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The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein's Advice to His 11-Year-Old Son

The Secret to Learning Anything: Albert Einstein's Advice to His 11-Year-Old Son
by Maria Popova “That is the way to learn the most, that when you are doing something with such enjoyment that you don’t notice that the time passes.” With Father’s Day around the corner, here comes a fine addition to history’s greatest letters of fatherly advice from none other than Albert Einstein — brilliant physicist, proponent of peace, debater of science and spirituality, champion of kindness — who was no stranger to dispensing epistolary empowerment to young minds. In 1915, aged thirty-six, Einstein was living in wartorn Berlin, while his estranged wife, Mileva, and their two sons, Hans Albert Einstein and Eduard “Tete” Einstein, lived in comparatively safe Vienna. My dear Albert, Yesterday I received your dear letter and was very happy with it. I was already afraid you wouldn’t write to me at all any more. Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. You can also become a one-time patron with a single donation in any amount:

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How to Study Less by Learning Things Once You read over your notes. Then you read them over again. Then you read them over a third time. Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy - Harvard Health Books This updated edition of the national bestseller debunks dietary myths and presents Dr. Willett’s New Healthy Eating Pyramid, a healthier guide to nutrition than the recently revised USDA pyramid. Inside you’ll discover: eye-opening new research on the healthiest carbohydrates, fats, and proteinswhy weight control is still the single most important factormenu plans and brand-new recipes that make it even easier to reinvent your diet Millions of Americans concerned about healthy eating take their cues from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Guide Pyramid. Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class - SimpleK12 The following is a guest post from Michelle Doman, a 7th and 8th grade Language Arts teacher at Brandon Middle School in Wisconsin. Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class Many people get a little squeamish, wiggly, and offer a scrunched expression when I respond to the question, “What grades do you teach?” I teach middle school, and with heart and honesty, I find great joys (and challenges) in teaching the group referred to as “tweens” and adolescents. So, I invite you into the quirky world of middle school.

Einstein on Kindness, Our Shared Existence, and Life’s Highest Ideals by Maria Popova “Without the sense of fellowship with men of like mind… life would have seemed to me empty.” In times of turmoil, I often turn to one of my existential pillars of comfort: Albert Einstein’s Ideas and Opinions — the definitive collection of the great thinker’s essays on everything from science and religion to government to human nature, gathered under the supervision of Einstein himself. It’s been a challenging week, one that’s reminded me with merciless acuity the value of kindness and compassion, so I’ve once again turned to Einstein’s timeless “ideas and opinions” on this spectrum of subjects. On the ties of sympathy: How strange is the lot of us mortals!

How to Let Go of Anger and Embrace Forgiveness 19EmailShare This sixth article in the series comes from my friend Lynn from Back to the Garden. Lynn is a certified health and nutrition coach as well as a photographer that aims to see the good in everyone. Forgiveness = Compassion Book Review Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy EatingBy Walter C. Willett. 299 pp. New York, Simon & Schuster, 2001. $25. ISBN: 0-684-86337-5 There is an interesting dilemma for those who would influence nutrition. We Don't Like "Projects" So I recently quit my job and started my own school with the support of a local media company, the second largest school district in Iowa, and a groundswell of community interest. Our philosophy boils down to a fairly liberal project-based learning environment. As I began the marketing push to enroll students, I uncovered some frankly stunning assumptions that many students have about learning: The word "project" is not a happy word. When I say project-based learning, most students grimace as they imagine prescribed PowerPoints.If a teacher doesn't plan it, it's not learning.If there isn't a test, it wasn't real.Their personal interests cannot inform their learning. Learning is sterile, and the actual usage of the word "learning," to them, is quite different from what a professional might consider learning.

Why Time Slows Down When We’re Afraid, Speeds Up as We Age, and Gets Warped on Vacation by Maria Popova “Time perception matters because it is the experience of time that roots us in our mental reality.” Given my soft spot for famous diaries, it should come as no surprise that I keep one myself. Perhaps the greatest gift of the practice has been the daily habit of reading what I had written on that day a year earlier; not only is it a remarkable tool of introspection and self-awareness, but it also illustrates that our memory “is never a precise duplicate of the original [but] a continuing act of creation” and how flawed our perception of time is — almost everything that occurred a year ago appears as having taken place either significantly further in the past (“a different lifetime,” I’d often marvel at this time-illusion) or significantly more recently (“this feels like just last month!”). Discus chronologicus, a depiction of time by German engraver Christoph Weigel, published in the early 1720s; from Cartographies of Time. (Click for details)

Why I've Decided To Stop Comparing Myself To Others Many people I know slave to the comparison game. I’m not as thin as so and so; I’m not as tall or as pretty. I’m not as wealthy as she or he is. I’m not as strong or as flexible. I’m not as funny or as intelligent. Absurdism Absurdism is a philosophical stance embracing a wide range of relativist perspectives, which implies that the efforts of humanity to find or absolutely define, limit, express or exclude the inherent meanings of anything, including human existence, are absurd because the qualities of communicable information available to the human mind, and relationships within Reality makes any certainty about such impossible. Absurdist assessments stand in contrast to many assumptions of absolutism. Philosophical schools of absurdism explore the fundamental nature of the Absurd and how individuals, once they become aware of it, can or should react to it and to circumstances they encounter. See also: Principia Discordia

22 Mind-Blowing Infographics on Education Data is extremely valuable for all of us in the education industry; we”ve got to consume a lot of it to make valuable decisions for our students and schools. However, when you spend too much time with your nose in your computer, e-reader or a book, it”s easy to forget what information looks like. That”s why I took the time to put together a list of amazing, tantalizingly visual infographics meant to titillate your mind and engage your visual synapses. There are 22 mind-blowing infographics on education below. Enjoy this hand-picked visual feast! David Ogilvy’s Timeless Principles of Creative Management by Maria Popova “If you ever find a man who is better than you are — hire him. If necessary, pay him more than you pay yourself.”

Change A Habit In Three Steps With This Flowchart I'm going to promote your comment by way of calling you out for being a bullshitter extraordinaire. Nicotine is one of the most famously addictive substances known. There are many cases reported of people who were told they had cancer, were on drugs and treatment to help them fight cancer, and yet could not stop smoking tobacco. The BBC had a documentary about this phenomenon at least 15 years ago. If you claim that you simply stopped your addiction to tobacco and 'it was easy', I can only suspect you to be either a liar or someone with above-human psychological abilities. Jean-Paul Sartre I cannot make liberty my aim unless I make that of others equally my aim. Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre, was a French existentialist philosopher, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist, and critic. He had an enduring personal relationship with fellow philosopher Simone de Beauvoir.

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