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Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world

Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, first published in 1989, is a business and self-help book written by Stephen R. Covey.[1] Covey presents an approach to being effective in attaining goals by aligning oneself to what he calls "true north" principles of a character ethic that he presents as universal and timeless. The 7 Habits[edit] The book first introduces the concept of paradigm shift and helps the reader understand that different perspectives exist, i.e. that two people can see the same thing and yet differ with each other. On this premise, it introduces the seven habits in a proper order. Each chapter is dedicated to one of the habits, which are represented by the following imperatives: Independence[edit] The First Three Habits surround moving from dependence to independence (i.e., self-mastery): 1 - Be Proactive roles and relationships in life. 2 - Begin with the End in Mind envision what you want in the future so that you know concretely what to make a reality. 4 - Think Win-Win

WorldAfterMidnight Getting Things Done The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows attention to be focused on taking action on tasks, instead of recalling them.[2] First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade. Themes[edit] Allen first demonstrates stress reduction from the method with the following exercise, centered on a task that has an unclear outcome or whose next action is not defined. He claims stress can be reduced and productivity increased by putting reminders about everything you are not working on into a trusted system external to your mind. Workflow[edit] Logic tree diagram illustrating the second and third steps (process/clarify and organize) of the five-step Getting Things Done workflow. Next, reflection (termed planning in the first edition) occurs. Implementation[edit]

What is Creativity? Revised Feb 17, 2014 Creativity is the act of turning new and imaginative ideas into reality. Creativity is characterised by the ability to perceive the world in new ways, to find hidden patterns, to make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena, and to generate solutions. Creativity involves two processes: thinking, then producing. “Creativity is the process of bringing something new into being. What is Innovation? Innovation is the implementation of a new or significantly improved product, service or process that creates value for business, government or society. Some people say creativity has nothing to do with innovation— that innovation is a discipline, implying that creativity is not. Creativity and Economic Development: We are living in the age of creativity. Daniel Pink in his book, A Whole New Mind (2005) defines Economic Development as: 1. Creativity is the Most Crucial Factor for Future Success IBM’s 2010 Global CEO Study stated: The Creativity Gap The short answer is yes.

Google Calendar Google Calendar is a free time-management web application offered by Google. It became available on April 13, 2006, and exited the beta stage in July 2009. Users are required to have a Google Account in order to use the software. Features[edit] Interface[edit] Content access[edit] Events are stored online; consequently, the calendar can be viewed from any location that has Internet access. Sharing calendars[edit] Google Calendar allows multiple calendars to be created and shown in the same view. Device synchronization[edit] Google integration[edit] Google Calendar is integrated with various other Google services: Gmail, Google's webmail service. 2009 introduction[edit] On March 4, 2009, Google Calendar began offering offline support.[7] On May 13, 2009, Google Calendar began offering to-do lists,[8][9] via Google Tasks. Compatibility[edit] Consistency and reliability[edit] As in other cloud computing applications, changes to Google Calendar are immediately visible to all users. See also[edit]

Kulturprojekte Berlin — Creative City Berlin Creative City Berlin is the point of contact and platform for artists and professionals within the creative sector. It provides information about sponsor programmes, setting up a business, awards, further education, scholarships and more. For participating artists and professionals, or those planning to move to the capital, Creative City Berlin provides a useful network of contacts. The project is organised by Berlin's Department for Cultural Affairs and the Senate Department for Economy (Projekt Zukunft (Project Future)). Weiterlesen: www.creative-city-berlin.de/en/ Calendaring software Calendaring software is software that minimally provides users with an electronic version of a calendar. Additionally, the software may provide an appointment book, address book, and/or contact list. These tools are an extension of many of the features provided by time management software such as desk accessory packages and computer office automation systems. Calendaring is a standard feature of many PDAs, EDAs, and smartphones. The software may be a local package designed for individual use (e.g. Features[edit] Calendaring software will contain one or more of the following features: Examples[edit] See also[edit] External links[edit]

Etherpad Etherpad (previously known as EtherPad)[1][2] is a web-based collaborative real-time editor, allowing authors to simultaneously edit a text document, and see all of the participants' edits in real-time, with the ability to display each author's text in their own color. There is also a chat box in the sidebar to allow meta communication. First launched in November 2008, the software was acquired by Google in December 2009 and released as open source later that month. Features and implementation[edit] Anyone can create a new collaborative document, known as a "pad". The software auto-saves the document at regular, short intervals, but participants can permanently save specific versions (checkpoints) at any time. Automated markup of JavaScript code was made available shortly after the launch. Launch[edit] Etherpad was launched on 19 November 2008 by David Greenspan, Aaron Iba, and J.D. Etherpad was covered by Slashdot on November 21, 2008,[7] resulting in server slowdown and downtime.

Collaborative real-time editor A collaborative editor is a form of collaborative software application that allows several people to edit a computer file using different computers, a practice called collaborative editing. There are two types of collaborative editing: real-time and non-real-time. In real-time collaborative editing (RTCE), users can edit the same file simultaneously, whereas in Non-real-time collaborative editing, the users do not edit the same file at the same time (similar to revision control systems). Collaborative real-time editors generally permit both the above modes of editing in any given instance. History[edit] The first instance of a collaborative real-time editor was demonstrated by Douglas Engelbart in 1968, in The Mother of All Demos. Instant Update was released for Mac OS in 1991 from ON Technology.[1] Later, a version for Microsoft Windows was released as well, allowing real-time collaboration across these two operating systems. Technical challenges[edit] Recent developments[edit]

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