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Cerebral Cortex. A locus on 2p12 containing the co-regulated MRPL19 and C2ORF3 genes is associated to dyslexia. + Author Affiliations *To whom correspondence should be addressed.

A locus on 2p12 containing the co-regulated MRPL19 and C2ORF3 genes is associated to dyslexia

Tel: +46 86089158; Fax: +46 87745538; Email: juha.kere@biosci.ki.se Received December 7, 2006. Accepted February 2, 2007. Abstract DYX3, a locus for dyslexia, resides on chromosome 2p11-p15. Developmental dyslexia is a specific disorder in learning to read and spell in spite of adequate educational resources, normal intelligence, no obvious sensory deficits and adequate sociocultural opportunity. Dyslexia is strongly familial, and abundant evidence supports genetic factors in its etiology (6). Three independent genome-wide scans using different analytical approaches have shown linkage of dyslexia to 2p12-p16 (14–16). In our previous genome-wide scan on 11 Finnish pedigrees, we identified linkage to the broad Chromosome 2 DYX3 locus using a categorical phenotype (16). Linkage disequilibrium mapping of the 2p12 dyslexia candidate region in Finnish families Figure 1.

An Investigation of Methods to Detect Feigned Reading Disabilities. Auditory processing and the development of language and literacy. Abstract This paper considers evidence for basic auditory processing impairments associated with dyslexia and specific language impairment, against a back-drop of findings from studies of the normal development of auditory and phonological processing.

Auditory processing and the development of language and literacy

A broad range of auditory impairments have been implicated in the aetiology of these language-learning disorders, including deficits in discriminating the temporal order of rapid sequences of auditory signals, elevated thresholds for frequency discrimination and for detection of amplitude and frequency modulation, impaired binaural processing and increased susceptibility to backward masking.

Current evidence is inconsistent, but suggests that not all children with language difficulties have non-verbal auditory processing impairments, and for those that do, the impact on language development is poorly understood. Some implications for clinical practice are discussed. Normal development of auditory processing in relation to speech perception. Convergence of Visual and Tactile Shape Processing in the Human Lateral Occipital Complex.

+ Author Affiliations Address correspondence to Amir Amedi, Neurobiology Department, Life Science Institute, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel.

Convergence of Visual and Tactile Shape Processing in the Human Lateral Occipital Complex

Email: amir@lobster.ls.huji.ac.il. Abstract We have recently demonstrated using fMRI that a region within the human lateral occipital complex (LOC) is activated by objects when either seen or touched. We term this cortical region LOtv for the lateral occipital tactile–visual region. Introduction A central theme in sensory neurophysiology is that information processing in primary sensory areas is strictly modality specific.

This finding raises an essential question. We show here that the object-related activation is robust in both the visual and tactile modalities. Materials and Methods MRI Acquisition The BOLD fMRI measurements were performed in a whole-body 1.5 T, Signa Horizon, LX8.25 General Electric scanner, located at the Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging in the Tel-Aviv Saurasky Medical Center. Experimental Procedure MRI Subjects. Functional genetic analysis of mutations implicated in a human speech and language disorder. Abstract Mutations in the FOXP2 gene cause a severe communication disorder involving speech deficits (developmental verbal dyspraxia), accompanied by wide-ranging impairments in expressive and receptive language.

Functional genetic analysis of mutations implicated in a human speech and language disorder

The protein encoded by FOXP2 belongs to a divergent subgroup of forkhead-box transcription factors, with a distinctive DNA-binding domain and motifs that mediate hetero- and homodimerization. Here we report the first direct functional genetic investigation of missense and nonsense mutations in FOXP2 using human cell-lines, including a well-established neuronal model system. Hearing Loss and Cognition Among Older Adults in the United States. Skip to Main Content Sign In Register Advanced Search Online ISSN 1758-535X Print ISSN 1079-5006 Copyright © 2017 The Gerontological Society of America Connect Resources Explore Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.

Hearing Loss and Cognition Among Older Adults in the United States

Philosophy of science and the diagnostic process. + Author Affiliations ↵*Correspondence to Brian H Willis, Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK; E-mail: b.h.willis@bham.ac.uk Abstract.

Philosophy of science and the diagnostic process

Reading Mechanisms in Orally Educated Deaf Adults. Jesús Alegria.

Reading Mechanisms in Orally Educated Deaf Adults

Retrocochlear function of the peripheral deafness gene Cacna1d. + Author Affiliations ↵*To whom correspondence should be addressed at: Department of Neurogenetics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany. Tel: +49 4417983932; Fax: +49 4417985649; Email: hans.g.nothwang@uni-oldenburg.de Received April 12, 2012. Accepted May 30, 2012. Abstract Hearing impairment represents the most common sensory deficit in humans. Hearing disorders are the most common sensory deficit in humans and represent a heavy social and economic burden to individuals and societies alike (1).

The Development of Audiovisual Multisensory Integration Across Childhood and Early Adolescence: A High-Density Electrical Mapping Study. + Author Affiliations Address correspondence to Dr Sophie Molholm, Departments of Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Van Etten Building—1C, 1225 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461.

The Development of Audiovisual Multisensory Integration Across Childhood and Early Adolescence: A High-Density Electrical Mapping Study

Email: sophie.molholm@einstein.yu.edu. Abstract The integration of multisensory information is essential to forming meaningful representations of the environment. Adults benefit from related multisensory stimuli but the extent to which the ability to optimally integrate multisensory inputs for functional purposes is present in children has not been extensively examined. Introduction The ability to construct meaningful internal representations of the environment depends on integrating and segregating the myriad multisensory inputs that enter the nervous system at a given moment.

To date, knowledge of the development of the neurophysiological processes that underlie MSI comes largely from animal studies. The genetic basis of the joint hypermobility syndromes. Rheumatologists have long considered that joint hypermobility is inherited.

The genetic basis of the joint hypermobility syndromes

The familial aggregation is striking and the pattern of inheritance strongly points to an autosomal dominant mode. The first comprehensive description of symptomatic joint hypermobility in the rheumatological literature is attributed to Kirk, Ansell and Bywaters in 1967 [1]. They coined the term ‘hypermobility syndrome’ (HMS). Too Little, Too Late: Reduced Visual Span and Speed Characterize Pure Alexia. Pure alexia is an acquired reading disorder that leaves writing unaffected.

Too Little, Too Late: Reduced Visual Span and Speed Characterize Pure Alexia

Pure alexic reading is usually slow with single-word reading characterized by a pronounced word length effect; reaction times (RTs) in reading increase linearly with word length, often with hundreds of milliseconds per letter (Behrmann, Plaut, and Nelson 1998). Theories of pure alexia can be roughly divided into 2 groups: 1) Domain-specific accounts, suggesting that pure alexia arises due to damage to a cognitive system or cerebral area specialized for recognizing visual word forms (Warrington and Shallice 1980; Warrington and Langdon 1994; Cohen et al. 2003; Cohen and Dehaene 2004); 2) General visual accounts, claiming that pure alexia reflects a general deficit in visual perception (Farah and Wallace 1991; Behrmann, Nelson, and Sekuler 1998), often conceptualized as a primary impairment in simultaneous perception or parallel processing (Farah, 2004). Methods Subjects Table 1 Background data for patients.