background preloader

Earthbag Construction

Earthbag Construction
EarthBag Homes - you're standing on the building materials... earthbag home Long sandbags are filled on-site and arranged in layers or as compressed coils. Stabilizers such as cement, lime, or sodium carbonate may be added to an ideal mix of 70% sand, 30% clay. Straw may also be added. The earthbags are then plastered over with adobe. Arquitectura en Equilibrio (Architecture in Balance) flickr.com earthbag home Plastic bags recycled into plastic bags -- if plastic does not break down for a thousand years, this building is sure to last several lifetimes. earthbag construction Foundations differ as per site. earthbag construction The time consuming part, filling the bags. earthbag construction Testing the strength of an arch. earthbag home Project Seres, Guatemala. projectseres.org, flickr.com earthbag home CalEarth -- Emergency Shelter Village, Hesperia, California. earthbag home Cal Earth -- Emergency Shelters. earthbag home CalEarth let the layers show. Resources: Lessons: More Pictures:

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/earthbag-construction.html

Related:  Earthbag BuildingEarth Bag BuildingsEarthbag BuildingSustainable/Low Cost HomesEarthbag Home and Construction

One Natural Builder's Next Big Adventure Called: The Fossil Fuel-Free House Morgan Caraway is a natural builder, homesteader, intentional community co-founder and author. In 2009 his wife, Mary Jane, and he moved on to a piece of undeveloped land in the Blue Ridge Mountains and began a homesteading adventure. Theye built a yurt, earthbag house and a cordwood bath house. Since then they have joined a small, private intentional community and have helped build a pole barn and an earthbag house using earthship principles. Please help them in this IndieGoGo campaign. Our first earthbag house. Triple Dome Survival Shelter « Earthbag House Plans April 12, 2011 by Owen Geiger Triple Dome Survival Shelter (click to enlarge) Specifications: Three 16′ interior diameter domes with 603 sq. ft. interior, 3 sleeping lofts with 312 sq. ft., total 915 sq. ft. interior, one bedroom, one bath, Footprint: 38′ x 38′

Resources for Earthbag Building Suppliers of Bags Globally China Forest Packaging Group Co.,Ltd www.forestpackaging.com Tel: +86 151 656 64026 Fax:+86 536 827 3455 Bill Chen, Sales Manager chinaforestpackATgmail.com Bill Chen does communicate in English. This factory in China (and Cambodia) can provide a wide range of polypropylene bags, both as individually sewn bags, and as long tubes on a rolls. They ship via containers (or partial containers) and have delivery to Haiti. Tamped Earth Floors Unstabilized Earthen Floor Using Road Base by Frank Meyer [Note: This technique by Frank Meyer is a alternate method for making earthen floors. Tamped earth floors dry much faster than poured adobe and also cracks less.]

How to build My 50 Dollar Greenhouse First off – you really can build this thing very cheaply, but to do so you have to recycle, freecycle, and scrounge. If you just go out and buy new everything it will probably cost over $200 – still not bad all in all.This Article is featured in Jan 2010 issue of Birds and Blooms Magazine!Want to find out if this thing works before you read all this? Insulated Earthbag Foundations for Yurts Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, first read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building and How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse . This Instructable includes complete step-by-step instructions on how to make an insulated earthbag foundation. You can use the same process to make insulated foundations for any type of structure – straw bale, earthbag, cordwood, etc. Yurts or gers are very efficient and practical in harsh, cold climates, as evidenced by centuries of use in Mongolia. Benefits of yurts include affordability, rapid construction, ease of construction, wind resistance, great looks and portability (ability to take your home with you if you ever move). You may even save on taxes since some jurisdictions do not consider yurts permanent homes.

Article about the history of earthbag building A Short History of Earthbag Building by Kelly Hart The idea of making walls by stacking bags of sand or earth has been around for at least a century. Originally sand bags were used for flood control and military bunkers because they are easy to transport to where they need to be used, fast to assemble, inexpensive, and effective at their task of warding off both water and bullets. At first natural materials such as burlap were used to manufacture the bags; more recently woven polypropylene has become the preferred material because of its superior strength. Earthbag & Papercrete Home: Hart House This is our first experimental earthbag dome. The interior diameter is 14 feet and the dome stands about 16 feet high. At first we tried filling the bags with the fine sand that it is built upon, but when we were partly done, the dome fell in because the sand couldn't hold the shape. Then we filled the bags with crushed volcanic rock (scoria) that provides better insulation and holds its shape much better.

How to Build Dirt Cheap Houses The following list summarizes some of the potential savings from using natural building materials and alternative construction methods. If you’re wondering why they’re not more widely used, it’s because contractors, banks, realtors and others in the housing industry make more profit from the current system. It’s up to you to get informed and switch to a sustainable lifestyle. 1. Organic Lawn Care For the Cheap and Lazy Lawn care in a nutshell: Must do: Set your mower as high as it will go (3 to 4 inches). Water only when your grass shows signs of drought stress and then water deeply (put a cup in your sprinkler zone and make sure it gets at least an inch of water). Optional: Fertilize with an organic fertilizer in the fall and spring. I recommend the Ringer brand. Have the pH of your soil professionally tested.

Earthbag House Plans - Tiny House Design Owen Geiger over at Earthbag House Plans has been busy. He has posted the preliminary designs for about 77 plans for earthbag homes available on his newest website. An earthbag home is essentially a home made from the dirt under your feet.

Tiny Earthbag Homes Constructing an earthbag home is considered by many to be the most inexpensive method of building a home simply because the material is free and usually already onsite. The major cost associated with earthbag homes are the bags used to hold the earth which makes up the structure. The most common type of bags used are solid-weave polypropylene. These bags typically hold rice and grain during shipment and can be reused for building an earthbag home. You can of course buy the bags new as well.

Low-Cost Multipurpose Earthbag Building - DIY Related Content Earth Building in Thailand I had heard there are thousands of new earthen houses in Thailand. That really amazed me, so I set o... The Shoebox Tiny house on wheels built by Tennessee Tiny Homes. Photographed by Butch Boyd.

Related:  Earth Home DesignsDIYExteriorFantasy home ideasArchitecture IIsydancingstarCool PicturesArchitectureINTERIOR DESIGNArchitecturedemain?INTERIORflowermasterpure awsomenessinvernaderos(green)