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Great Ideas in Personality

Great Ideas in Personality
Please note that these pages are no longer regularly maintained and, as a result, some of the information here is out of date. You might also be interested in visiting two of our related sites: the Personality Project provides additional and updated content on personality theory and the SAPA Project provides a free personality assessment that is based on modern personality models. SAPA Project Test How do people tend to think, feel, and behave--and what causes these tendencies? These are the questions addressed by personality theory and research. This website deals with scientific research programs in personality psychology.

http://www.personalityresearch.org/

Related:  Personality DefinedPersonality typesPersonality typesPersonality Psychology

Association for Research in Personality The Association for Research in Personality is a scientific organization devoted to bringing together scholars whose research contributes to the understanding of personality structure, development, and dynamics. New research and theories with broad implications for understanding personality have emerged in recent years. For example, new findings about the origins of personality traits are emerging from population and molecular genetics research, as well as from studies of the neurophysiology of individual differences.

The Sequence of Archetypes in Individuation DynaPsych Table of Contents James Whitlark Professor of English 16 Personality Factors The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (or 16PF),[1] is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire which was developed over several decades of research by Raymond B. Cattell, Maurice Tatsuoka and Herbert Eber. Beginning in the 1940s, Cattell used the new techniques of factor analysis (based on the correlation coefficient) in an attempt to try to discover and measure the source traits of human personality (Cattell, 1946)(Nevid, 2009).[2][3] The questionnaire measures the 16 primary traits, and the Big Five secondary traits,[4][5] which have become popularized by other authors in recent years. From early in his research, Cattell found that the structure of personality was multi-level and hierarchical, with a structure of interdependent primary and secondary level traits (Cattell, 1946, 1957).[2][6] The sixteen primary factors were a result of factor-analyzing hundreds of measures of everyday behaviors to find the fundamental traits behind them. Outline of Test[edit]

Personality psychology Personality psychology is a branch of psychology that studies personality and its variation between individuals. Its areas of focus include: Construction of a coherent picture of the individual and his or her major psychological processesInvestigation of individual psychological differencesInvestigation of human nature and psychological similarities between individuals Personality Personality refers to individual differences in characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving. The study of personality focuses on two broad areas: One is understanding individual differences in particular personality characteristics, such as sociability or irritability. The other is understanding how the various parts of a person come together as a whole. Adapted from the Encyclopedia of Psychology Understanding Personality Disorders

Category:Personality typologies The concept of personality type refers to the psychological classification of different types of people. Personality types can be distinguished from personality traits, which come in different levels or degrees. According to type theories, for example, there are two fundamental types of people, introverts and extraverts. According to trait theories, introversion and extraversion are part of a continuous dimension, with many people in the middle. The idea of psychological types originated in the theoretical work of Carl Jung and other researchers. Subcategories

Personality type This article is about the generic aspects of type theory. For the book by Jung, see Psychological Types. Clinically effective personality typologies[edit] Effective personality typologies reveal and increase knowledge and understanding of individuals, as opposed to diminishing knowledge and understanding as occurs in the case of stereotyping. Effective typologies also allow for increased ability to predict clinically relevant information about people and to develop effective treatment strategies.[2] There is an extensive literature on the topic of classifying the various types of human temperament and an equally extensive literature on personality traits or domains.

Can People’s Personalities Change? Has one of the oldest questions about personality been answered? For many years personality psychologists gave the same answer as any pessimist: no, people’s personalities don’t change. This was even more true once they got to 30-years-old. By that time, it was thought that if people preferred their own company or were overly neurotic, they tended to stay that way. In the last 15 years, though, this view has changed. Instead of personality being set in stone at 30, now evidence is emerging that there is some change. Psychodynamic theories of personality - Freud, Erikson and Adler The psychodynamic theories of personality are mainly composed of famous theorists such as Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson and Alfred Adler. The Object Relations Theory also belongs to this group of personality theories. Let's see how each theory explains the nature and process of personality. Sigmund Freud: Structural Model of Personality Through his study of the psychosexual development of humans, Sigmund Freud was able to develop the Structural Model, which explains the three parts of a person's personality (id, ego, and superego).

Table of similar systems of comparison of temperaments Beginnings[edit] The Roman physician Galen mapped the four temperaments (sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholic) to a matrix of hot/cold and dry/wet, taken from the four classical elements.[1] Two of these temperaments, sanguine and choleric, shared a common trait: quickness of response (corresponding to "heat"), while the melancholic and phlegmatic shared the opposite, a longer response (coldness). The melancholic and choleric, however, shared a sustained response (dryness), and the sanguine and phlegmatic shared a short-lived response (wetness). This meant that the choleric and melancholic both would tend to hang on to emotions like anger, and thus appear more serious and critical than the fun-loving sanguine, and the peaceful phlegmatic. However, the choleric would be characterized by quick expressions of anger (like the sanguine, with the difference being that the sanguine cools off); while the melancholic would build up anger slowly, silently, before exploding. David W.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator A chart with descriptions of each Myers–Briggs personality type and the four dichotomies central to the theory The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is an introspective self-report questionnaire designed to indicate psychological preferences in how people perceive the world around them and make decisions.[1][2][3] The MBTI was constructed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers. History[edit] Katharine Cook Briggs began her research into personality in 1917. 4 Personality Traits That Make You an Effective Leader What makes a good leader? Which personality traits do the best trailblazers share? Every organization has its own benchmarks for determining who would make the best head of its teams, but are those qualities really all that different? Research in the field suggests that, on a broad level, employees and employers are looking for similar characteristics in their leaders -- no matter what business they're in. Here are four personality traits that people want in a boss. Related: 5 Influential CEOs Weigh in What Makes a Good Leader

Solomon Asch: Forming Impressions of Personality (Free Full Text) Solomon Asch Thinking About Becoming A Psychology Student? Find A Psychology School Near You A Psychology Classic

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