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Vygotsky, ZPD, Scaffolding, Connectivism and Personal Learning Networks

Vygotsky, ZPD, Scaffolding, Connectivism and Personal Learning Networks
There is a fascinating distributed dialogue about the nature of instructional scaffolding, the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and how they can be viewed in the domain of today's learning landscapes. Graham Attwell identifies the issue of the role of Teacher in the work on ZPD. He points out that a lot of learning occurs without one person acting in a Teacher role. Indeed the role of a Teacher, as such, is only really necessary in the type of education system which we have, designed to cater for the industrial age's needs. In Vygotsky's terms, the Teacher is seen as having a role in the exploitation (or definition) of the ZPD, which is the zone of learning capacity beyond that of the learner in isolation when supported by an adult or by collaboration with 'more capable peers'. The Teacher role is part of the scaffolding described by Bruner, a resource to help the learner expand their capacity to acquire new (to them) knowledge and skills. Vygotsky Info doc : ressources

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Zone of proximal development In the middle circle, representing the zone of proximal development, students cannot complete tasks unaided, but can complete them with guidance. The zone of proximal development, often abbreviated as ZPD, is the difference between what a learner can do without help and what he or she can do with help.[1] It is a concept introduced, yet not fully developed, by Soviet psychologist Lev Vygotsky (1896–1934) during the last ten years of his life.[2] Vygotsky stated that a child follows an adult's example and gradually develops the ability to do certain tasks without help.[3] Vygotsky and some educators believe that education's role is to give children experiences that are within their zones of proximal development, thereby encouraging and advancing their individual learning.[4]

An Introduction to Connective Knowledge Revised and Updated (minor corrections and typos only) and placed in MS-Word Document form, November 27, 2007. Click here. The version that follows below is the original (uncorrected) version). Yet another article, describing new forms of knowledge as probablistic, has crossed my desk today, and consequently it seems appropriate at this time to type a few words on the nature of distributed knowledge. It should go without saying that these are my own thoughts, and this discussion should not therefore be considered an authoritative reference on the subject. Moreover, this is intended to be a brief overview, and not an academic treatise on the subject.

Top 100 Education Blogs Education blogs are becoming a means for educators, students, and education administrators to interact more effectively than ever before. They are also a great resource for those searching for the best online education programs to jumpstart their teaching careers. Technorati currently tracks 63.1 million blogs. Lev Vygotsky Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (Russian: Лев Семёнович Вы́готский or Выго́тский, born Лев Симхович Выгодский (Lev Simkhovich Vygodsky), November 17 [O.S. November 5] 1896 – June 11, 1934) was a Soviet psychologist, the founder of cultural-historical psychology, and the leader of the Vygotsky Circle. In the early 1920s, his birth name was changed from Vygodskii (with "d") into Vygotskii (with middle "t"). Lev Vygotsky was born in Orsha, Byelorussia, in the Russian Empire (present-day Belarus) into a nonreligious Jewish family.

Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge Stephen Downes October 16, 2006 I have a lot of mixed feelings about this paper but it is an honest and reasonably thorough outline of my views. I hope people find it interesting and rewarding. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the thinking behind new e-learning technology, including e-portfolios and personal learning environments. CAS Authentication wanted! Social media from Twitter to Facebook, LinkedIn to YouTube creates opportunities for building relationships, cultivating customers and promoting business, but the sea of updates and input awash with data both important and consequential can drown all but the most dogged of users. Fortunately, app developers have created more than a few devices to make keeping afloat in the social media waters manageable, sane and even productive. Yet even the tools intended to help users navigate social media ar 1 of 20 With TweetDeck, users can customize their Twitter experience with groups, columns, saved searches and automatic updates to help them stay updated about interesting people and topics.

Social Development Theory (Vygotsky Summary: Social Development Theory argues that social interaction precedes development; consciousness and cognition are the end product of socialization and social behavior. Originator: Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934). Key terms: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory is the work of Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934), who lived during Russian Revolution. Vygotsky’s work was largely unkown to the West until it was published in 1962.

The frontier of education: Web 3D a simulpost with TechLearningAs I read about the evolution of the Web, I just feel that many of the experts are missing it! (Perhaps the 3D web is part of the "intelligent agent" idea, but I'm not so sure.) Yes, I think the semantic web is important (see the W3c specs) and inherently part of the future of the web, but I think there is one overarching evolution happening right now under our feet that is inexorably enmeshed with the semantic web. It is there amidst the video games and "fun things" that most educators refuse to recognize. With "Web 2.0" barely taking a "bit" part in most of today's classrooms, the next evolution of the web, I predict, is not Web 3.0. I think it will be Web 3D.

The 19 Best Elearning Blogs - Articulate – Word of Mouth Blog Sep52006 From learning theories to content design, metadata to LMSes, survey data to industry trends, these blogs have it all. This list represents some of the more active e-learning blogs I’ve found or already read regularly. Each of these is great in its own way — be it the in-depth analysis, the industry headlines, the technical prowess — but all will get you thinking about learning and technology in new ways. The 19 Best Elearning Blogs* (in no particular order) The Rapid eLearning Blog Tom Kuhlmann was a customer of ours who made a name for himself in the Articulate Community Forums with his creative tips and tricks about Articulate products, and his unique ability to understand how to build original elearning courses that engage the learner and simultaneously meet business objectives.

Classroom Applications of Vygotsky's Theory Ch. 2, p. 47 Classroom Applications of Vygotsky’s Theory Vygotsky’s concept of the zone of proximal development is based on the idea that development is defined both by what a child can do independently and by what the child can do when assisted by an adult or more competent peer (Daniels, 1995; Wertsch, 1991). Knowing both levels of Vygotsky’s zone is useful for teachers, for these levels indicate where the child is at a given moment as well as where the child is going. Connectivism Blog: Connectivism Archives I enjoy instructing instructors. Any long term change in our formal learning institutions will be bottom up - as educators change and experiment with new ways to maximize the learner's experience and value. Recently, I instructed a course on "testing, evaluation, and assessment".

learning, networks, knowledge, technology, community The Learning Analytics and Knowledge conference (LAK16) is happening this week in Edinburgh. I unfortunately, due to existing travel and other commitments, am not in attendance. I have great hope for the learning analytics field as one that will provide significant research for learning and help us move past naive quantitative and qualitative assessments of research and knowledge. I see LA as a bricolage of skills, techniques, and academic/practitioner domains. It is a multi-faceted approach of learning exploration and one where anyone with a stake in the future of learning can find an amenable conversation and place to research. Since I am missing LAK16, and feeling nostalgic, I want to share my reflections of how LAK and the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) became the influential agencies that they now are in learning research.

key to learning Viva Vygotsky! Freedom of Thought Galina Doyla & Sue Palmer He lived for only 38 years, but in his last decade (1924-1934), the Russian thinker Lev Vygotsky transformed the study of developmental psychology. His cultural-historical theory caused an explosion of interest in Russia, and inspired much original research by other psychologists. Tragically, these innovative and inspirational ideas were immediately suppressed. What Is Web 2.0 by Tim O'Reilly 09/30/2005 Oct. 2009: Tim O'Reilly and John Battelle answer the question of "What's next for Web 2.0?" in Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On. The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web. Many people concluded that the web was overhyped, when in fact bubbles and consequent shakeouts appear to be a common feature of all technological revolutions.

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