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Superadobe & Earthbags - What Is Superadobe?

Superadobe & Earthbags - What Is Superadobe?
Superadobe (sandbag and barbed wire) technology is a large, long adobe. It is a simple adobe, an instant and flexible line generator. It uses the materials of war for peaceful ends, integrating traditional earth architecture with contemporary global safety requirements. Long or short sandbags are filled with on-site earth and arranged in layers or long coils (compression) with strands of barbed wire placed between them to act as both mortar and reinforcement (tension). Stabilizers such as cement, lime, or asphalt emulsion may be added. This concept was originally presented by architect Nader Khalili to NASA for building habitats on the moon and Mars, as “Velcro-adobe”. Cal-Earth believes that the whole family should be able to build together, men and women, from grandma to the youngest child. The Superadobe can be coiled into vaults and domes, the way a potter coils a pot, with barbed wire reinforcement, to build structures which pass California’s earthquake codes. Related:  Earthbag BuildingEarthbag Home and ConstructionLeave no trace

Earthbag Construction EarthBag Homes - you're standing on the building materials... earthbag home Long sandbags are filled on-site and arranged in layers or as compressed coils. Stabilizers such as cement, lime, or sodium carbonate may be added to an ideal mix of 70% sand, 30% clay. earthbag home Plastic bags recycled into plastic bags -- if plastic does not break down for a thousand years, this building is sure to last several lifetimes. earthbag construction Foundations differ as per site. earthbag construction The time consuming part, filling the bags. earthbag construction Testing the strength of an arch. earthbag home Project Seres, Guatemala. projectseres.org, flickr.com earthbag home CalEarth -- Emergency Shelter Village, Hesperia, California. earthbag home Cal Earth -- Emergency Shelters. earthbag home CalEarth let the layers show. CalEarth -- this might not be totally earthbag, but like the fish face. earthbag home CalEarth photo by Mike Smith flickr.com CalEarth Vault under construction. Resources:

Earthbag & Papercrete Home: Hart House This is our first experimental earthbag dome. The interior diameter is 14 feet and the dome stands about 16 feet high. At first we tried filling the bags with the fine sand that it is built upon, but when we were partly done, the dome fell in because the sand couldn't hold the shape. Then we filled the bags with crushed volcanic rock (scoria) that provides better insulation and holds its shape much better. The arch over the doorway was created with a wooden form that was later removed. We kept the dome tarped most of the time until we papercreted the exterior. Here is the same dome as above, with joists in place for the loft and with the arch form still supporting the entrance arch. This is the beginning of the large elliptical dome that became our kitchen and living room. Because of the elliptical shape, this dome required a rigid pole framework to help support the second story. Here I am applying a coating of papercrete to the outside of the large dome.

Midwest Permaculture The History Of Earthbag Building A Short History of Earthbag Building by Kelly Hart The idea of making walls by stacking bags of sand or earth has been around for at least a century. At first natural materials such as burlap were used to manufacture the bags; more recently woven polypropylene has become the preferred material because of its superior strength. Because of this history of military and flood control, the use of sandbags has generally been associated with the construction of temporary structures or barriers. In 1976 Gernot Minke at the Research Laboratory for Experimental Building at Kassel Polytechnic College in Germany began to investigate the question of how natural building materials like sand and gravel could be used for building houses without the necessity of using binders. 1978, a prototype house using an earthquake-proof stacked-bag type of construction was built in Guatemala. In 2006, at the request of Dr.

Resources for Earthbag Building Suppliers of Bags Globally China Forest Packaging Group Co.,Ltd www.forestpackaging.com Tel: +86 151 656 64026 Fax:+86 536 827 3455 Bill Chen, Sales Manager chinaforestpackATgmail.com Bill Chen does communicate in English. This factory in China (and Cambodia) can provide a wide range of polypropylene bags, both as individually sewn bags, and as long tubes on a rolls. Standard 18"X30" bags run about $0.11US each and the longer 18"X34" bags are about $0.12 each. The long tubing in rolls are 3500 meters (11,150' or 2.2 miles) long. They can supply gussetted bags by special order, and it would be necessary to give them exact specifications for this. They need up to 30 days lead time to fill orders. We at earthbag.eu offer polypropylene bags and tubes: - Woven polypropylene bags, 70 x 140 centimeters available at 60 euro per 100 bags or 500 euro per 1.000 bags. - Woven polypropylene tubing, rolls of 225 meter x 66 centimeters wide available at 125 euro excluding VAT and shipping

Triple Dome Survival Shelter « Earthbag House Plans April 12, 2011 by Owen Geiger Triple Dome Survival Shelter (click to enlarge) Specifications: Three 16′ interior diameter domes with 603 sq. ft. interior, 3 sleeping lofts with 312 sq. ft., total 915 sq. ft. interior, one bedroom, one bath, Footprint: 38′ x 38′ Description: This Triple Dome Survival Shelter provides much more space than my first earthbag survival shelter. This design is for long term survival for a family. Like this: Like Loading... Transition Culture Low-Cost Multipurpose Earthbag Building - DIY Related Content Earth Building in Thailand I had heard there are thousands of new earthen houses in Thailand. That really amazed me, so I set o... One of the most practical structures on a small farmstead is a multipurpose building that can serve as a storage shed or cool pantry above ground, or as a root cellar or storm shelter below ground. You can build this multipurpose structure for about $300 using earthbag construction (bags filled with earth and stacked like bricks). In many cases, no building permit will be needed for this little building, because it’s below the minimum size required by most building codes (for structures that are not inhabited and not attached to a residence). Earthbag structures provide a cool space in summer and an escape from the cold in winter, which means this earthbag dome is well suited for many purposes. The earthbag dome has a natural look and blends in with the land. Building With Earthbags The cost of building with earthbags varies. Construction Cost

tv8point1.org Aims: We are an internet based "Television" production co-operative located in Lake County California. We at TV8point1.org recognize that we are on the cusp of a revolution in many areas, global economics, food supply, energy supply, human relationships, health care, sustainable living and the list goes on and on. We also realize that if we are to thrive in what is sure to be a maelstrom over the next few years, we must prepare ourselves now. It is to this end that the all volunteer staff of TV8point1.org has launched it's campaign to "Make Connections and Build Community". Inspiration: The founders of tv8point1.org began this project at our local PEG access channel provided by Mediacom and administered by the City of Clearlake. Outcomes so far: To date we have forged a working relationship with the PEG access channel and our live content is aired county-wide. Unexpected outcomes: Obstacles, and how we overcame them: Lessons learned: Links and partnerships: Sources of funding:

How to Build an Earthbag Dome Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, first read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building Instructable and How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse . Also, my new Earthbag Building Guide and Earthbag Building DVD are now available. We built this earthbag dome at our home in Thailand for Mother Earth News Magazine in 2007. The article that describes the complete building process in detail was published August/September 2009. It is now free on the Internet: Low-Cost Multipurpose Minibuilding Made With Earthbags , by Owen Geiger. This earthbag dome Instructable simplifies the process and illustrates each step of construction with photos. This multi-purpose dome can serve as a storage shed or cool pantry above ground, or as a rootcellar or storm shelter below ground. The key concept that makes earthbag domes work is corbelling.

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