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The Myers & Briggs Foundation

The Myers & Briggs Foundation

http://www.myersbriggs.org/

Related:  MBTIPersonality typesPersonality typesPsychology treeIntroversion

MBTI for Skeptics By Ryan Smith, Eva Gregersen, and Sigurd Arild A number of common critiques of Jungian typology and the MBTI are often voiced in no uncertain terms by people who have comparatively little knowledge about these fields. In this article we purport to answer the most common of these critiques. MBTI is pseudoscience and no better than astrology.There are personality tests that are more scientific than the MBTI.In terms of empirical evidence, types don’t exist. Human traits are distributed on a bell curve (normally), not as two camel humps (bimodally).People who take the MBTI multiple times often come out as different types (Low Test-Retest Reliability).MBTI descriptions contain vague and flattering statements that anyone would agree to (Forer Effect).Psychologists and academic researchers don’t take the MBTI seriously.Jung’s cognitive functions were good. MBTI is pseudoscience and no better than astrology.False.

Table of similar systems of comparison of temperaments Beginnings[edit] The Roman physician Galen mapped the four temperaments (sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholic) to a matrix of hot/cold and dry/wet, taken from the four classical elements.[1] Two of these temperaments, sanguine and choleric, shared a common trait: quickness of response (corresponding to "heat"), while the melancholic and phlegmatic shared the opposite, a longer response (coldness). The melancholic and choleric, however, shared a sustained response (dryness), and the sanguine and phlegmatic shared a short-lived response (wetness).

Table of similar systems of comparison of temperaments Beginnings[edit] The Roman physician Galen mapped the four temperaments (sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholic) to a matrix of hot/cold and dry/wet, taken from the four classical elements.[1] Two of these temperaments, sanguine and choleric, shared a common trait: quickness of response (corresponding to "heat"), while the melancholic and phlegmatic shared the opposite, a longer response (coldness). The melancholic and choleric, however, shared a sustained response (dryness), and the sanguine and phlegmatic shared a short-lived response (wetness). This meant that the choleric and melancholic both would tend to hang on to emotions like anger, and thus appear more serious and critical than the fun-loving sanguine, and the peaceful phlegmatic. However, the choleric would be characterized by quick expressions of anger (like the sanguine, with the difference being that the sanguine cools off); while the melancholic would build up anger slowly, silently, before exploding. David W.

How to Detect Lies - body language, reactions, speech patterns Interesting Info -> Lying Index -> How to Detect Lies Become a Human Lie Detector (Part 1) Warning: sometimes ignorance is bliss. After gaining this knowledge, you may be hurt when it is obvious that someone is lying to you. Embracing Your Inner Introvert Have you ever felt like you just weren’t the right kind of person? You love making new friends, but hate the atmosphere of an overcrowded bar. You do a job more efficiently by yourself, but feel guilty that you don’t enjoy teamwork. You adore performing and being in the spotlight, but become awkward and taciturn during rowdy cast parties. More than once you’ve been advised to read one of Dale Carnegie’s books. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or MBTI, was developed during World War II, by a young woman named Isabel Briggs Myers, and her mother, Katharine Briggs. Isabel decided to do her part for the war effort by creating a self-report inventory that would make Carl Jung's theory of psychological types available to more people. Her goals were two-fold; 1) Help people find a better fit for their work and make that work more effective and 2) Promote world peace by helping people develop more appreciation for individual differences and how to use the differences constructively rather than divisively. Today the MBTI is a well-known tool used for business effectiveness, communication, career development, cross-cultural understanding, education, and spirituality. It is made up of four preferences; how you get energy, how you take in information, how you make decisions and how you relate to the outside world.

16 Personality Factors The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (or 16PF),[1] is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire which was developed over several decades of research by Raymond B. Cattell, Maurice Tatsuoka and Herbert Eber. Beginning in the 1940s, Cattell used the new techniques of factor analysis (based on the correlation coefficient) in an attempt to try to discover and measure the source traits of human personality (Cattell, 1946)(Nevid, 2009).[2][3]

The Heroes of Myth and Folklore: Part One – Defining a Hero Herakles battling the Hydra There is a special genre of tales in the texts of Hellenic mythology that recounts the deeds of extraordinary men and women such as Herakles, Perseus, Jason and Medeia to name but a few. These larger-than-life people are called the Heroes. Their stories derive from the most ancient form of the oral tradition and have evolved through the ages into the symbolic and historical mythology of mortals who were granted immortality through their destinies and the homage and remembrance of their descendants. To study the heroes is both an historical and symbolic journey that explores how the world of the immortal Gods interacts with the world of mortal men and women. The heroic tales speak not only of the history of mankind upon the earth but also explores the very nature of humanity itself.

Factors for Relationship Compatibility Using the Enneagram "[John] Money, a distinguished sex therapist and sex researcher, described the lovemap as a mosaic of traits that make up, partly in our conscious mind but mostly in our unconscious, the picture of our ideal mate or lover and what we would do with them. This conglomerate of traits may include many aspects of the personality, how a person behaves socially, certain critical values, race, religion and political persuasion; it often includes physical characteristics such as hair color, height, weight, body shape or a certain look. But it is also involved with deeply unconscious assumptions and preferences. For example, one aspect of my own lovemap (that I was unaware of for many years) is my preference for a man who can fix things around the house, the way my dad did. He built our family's home from the ground up, even installing his own water pipes and electric wiring. So I'm attracted to men who can "fix things," and I have little interest in a guy who has no ability as a handyman.

Mike the Mentor - Coaching - MBTI and Coaching The Myers Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) is widely used to give insight into how people structure their reality and make sense of the world. Some coaches also use it to determine the style of coaching most likely to be effective with particular individuals (see, for example, I'm Not Crazy, I'm Just Not You: Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types for more on MBTI). Personality type This article is about the generic aspects of type theory. For the book by Jung, see Psychological Types. Clinically effective personality typologies[edit] Effective personality typologies reveal and increase knowledge and understanding of individuals, as opposed to diminishing knowledge and understanding as occurs in the case of stereotyping. Effective typologies also allow for increased ability to predict clinically relevant information about people and to develop effective treatment strategies.[2] There is an extensive literature on the topic of classifying the various types of human temperament and an equally extensive literature on personality traits or domains. These classification systems attempt to describe normal temperament and personality and emphasize the predominant features of different temperament and personality types; they are largely the province of the discipline of psychology.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator A chart with descriptions of each Myers–Briggs personality type and the four dichotomies central to the theory The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is an introspective self-report questionnaire designed to indicate psychological preferences in how people perceive the world around them and make decisions.[1][2][3] The MBTI was constructed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers. History[edit] Katharine Cook Briggs began her research into personality in 1917. Upon meeting her future son-in-law, she observed marked differences between his personality and that of other family members.

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