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Theory & Pedagogy

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What Kind Of Student Should School Produce? - 6 Questions Students Can Use To Guide Their Inquiry-Based Learning - 6 Questions Students Can Use To Guide Their Inquiry-Based Learning by Ashley McCann.

6 Questions Students Can Use To Guide Their Inquiry-Based Learning -

4 Things All Project-Based Learning Teachers Should Do. 4 Things All Project-Based Learning Teachers Should Do by Lauren Ayer, M.Ed.

4 Things All Project-Based Learning Teachers Should Do

10 Benefits Of Inquiry-Based Learning. How Action Research Sparks Innovation and Boosts Creativity in the Classroom – John Spencer. If you like this video, please click “like” and subscribe to my channel.

How Action Research Sparks Innovation and Boosts Creativity in the Classroom – John Spencer

5 Absurd Myths About Critical Thinking - 5 Absurd Myths About Critical Thinking.

5 Absurd Myths About Critical Thinking -

20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching - 20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching by TeachThought Staff What makes an effective teacher?

20 Observable Characteristics Of Effective Teaching -

Tapping Into the Adolescent Need For Purpose to Motivate Learners. Teenagers can be a prickly bunch, and getting them invested in learning about algebraic equations, metaphor and simile or American History can seem like an impossible task to many teachers required to teach those topics.

Tapping Into the Adolescent Need For Purpose to Motivate Learners

At the same time, teens are often derided for their “unformed brains” that lead them to make risky decisions and make it difficult for them to control their emotions. Much of the writing on adolescents makes this group out to be a nightmare to teach, but the more researchers learn about what drives teens, the more complicated that picture becomes. Amanda Ripley dives into research showing how the teen brain can be a double-edged sword when it comes to decision making and learning in her New York Times article: The brains of adolescents are notoriously more receptive to short-term rewards and peer approval, which can lead to risky behavior.

8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started - 14 Messages Every Student Needs To Hear From You - 14 Messages Every Student Needs To Hear From You by Terry Heick Okay–quick post on the kinds of messages that can disarm the teacher-student (or school-student) relations and help build relationships with students that last. 1.

14 Messages Every Student Needs To Hear From You -

It’s not how much you know, but what you do with what you know. This is tough to wrap your head around, but once you do it can change everything. 2. And this classroom is a place I’ve created for you. 3. So you and I aren’t going to use it anymore. 4. You truly belong here–right here, right now, with me. 5. 6 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning. Project-based learning (PBL) naturally lends itself to differentiated instruction.

6 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning

By design, it is student-centered, student-driven, and gives space for teachers to meet the needs of students in a variety of ways. PBL can allow for effective differentiation in assessment as well as daily management and instruction. Five Ways to Engage Reluctant Learners – John Spencer. I am currently on my fifth solid day of doing things that I find difficult, scary, or boring.

Five Ways to Engage Reluctant Learners – John Spencer

Two days ago, I called the cable company to set up my internet. This might not seem like a big deal, but I am terrified of phone calls — especially to strangers. Although I hate conflict, I engaged in a negotiation. Another example: I pretty much live in my head. I work well in the area of ideas. I mention this because I often spend my time doing things that I love doing. And yet . . . Social Justice Projects in the Classroom. Ferguson, Baltimore, Cleveland, New Orleans: these cities have become synonymous with racial intolerance and symbols of what's wrong with race relations in our country.

Social Justice Projects in the Classroom

As educators, we're charged with preparing our students to be successful in life and productive members of society. But with all the focus on standardized tests and core curriculum, we've forgotten that the concept of literacy should also include culture and tolerance of diverse people and backgrounds. One of the best ways to develop cultural literacy and help our students understand these goals is through social justice processes and projects, activities that develop a mindset of concern for our society's inequity in wealth, education, and privilege.

10 Reasons Every Teacher Needs A Professional Learning Network - 10 Reasons Every Teacher Needs A Professional Learning Network by TeachThought Staff What’s a professional learning network? According to Marc-André Lalande, “a Personal Learning Network is a way of describing the group of people that you connect with to learn their ideas, their questions, their reflections, and their references.

Your PLN is not limited to online interactions, but it is that online, global interactive part that really makes it special. A 3 Dimensional Model Of Bloom's Taxonomy - A 3-Dimensional Model Of Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Well, technically it’s a 2-dimensional representation of a 3-dimensional model, but being limited as we are in 2016 to 2D screens, it is what it is.

(Soon you’ll be able to 3D print what you see–download the plans and print it. Digital Promise Puts Education Research All In One Place. As technology becomes an accepted tool in many classrooms, teachers and administrators are looking for the best ed-tech tools to advance their goals around student learning. Unfortunately, there are so many tools on the market claiming to be the best option, it can be hard to sort through the noise and make an informed decision. Digital Promise, the congressionally authorized nonprofit charged with “accelerating innovation in education to improve opportunities to learn,” has developed a tool to help educators and ed-tech developers sort through relevant research. “There is more and more pressure for people to use research in their work,” said Sarita Bhargava, chief communications officer for Digital Promise.

“We hope this tool will provide the first step.” A Diagram Of Pedagogy in the 21st Century - TeachThought: A Diagram Of Pedagogy in the 21st Century by Terry Heick We know that thinking in the 21st century seems different. What about teaching? Aside from the presence of dizzying technologies, added pressure for data-based improvements, and a persistent call for innovation, how is teaching different in 2016 than it was in, say, 1984? Here are a few ideas as a kind of quick overview, with general summaries for each. 8 Domains Of 21st Century Pedagogy.

12 Things That Will Disappear From Classrooms In The Next 12 Years. A Linear Scale For Critical Literacy. A Linear Scale For Critical Literacy by Terry Heick Phonemic awareness is knowing that certain letters make certain sounds. Phonemic awareness is knowing that sounds can blend together in predictable and unpredictable ways. Phonemic awareness is about loving the sounds that letters can make, and maybe noticing common patterns across symbols, media, and languages. Phonemic awareness makes decoding possible. Decoding is being able to blend sounds together to ‘make’ words you recognize. Decoding is collecting as many words as possible into your ‘sight word bank’ to increase your reading speed and comprehension. Decoding is recognizing common word parts used in many words, and using knowledge of those parts to predict the meaning of unfamiliar words. Are We Missing the Point with Digital Citizenship? Oakland Schools Literacy. By Hattie Maguire.

Henry James and H.G. Well’s Famous Feud About Writing, the Purpose of Art, and the Usefulness of Literature. “What art does is to coax us away from the mechanical and towards the miraculous,” Jeanette Winterson wrote in 2006. A century earlier, two of literature’s most revered titans clashed on this question of what art does, and the debris became the soil in which nearly every contemporary debate about the purpose of creative work grows. Henry James (April 13, 1843–February 28, 1916) and H.G. Wells (September 21, 1866–August 13, 1946) were a generation apart, but had much in common — both championed freedom of speech, had strong political views, and wrote incisive social commentary; both were nominated for the Nobel Prize several times but never won.

And yet, despite their commonalities, the two writers collided on the subject at the center of their work — the nature of purpose of art, including literature. Their contrasting views capture a divide that continues to bedevil creative culture today. Top 10 Tools for a Free Online Education. Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average' : NPR Ed. Three Examples of Students Creating Real-World Products to Solve Problems That Mattered to Them.

In many of my presentations I try to make the point that "real world" problems are whatever problems that matter to students. Helping Students Write Beautiful Words. Writing that people choose to read. That is what I’m after. Is it perfect? The 10 Skills Modern Teachers Must Have. Modern Professional Learning: Connecting PLCs With PLNs. Great teaching knowledge dies every day.