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Collaborative real-time editor

Collaborative real-time editor
A collaborative editor is a form of collaborative software application that allows several people to edit a computer file using different computers, a practice called collaborative editing. There are two types of collaborative editing: real-time and non-real-time. In real-time collaborative editing (RTCE), users can edit the same file simultaneously, whereas in Non-real-time collaborative editing, the users do not edit the same file at the same time (similar to revision control systems). Collaborative real-time editors generally permit both the above modes of editing in any given instance. History[edit] The first instance of a collaborative real-time editor was demonstrated by Douglas Engelbart in 1968, in The Mother of All Demos. Instant Update was released for Mac OS in 1991 from ON Technology.[1] Later, a version for Microsoft Windows was released as well, allowing real-time collaboration across these two operating systems. Technical challenges[edit] Recent developments[edit] Related:  La rete siamo noiPresentations ACEO/BALEC Recommended TOOLS

List of collaborative software This list is divided into proprietary or free software, and open source software, with several comparison tables among different product and vendors characteristics. It also includes a section of project collaboration software, which are combining with cloud computing services to become a standard feature in an emerging category of computer software: collaboration platforms. There may be some overlap between this list and the list of wiki software. Collaborative software[edit] The following are software applications or solutions including free software: Comparison of notable software[edit] General Information[edit] Comparison of unified communications features[edit] Comparison of collaborative software features[edit] Comparison of targets[edit] Open source software[edit] The following are open source applications for collaboration: Standard client–server software[edit] Groupware: Web based software[edit] Other[edit] Project collaboration software[edit] Web-based software[edit] Other[edit]

Etherpad Etherpad (previously known as EtherPad)[1][2] is a web-based collaborative real-time editor, allowing authors to simultaneously edit a text document, and see all of the participants' edits in real-time, with the ability to display each author's text in their own color. There is also a chat box in the sidebar to allow meta communication. First launched in November 2008, the software was acquired by Google in December 2009 and released as open source later that month. Several services now use the Etherpad software, including PiratePad, Telecomix Pad, Framapad, Mozilla Pad (MoPad), PrimaryPad, QikPad, and TitanPad. Features and implementation[edit] Anyone can create a new collaborative document, known as a "pad". The software auto-saves the document at regular, short intervals, but participants can permanently save specific versions (checkpoints) at any time. Automated markup of JavaScript code was made available shortly after the launch. Launch[edit] Acquisition[edit] Open-source[edit]

Aloha Editor - HTML5 WYSIWYG Editor Google Drive Google Drive is a file storage and synchronization service provided by Google, released on April 24, 2012,[4][5] which enables user cloud storage, file sharing and collaborative editing. Rumors about Google Drive began circulating as early as March 2006.[6] Files shared publicly on Google Drive can be searched with web search engines. Google Drive is the home of Google Docs, an office suite of productivity applications, that offer collaborative editing on documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and more. Storage[edit] Google offers all users an initial 15 GB of online storage space, that is shared across three of its most-used services: Google Drive, Gmail, and Google+ Photos[7] (aka Picasa Web Albums).[8] Users can upgrade their free 15 GB account through a paid monthly subscription plan to get additional storage.[8] Documents using Google Docs native formats (including .gdoc, .gslides, and .gsheet) do not count towards this quota. Client[edit] Features[edit] Third-party apps[edit]

Mindmapping, concept mapping and information organisation software Calendaring software Calendaring software is software that minimally provides users with an electronic version of a calendar. Additionally, the software may provide an appointment book, address book, and/or contact list. These tools are an extension of many of the features provided by time management software such as desk accessory packages and computer office automation systems. Calendaring is a standard feature of many PDAs, EDAs, and smartphones. The software may be a local package designed for individual use (e.g. Features[edit] Calendaring software will contain one or more of the following features: Examples[edit] See also[edit] External links[edit]

Brainch Main Page Google Docs An example of a document in Google Docs Google Docs is a free, web-based office suite offered by Google within its Google Drive service. It was formerly a storage service as well, but has since been replaced by Google Drive.[3] It allows users to create and edit documents online while collaborating with other users live. Google Docs combines the features of Writely and Spreadsheets with a presentation program incorporating technology designed by Tonic Systems. Data storage of files was introduced on January 12, 2010 with 1 GB of free space. History[edit] Writely's beta logo Google Docs originated from two separate products, Writely and Google Spreadsheets. Spreadsheets, launched as Google Labs Spreadsheets on June 6, 2006,[7] originated from the acquisition of the XL2Web product by 2Web Technologies. Writely originally ran on Microsoft ASP.NET technology which uses Microsoft Windows. In February 2007, Google Docs was made available to Google Apps users. Features[edit] File limits[edit]

List of concept- and mind-mapping software Concept-mapping and mind-mapping software are used to create diagrams of relationships between concepts, ideas or other pieces of information. It has been suggested that the mind mapping technique can improve learning/study efficiency up to 15% over conventional note taking.[1] There are a number of software packages and websites that allow the creation of, or otherwise support mind maps. File format[edit] Using a standard file format allows interchange of files between various programs. Free Software[edit] The following tools are free as defined by the Free Software Foundation. Freeware[edit] The following is a list of notable concept mapping and mind mapping applications which are freeware (they are available at no cost). Paid software[edit] The table below lists pieces of paid commercial software that allow the creation of mind maps and concept maps. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Google Calendar Google Calendar is a free time-management web application offered by Google. It became available on April 13, 2006, and exited the beta stage in July 2009. Users are required to have a Google Account in order to use the software. Features[edit] Interface[edit] Content access[edit] Events are stored online; consequently, the calendar can be viewed from any location that has Internet access. Sharing calendars[edit] Google Calendar allows multiple calendars to be created and shown in the same view. Device synchronization[edit] Google integration[edit] Google Calendar is integrated with various other Google services: Gmail, Google's webmail service. 2009 introduction[edit] On March 4, 2009, Google Calendar began offering offline support.[7] On May 13, 2009, Google Calendar began offering to-do lists,[8][9] via Google Tasks. Compatibility[edit] Consistency and reliability[edit] As in other cloud computing applications, changes to Google Calendar are immediately visible to all users. See also[edit]

Penflip - collaborative writing and version control Getting Things Done The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows one to focus attention on taking action on tasks, instead of recalling them. First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade and incorporate recent scientific research supporting the system's claims regarding how the mind functions.[2] Themes[edit] Allen first demonstrates stress reduction from the method with the following exercise, centered on a task that has an unclear outcome or whose next action is not defined. Allen calls these sources of stress "open loops", "incompletes", or "stuff".[1]:13 Pick an "incomplete": What most annoys, distracts, or interests you? Workflow[edit] Logic tree diagram illustrating the second and third steps (process/clarify and organize) of the five-step Getting Things Done workflow.

Online Meeting Software and Real-time Collaboration - iLinc for Meetings Intuitive and interactive, iLinc’s online meeting software helps everyone from individuals to enterprises host the most successful virtual meetings. From the seamless Salesforce.com integration to the interactive whiteboarding capabilities, iLinc for Meetings delivers must-have tools to enhance online collaboration and improve meeting efficiency. Whether it’s regrouping with remote staff or checking up on geographically dispersed customers, iLinc offers a fast and flexible web and video conferencing solution to refine business operations and productivity – saving you time and money. Here just some of the things you can do with iLinc for Meetings iLinc’s rigorous security protections ensure that your data, processes, and network are never compromised during a virtual presentation. The patented Green Meter application within the iLinc web conferencing software automatically tracks cost savings and environmental impact avoided so you can prove ROI from meeting online.

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