Tape Collection at Lincoln Center, the net result of making theatre, namely the show itself, is all too fleeting, even for those that manage sustained runs.

10 of the world's biggest unsolved mysteries: Voynich Manuscript Voynich Manuscript Named after the Polish-American antiquarian bookseller Wilfrid M. Voynich, who acquired it in 1912, the Voynich Manuscript is a detailed 240-page book written in a language or script that is completely unknown. Theories abound about the origin and nature of the manuscript. One thing most theorists agree on is that the book is unlikely to be a hoax, given the amount of time, money and detail that would have been required to make it.

Shortcut ot Improv: Say it like you mean it Don't forget to read the Disclaimers Shortcuts to improv: Say it like to mean it. One of the easiest, yet most overlooked, tricks in improv performance is the simple act of speaking definitively. All too often, players on stage speak in mumbled, meek, meager, tones of voice. Other times, players decide that the best course of action is to rapidly blurt out as many words as possible, heaping one outrageous statement onto the next; the assumption being that the law of large numbers will be on their side, and somehow, magically, if they say enough in one sentence and overwhelm the enemy with verbal assaults then something in there must certainly be “right”. And then amazingly, strange as it may seem, the scene goes absolutely nowhere. And that’s a shame, because the whole ugly mess is so easy to avoid. - The Fears - The 900 pound elephant that prevents people from speaking confidently on stage is the fact that what we are doing is… improv. Well, those are all very good points. Playing god: or

Voynich Manuscript Written in Central Europe at the end of the 15th or during the 16th century, the origin, language, and date of the Voynich Manuscript—named after the Polish-American antiquarian bookseller, Wilfrid M. Voynich, who acquired it in 1912—are still being debated as vigorously as its puzzling drawings and undeciphered text. Described as a magical or scientific text, nearly every page contains botanical, figurative, and scientific drawings of a provincial but lively character, drawn in ink with vibrant washes in various shades of green, brown, yellow, blue, and red. For a complete physical description and foliation, including missing leaves, see the Voynich catalog record. Read a detailed chemical analysis of the Voynich Manuscript (8 p., pdf) History of the Collection Like its contents, the history of ownership of the Voynich manuscript is contested and filled with some gaps. References Goldstone, Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone. 2005. Romaine Newbold, William. 1928. Manly, John Mathews. 1921.

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