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Kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram

Kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram
David Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory (ELT) Having developed the model over many years prior, David Kolb published his learning styles model in 1984. The model gave rise to related terms such as Kolb's experiential learning theory (ELT), and Kolb's learning styles inventory (LSI). In his publications - notably his 1984 book 'Experiential Learning: Experience As The Source Of Learning And Development' Kolb acknowledges the early work on experiential learning by others in the 1900's, including Rogers, Jung, and Piaget. In turn, Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory are today acknowledged by academics, teachers, managers and trainers as truly seminal works; fundamental concepts towards our understanding and explaining human learning behaviour, and towards helping others to learn. See also Gardner's Multiple Intelligences and VAK learnings styles models, which assist in understanding and using Kolb's learning styles concepts. see also

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Teaching and Learning Resources / Andragogy Just as there is no one theory that explains how humans learn, no single theory of adult learning has emerged to unify the field. The best known theory of adult learning is Knowles’ andragogy. As a teacher, writer, and leader in the field of adult education, Knowles was an innovator, responding to the needs of the field as he perceived them and, as such, he was a key figure in the growth and practice of adult education throughout the Western world. Kolb Learning Cycle Tutorial - Static Version Text and concept by Clara Davies (SDDU, University of Leeds) Tutorial design by Tony Lowe (LDU, UNversity of Leeds) Multimedia version (Flash plug-in required). Introduction Reflective practice is important to the development of lecturers as professionals as it enables us to learn from our experiences of teaching and facilitating student learning. Developing reflective practice means developing ways of reviewing our own teaching so that it becomes a routine and a process by which we might continuously develop. Kolb developed a theory of experiential learning that can give us a useful model by which to develop our practice.

Students are not hard-wired to learn in different ways – we need to stop using unproven, harmful methods In our series, Better Teachers, we’ll explore how to improve teacher education in Australia. We’ll look at what the evidence says on a range of themes including how to raise the status of the profession and measure and improve teacher quality. In health there are well-established protocols that govern the introduction of any new drug or treatment.

A Clever Trick to Play YouTube Videos without Distractive Features YouTube is both a video resource for educational clips to use with your students in the classroom and also a robust video editor to work on your clips before you share them with the world. Recently some extra useful services have been added to YouTube such as creating presentations with audio embedded in them, and live streaming a Google Plus hangout. However, while YouTube is free for everyone to use, it comes with another cost. Those annoying ads forced at you every time you want to watch a video together with the "recommended videos " for you, are part of the cost users pay for using the service. Using YouTube videos with students means that you might run the risk of exposing them to inappropriate and distractive content that comes in the featured playlist to the left of the video.

Emotional Intelligence theories - Daniel Goleman's EQ concepts This webpage is a new format for mobile/small screens. Please send your feedback if it fails to operate well. Thanks. emotional intelligence theory (EQ - Emotional Quotient) Emotional Intelligence - EQ - is a relatively recent behavioural model, rising to prominence with Daniel Goleman's 1995 Book called 'Emotional Intelligence'.

John Hattie & Helen Timperley: Visible Learning and Feedback Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement. But research has also shown that this impact can be either positive or negative. Although feedback is among the major influences, the type of feedback and the way it is given can be differentially effective. John Hattie discusses this fact extensively in his book “Visible Learning for Teachers (2012)” and Helen Timperley contributes the “Feedback” chapter to the compendium “International Guide To Student Achievement (2013)” by Hattie and Anderman. The most powerful single influence enhancing achievement is feedback In an often cited article from 2007 Hattie and Timperley provide a conceptual analysis of feedback and analyse the evidence related to its impact on learning and student achievement.

Differentiating Your Classroom with Ease - The Brown Bag Teacher For me, differentiating no longer means creating separate games/activities/learning targets. It doesn't mean that some students do more work or students are being taught different content. It does mean tweaking activities, so they have the just-right scaffolds and pushes for my students. To me - right now - differentiation means... Believing these things, our team has developed structures and organization to help us be intentional in our planning. "We don't know what we don't know" - So what can we do about it? In my work I often hear the following... We don't know what we don't know Seems fair enough, right? I always thought so, but recently (after hearing it a lot) I've really be pondering this statement and am starting to wonder if it could, sometimes, just be an excuse. I wouldn't say it's intentional, but thinking about my time as an educator, I've always wanted to improve my practice and find new and interesting ways for my students (whether they are teenagers or adults) to learn. So is there a way for us to find out what we don't know other than having someone come and tell us through PD in our school or going to a conference?

How Good Are Your Leadership Skills? - Leadership Training from MindTools What's your key area for improvement? © iStockphoto/hidesy Who do you consider to be a good leader? Maybe it's a politician, a famous businessperson, or a religious figure. Or maybe it's someone you know personally – like your boss, a teacher, or a friend. You can find people in leadership roles almost everywhere you look.

Creating Writing Assignments: Taxonomy of Objectives Bloom et al.’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives for the Cognitive Domain (1956) (with Outcome-Illustrating Verbs)* Designing Assignments Exercise in Assignment Design Using Bloom’s Taxonomy Knowledge Remembering (recalling) appropriate, previously learned information, such as terminology or specific facts.

7 Neuroscience Fundamentals For Instructional Designers - eLearning Industry The brain is a beautiful thing. It's also one of the most complex and complicated structures known to man. Every emotion, thought, and memory involves countless chemical reactions and neural pathways.

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