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5 Secrets To A ‘No-Work’ Garden

5 Secrets To A ‘No-Work’ Garden
It took over 20 years of gardening to realize that I didn’t have to work so hard to achieve a fruitful harvest. As the limitless energy of my youth gradually gave way to the physical realities of mid-life, the slow accretion of experience eventually led to an awareness that less work can result in greater crop yields. Inspired in part by Masanobu Fukuoka’s book, One Straw Revolution, my family experimented with gardening methods which could increase yields with less effort. Fukuoka spent over three decades perfecting his so-called “do-nothing” technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort. Here are the strategies we used which enabled us to greatly increase our garden yield, while requiring less time and less work. 1. With ‘no-till’ gardening, weeding is largely eliminated. 2. Gardeners are always on the lookout for free sources of clean organic mulch to add to their garden.

http://eartheasy.com/blog/2011/04/5-secrets-to-a-%e2%80%98no-work%e2%80%99-garden/

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No-till Gardening Gardeners traditionally dig, or turn over the top layer of soil before planting to get rid of weeds, and make it easier to use fertilizers and to plant crops. This also speeds up the decomposition of crop residue, weeds and other organic matter. Tilling the soil is often the most strenuous of a gardener’s tasks. A complex, symbiotic relationship exists between the soil surface and the underlying micro-organisms, however, which contributes to a natural, healthy soil structure. Digging into the bed can interfere with this process and disturb the natural growing environment. It can also cause soil compaction and erosion, and bring dormant weed seeds to the surface where they will sprout.

How 1 MILLION Pounds Of Organic Food Can Be Produced On 3 Acres By Andy Whiteley Co-Founder of Wake Up World The quality and accessibility of our food supply is a mounting issue today. With GMOs, chemical pesticides and low-nutrition processed foods now commonplace in the mainstream supply, taking control of your own food supply is one of the smartest things you can do – for your health and for your hip pocket. OSCAR - Open Source Simple Computer for Agriculture in Rural Areas Our main sources of inspiration for this project. The philosophy of free software advocated by GNU and a hardware open source initiative by Simputer Trust sparked the basic idea for an open source project. www.gnu.org

Vertical Gardening Techniques for Maximum Returns - Organic Gardening Related Content 10 Tips for a Tiny Balcony Think your balcony's too tiny to provide food and fun? Check out Apartment Therapy's great tips for ... Whether your garden is large or small, you can make better use of every square inch by using vertical gardening techniques to grow upright crops.

Transparent Bubble Tents Posted on November 24, 2010 by saya These Transparent Bubble Tents encourage users to have a closer contact with the nature. Totally transparent, the new tent not only provides beautiful sceneries but also offers smart beds, cabinets, shelves and even electric lighting for use. To sum up, it’s really the best tent designed for those who love waiting for the stars. Designer: Pierre Stephane Dumas Selling Price: $11914 Homemade Hummingbird Nectar Recipe Attracting Wild Birds No need to buy the powdered Hummingbird Nectar mix from the store for this rewarding hobby. Instead, make your with this simple hummingbird nectar recipe. You only need water and white sugar – super simple and easy to make.

How to Grow Garlic: Organic Gardening Soil preparation: Garlic will tolerate some shade but prefers full sun. While I've seen cloves sprout in gravel pits, garlic responds best in well-drained, rich, loamy soil amended with lots of organic matter. Raised beds are ideal, except in very dry regions. Backyard Vegetable Garden While it may seem like a lot of work to get the beds established for planting, this can be done in stages. You can start with a small plot and enlarge the garden as time and inspiration allow. Remember, the bulk of the work, establishing the beds, only has to be done once.

stillphotos Still Photos of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds Page One Page Two Page three Page Four 10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests 10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests Please be sure to Join our email list and receive all our latest and best tutorials daily – free! Background photo – Yummifruitbat (Wikipedia) lic. under CC 2.5 We’ve been doing some research into plants that repel pests and have compiled a list of 10 plants that can be planted together with other plants as a simple form of insect control. The idea of selecting plants for insect control is not a new one – and is part of the overall subject of companion planting. Companion planting has actually been in use since ancient times; for example the mosquito fern has been planted alongside rice in China for over 1000 years in order to assist with nitrogen fixing and the crowding out of other weeds.

Gardening in a drought Guest post by Mark M. NOTE: This may be something to print out and store in your SurvivalMom Binder for future reference. image by International Center for Tropical Agriculture I have lived in many countries over the years, and have always had a vegetable garden. Not just for cost, as many of the countries I have lived in have had what we considered dirt cheap food, but for the quality. Nothing compares to the taste of veggies fresh from the garden. How to: create a Planting Calendar, Allsun style I must say that while I’m finding this market garden experiment very exciting, it’s also rather daunting. What are we planting today? What are we planting next week? Where are we going? Who am i and where are my pants?

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