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Free for All: NYPL Enhances Public Domain Collections For Sharing and Reuse

Free for All: NYPL Enhances Public Domain Collections For Sharing and Reuse
Today we are proud to announce that out-of-copyright materials in NYPL Digital Collections are now available as high-resolution downloads. No permission required, no hoops to jump through: just go forth and reuse! The release of more than 180,000 digitized items represents both a simplification and an enhancement of digital access to a trove of unique and rare materials: a removal of administration fees and processes from public domain content, and also improvements to interfaces — popular and technical — to the digital assets themselves. Online users of the NYPL Digital Collections website will find more prominent download links and filters highlighting restriction-free content; while more technically inclined users will also benefit from updates to the Digital Collections API enabling bulk use and analysis, as well as data exports and utilities posted to NYPL's GitHub account. We've made it easier than ever to search, browse, and download public domain items in Digital Collections.

http://www.nypl.org/blog/2016/01/05/share-public-domain-collections

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Yuval Noah Harari: ‘Homo sapiens as we know them will disappear in a century or so’ Last week, on his Radio 2 breakfast show, Chris Evans read out the first page of Sapiens, the book by the Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari. Given that radio audiences at that time in the morning are not known for their appetite for intellectual engagement – the previous segment had dealt with Gary Barlow’s new tour – it was an unusual gesture. But as Evans said, “the first page is the most stunning first page of any book”. If DJs are prone to mindless hyperbole, this was an honourable exception. The subtitle of Sapiens, in an echo of Stephen Hawking’s great work, is A Brief History of Humankind. In grippingly lucid prose, Harari sets out on that first page a condensed history of the universe, followed by a summary of the book’s thesis: how the cognitive revolution, the agricultural revolution and the scientific revolution have affected humans and their fellow organisms.

Why some people find learning a language harder than others Scientists at McGill University in Canada found that if left anterior operculum and the left superior temporal gyrus communicate more with each other at rest, then language learning is easier. "These findings have implications for predicting language learning success and failure," said study author Dr Xiaoqian Chai. For the study, researchers scanned the brains of 15 adult English speakers who were about to begin an intensive 12-week French course, and then tested their language abilities both before and after the course. Participants with stronger connections between the left left anterior operculum and an important region of the brain's language network called the left superior temporal gyrus showed greater improvement in the speaking test. However, that doesn't mean success at a second language is entirely predetermined by the brain's wiring.

L.I.F.T. – an effective writing-proficiency and metacognition enhancer Many years ago, as an L2 college student writer of English and French I often had doubts about the accuracy of what I wrote in my essays, especially when I was trying out a new and complex grammar structure or an idiom I had heard someone use. However, the busy and under-paid native-speaker university language assistants charged with correcting my essays rarely gave me useful feedback on those adventurous linguistic exploits of mine. They simply underlined or crossed out my mistakes and provided their correct alternative. As an inquisitive and demanding language learner I was not satisfied. I wanted more. So, I decided to try out a different approach; in every essay of mine I asked my teachers questions about things I was not sure about, in annotations I would write in the margin of my essays (e.g. should I use ‘with’ or ‘by’ here?

Icon Paradise - Iconfinder.com Essential Collection ( 500 Free icons collection for Commercial Use and Personal ) 500 icons These are Outline line icons Collection that designed on detail straight and Rounded line style which Pixel perfect Grid. All vector icons based on 32px grid, Icons are also a good choice to use in Mobile app , Web Project and etc.. Color Line Icons Collection 175 icons These are Color line icons Collection that designed on detail straight line style which Pixel perfect Grid. All vector icons based on 64px grid, Icons are also a good choice to use in web projects etc..

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School Start 1-6 Beginner, Elementary, Themes Related Page: My Book About Me Warm-up Welcome Back to School! – Animated Digital Card Funny starter welcoming you back to school (yr 1-4)Kid Snippets: “Back to School” Adults act to child voices. Funny if the students know the body parts (yr 3-5)Back to School – The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (PARODY) A song to start the term with (yr 4-6) Sorry, Ebooks. These 9 Studies Show Why Print Is Better Don’t lament the lost days of cutting your fingers on pristine new novels or catching a whiff of that magical, transportive old book smell just yet! A slew of recent studies shows that print books are still popular, even among millennials. What’s more: further research suggests that this trend may save demonstrably successful learning habits from certain death. Take comfort in these 9 studies that show that print books have a promising future: Younger people are more likely to believe that there’s useful information that’s only available offline.

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