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About Creative Commons

About Creative Commons
Want to let people share and use your photographs, but not allow companies to sell them?Looking for access to course materials from the world’s top universities?Want to encourage readers to re-publish your blog posts, as long as they give you credit?Looking for songs that you can use and remix, royalty-free? If you answered yes to any of the questions above, then you should learn more about Creative Commons. Probably the quickest and easiest introduction to CC is to watch the following short video: What is Creative Commons? Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. Our free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. What can Creative Commons do for me? Our mission Our vision Why CC? What we provide Where we’re going Volunteer

http://creativecommons.org/about

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Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online.

Choose a License This work is licensed under the Creative Commons LICENSE_NAME License. To view a copy of this license, visit LICENSE_URL. We are currently testing a new version of the License Chooser. International Activists Launch New Website to Gather and Share Copyright Knowledge San Francisco - The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Electronic Information for Libraries (eIFL.net), and other international copyright experts joined together today to launch Copyright Watch -- a public website created to centralize resources on national copyright laws at www.copyright-watch.org. "Copyright laws are changing across the world, and it's hard to keep track of these changes, even for those whose daily work is affected by them," said Teresa Hackett, Program Manager at eIFL.net. "A law that is passed in one nation can quickly be taken up by others, bilateral trade agreements, regional policy initiatives, or international treaties. With Copyright Watch, people can learn about the similarities and differences in national copyright laws, and they can use that information to more easily spot patterns and emerging trends."

Copyright Statement - The University of Alabama All users of World Wide Web servers at The University of Alabama are required to abide by and comply with all state and federal laws governing copyrights and trademarks as well as other applicable state and federal laws and applicable University polices. The use of copyrighted material may require the permission of the copyright owner. The absence of a copyright notice or symbol on a work does not mean it is not copyrighted. Copyrighted works can include, but are not limited to, text, graphics, music, and photographs.

Four Questions with Seth Priebatsch, Creator of LevelUp If you’ve grabbed a meal downtown or off a food truck and didn’t pay with cash or a card, there’s a good chance Seth Priebatsch had a hand in that purchase. Seth’s invention, LevelUp, has changed the way we pay for things. I asked him how it all works and the future of paying for stuff with our phones. 10 Digital Citizenship Resources: The Web in the Classroom…Part 3 Welcome to the third article in a series devoted to facilitating proper student internet interaction in the classroom. This classroom might be 1 to 1 or might be using technology to leverage student centered learning. In this post I would like to explore resources that are available for facilitating proper digital citizenship in the classroom. This post provides 10 resources and the next will deliver 10 more. Before reading, please take a moment to subscribe by email or RSS and also give me a follow on Twitter at mjgormans.

Creepy "Ratters" Spying on Women Through Their Webcams and Stealing Sexy Photos March 11, 2013 | Like this article? Join our email list: Unintended Consequences: Twelve Years under the DMCA March 2010 This document collects reported cases where the anti-circumvention provisions of the DMCA have been invoked not against pirates, but against consumers, scientists, and legitimate competitors. It will be updated from time to time as additional cases come to light. Copyright and Creative Commons Julia’s dream is to make a living as a photographer. In this dream, she takes amazing photos, people buy them, and their purchases fund her future work. But it’s not that simple. Julia wants to publish some of her photos to help spread the word, but she’s concerned because photos are easy to copy. She could lose control and not be able to make a living from her talent. So she does some research and learns that in the U.S., as with other countries, we have laws that give creators of materials like books, images, movies, artwork and music a way to own and protect their creations.

Creative Commons : Creating Better Digital Citizens Let’s take a brief look at Creative Commons licensing and why it’s important for students to understand it. Being a good digital citizen is important, but all too often when students find pictures or other works online, they fail to understand what they can re-use and what they can’t. You can learn more in the Teacher Learning Community as Jerry Swiatek also discusses how to determine if something is available under Creative Commons and then explores the process of how to license something with a Creative Commons license. As a teacher, your number one rule should be to model proper digital citizenship for your students. Creative Commons Resources: Images To Use In Your Classroom

‘I’m Google’ by Dina Kelberman: A Visual Exploration of Google Image Search I’m Google (direct link) is an ongoing digital art project by Baltimore artist Dina Kelberman that documents digital patterns through non-artistic photography found on Google Image Search. When I first started scrolling through her Tumblr I wasn’t quite sure what I was looking at: frame after frame of airplanes pouring orange fire retardant on fires which slowly morphed into an orange kayak and then an orange bridge and on and on until I realized every single image shared a slight visual characteristic with the image before it. Via her artist statement: I’m Google is an ongoing tumblr blog in which batches of images and videos that I cull from the internet are compiled into a long stream-of-consciousness.

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