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Getting Things Done

Getting Things Done
The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows one to focus attention on taking action on tasks, instead of on recalling them. First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade and incorporate recent scientific research supporting the system's claims regarding how the mind functions.[2] Themes[edit] Allen first demonstrates stress reduction from the method with the following exercise, centered on something that has entered your life that has an unclear outcome or where the next action is not defined. (Allen calls these sources of stress "open loops," "incompletes," or "stuff.")[1]:13 Pick an "incomplete": What most annoys, distracts, or interests you? Workflow[edit] Next, reflection (termed planning in the first edition) occurs. Implementation[edit] Summary[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Getting_Things_Done

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Getting started with "Getting Things Done" This article was originally posted during the first week of 43 Folders' existence, and, pound for pound, it remains our most popular page on the site. Please be sure to also visit related pages, browse our GTD topic area, plus, of course you can search on GTD across our family of sites. I’ll be talking a lot here in coming weeks about Getting Things Done, a book by David Allen whose apt subtitle is “The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.” You’ve probably heard about it around the Global Interweb or have been buttonholed by somebody in your office who swears by GTD. (It probably takes a backseat only to the Atkins Diet in terms of the number of enthusiastic evangelists: sorry about that.)

Google Calendar Google Calendar is a free time-management web application offered by Google. It became available on April 13, 2006, and exited the beta stage in July 2009. Users are required to have a Google Account in order to use the software. Features[edit] Interface[edit] A Short History Of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson "'A fascinating idea, and I can't think of many writers, other than Bryson, who would do it this well. It's the sort of book I would have devoured as a teenager. It might well turn unsuspecting young readers into scientists. And the famous, slightly cynical humour is always there.'" - Evening Standard "'A genuinely useful and readable book.

SlideShare The website gets an estimated 58 million unique visitors a month,[7] and has about 16 million registered users.[citation needed] SlideShare was voted among the World's Top 10 tools for education & e-learning in 2010.[8][9] SlideShare's biggest competitors include Scribd.com, Issuu and Docstoc. Some of the notable users of SlideShare include The White House, NASA, World Economic Forum, State of Utah, O'Reilly Media, Hewlett Packard and IBM. §Zipcasts[edit] In February 2011 SlideShare added a feature called Zipcasts.[10] A Zipcast is a social web conferencing system that allows presenters to broadcast an audio/video feed while driving the presentation through the Internet.

Hipster PDA Although it began as a joke, or perhaps a statement about technology fetishism, the Hipster PDA has rapidly gained popularity with serious users,[4] with hundreds posting pictures of their customized hPDAs on photo sharing sites and exchanging tips on Internet mailing lists. Advocates of the hPDA claim that it is a cheap, lightweight, freeform organizer[5] that doesn't need batteries and is unlikely to be stolen. Enthusiasts also design and share index-card-size printable templates for storing contacts, to-do lists, calendars, notes, project plans, and so on. A Hipster Nano PDA utilizes business cards with blank backs and one that has a calendar on the back.

29 Ways to Beat Procrastination Once and For All We all procrastinate. Sometimes it’s not a bad thing, but it can turn into something evil and nasty if we aren’t careful. Try these procrastination beating techniques to destroy this deadly foe once and for all. Calendaring software Calendaring software is software that minimally provides users with an electronic version of a calendar. Additionally, the software may provide an appointment book, address book, and/or contact list. These tools are an extension of many of the features provided by time management software such as desk accessory packages and computer office automation systems. Calendaring is a standard feature of many PDAs, EDAs, and smartphones. The software may be a local package designed for individual use (e.g. Lightning extension for Mozilla Thunderbird, Microsoft Outlook without Exchange Server, or Windows Calendar) or may be a networked package that allows for the sharing of information between users (e.g.

The Australian Editing Handbook, 3rd Edition - Elizabeth Flann, Beryl Hill, Lan Wang Edit with confidence across all media The fully revised and updated third edition of The Australian Editing Handbook is a comprehensive guide to successfully navigating the changes and challenges facing editors today. This definitive resource helps beginning editors, students of editing and publishing, or any editor seeking to learn more about a specific aspect of editing, such as ebooks. Today, editors need to be able to respond to the demands of working with current and emerging technologies. While they are also editing a wider range of media, including ebooks, websites and tablet applications, the essential role of the editor is as important as ever and remains an integral part of the publishing process.

Prezi Prezi is a cloud-based (SaaS) presentation software and storytelling tool for presenting ideas on a virtual canvas.[1][2][3][4][5] The product employs a zooming user interface (ZUI), which allows users to zoom in and out of their presentation media, and allows users to display and navigate through information within a 2.5D or parallax 3D space on the Z-axis. Prezi was officially established in 2009 by co-founders Adam Somlai-Fischer, Peter Halacsy and Peter Arvai. History[edit] Prezi (or Prezi.com) was created by the support of Kitchen Budapest and Magyar Telekom in 2008 in order to replace the ordinary slide based presentations. Today the project is assisted by Sunstone Capital. Yes. Another Backup Lecture. Daring Fireball: An Ode to DiskWarrior, SuperDuper, and Dropbox Hard drives are fragile. Read as much as you can bear to about how they work, how incredibly precisely they must operate in order to cram so many bits onto such small disks. It’s a miracle to me that they work at all. Every hard drive in the world will eventually fail. Assume that yours are all on the cusp of failure at all times.

5 Time management tricks I learned from years of hating Tim Ferriss I have hated Tim Ferriss for a long time. I have hated him since we both had editors at Crown Publishing who sat next to each other and I heard how difficult he is. I didn’t blog about it because first of all, I’m sure the buzz about me is that I’m difficult, too. And also, his book, The 4-Hour Workweek, was a bestseller and mine wasn’t. So I figured people would say that I’m jealous. Etherpad Etherpad (previously known as EtherPad)[1][2] is a web-based collaborative real-time editor, allowing authors to simultaneously edit a text document, and see all of the participants' edits in real-time, with the ability to display each author's text in their own color. There is also a chat box in the sidebar to allow meta communication. First launched in November 2008, the software was acquired by Google in December 2009 and released as open source later that month. Several services now use the Etherpad software, including PiratePad, Telecomix Pad, Framapad, Mozilla Pad (MoPad), PrimaryPad, QikPad, and TitanPad. Further development is coordinated by the Etherpad Foundation.

Reliable Knowledge Why believe in the findings of science? John Ziman argues that scientific knowledge is not uniformly reliable, but rather like a map representing a country we cannot visit. He shows how science has many elements, including alongside its experiments and formulae the language and logic, patterns and preconceptions, facts and fantasies used to illustrate and express its findings. These elements are variously combined by scientists in their explanations of the material world as it lies outside our everyday experience. John Ziman's book offers at once a valuably clear account and a radically challenging investigation of the credibility of scientific knowledge, searching widely across a range of disciplines for evidence about the perceptions, paradigms and analogies on which all our understanding depends.

Related:  Project, Task, Time ManagementGTDGetting Things DoneTime Management