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40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire
by Timothy B. Lee on August 19, 2014 Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. He was Rome's first emperor, having won a civil war more than 40 years earlier that transformed the dysfunctional Roman Republic into an empire. Under Augustus and his successors, the empire experienced 200 years of relative peace and prosperity. Here are 40 maps that explain the Roman Empire — its rise and fall, its culture and economy, and how it laid the foundations of the modern world. The rise and fall of Rome The rise and fall of RomeIn 500 BC, Rome was a minor city-state on the Italian peninsula. The rise of Rome Rome's military Rome's powerful maniple formation Rome's powerful maniple formationIn the early years of the republic, the Roman infantry used a version of the Greek phalanx. The republic becomes an empire The lost city of Pompeii The eruption of Mount Vesuvius The eruption of Mt. The culture of Rome Roman Britain and the Roman economy The decline of Rome Rome's legacy

http://www.vox.com/2014/8/19/5942585/40-maps-that-explain-the-roman-empire

Related:  R o o m a n valtakuntaHistory/GeographycartothèquesHistorical Kingdoms/NamesEmpire romain

Top 10 Myths About the Romans History For many, the only exposure to Ancient Rome comes from what they have seen in the movies or on television. Unfortunately, films like Gladiator, Spartacus, Barabbas, and Demetrius and the Gladiators don’t present a very accurate depiction of life in Rome and the arena. Considering the fact that the Roman Empire existed for so long, and so much of our own Western society has derived from it, it is no surprise that we all have at least one or two misconceptions about the Empire and its people.

J. Rainforest role in the water cycle « Rainforest Conservation Fund Freshwater is an essential resource which is under increasing pressure. Dams and other diversionary activities, particularly agriculture, have diverted a huge amount of the world’s fresh water for human use. Humans now use more than 50% of the available fresh water of the earth, and this proportion is en route to increase to 70% in the next half-century. Therefore it behooves us to attend to all factors which affect the water cycle. Introduction to Digital Cartography Navigationspfad Home Introduction to Digital Cartography “A message to mapmakers: highways are not painted red, rivers don’t have county lines running down the middle, and you can’t see contour lines on a mountain.”– from Data and Reality by William Kent (1978) What Do Cartographers Do ? There are many types of cartographers: Experts, laymen, map editors, users…

KateMonk This is a collection of names from around the world which was initially intended to help provide character names for live role-players. It includes short historical backgrounds, male and female first names or personal names, and surnames or family names, from many countries and periods. The author is not an expert in onomastics or history so would like to apologise if any mistakes have been made. All names included are from genuine sources to the best of her knowledge, but this is not an academic study and should not be relied upon by re-enactment societies which require specific dates and instances of occurrence for the names they use. Catégorie: Cartes de l'Empire romain Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem). Please copy the text in the edit box below and insert it manually by editing this page. Upon submitting the note will be published multi-licensed under the terms of the CC-BY-SA-3.0 license and of the GFDL, versions 1.2, 1.3, or any later version. See our terms of use for more details.

Ancient Rome for Kids: The Colosseum History >> Ancient Rome The Colosseum is a giant amphitheatre in the center of Rome, Italy. It was built during the Roman Empire. When was it built? Construction on the Colosseum was started in 72 AD by the emperor Vespasian. Global risks: Pool knowledge to stem losses from disasters Turjoy Chowdhury/Nurphoto/Corbis This year's deadly earthquakes in Nepal killed more than 8,000 people and reduced thousands of buildings to rubble. In April and May, two massive earthquakes in Nepal killed more than 8,400 people, injured 20,000 and reduced 300,000 houses to rubble. In March, Cyclone Pam destroyed homes, schools, infrastructure and livelihoods on the Pacific island of Vanuatu, affecting half the population, including 82,000 children. Both nations will take years to recover.

Map Projections: Polyhedral Maps - part 2 <br /><table class="warning" summary=""><tr><td><h2 class="warning">JavaScript Is Not Available</h2><table summary=""><tr><td><img src="../../StockImg/warning36.png" alt=""></td><td>&nbsp;</td><td><em>Since JavaScript is disabled or not supported in your browser, some or all maps in this page will not be displayed.</em></td></tr></table></td></tr></table><br /> Cubic Globes

Forgotten Nations History Rome annihilated Carthage to ensure it would never again rise as a major threat. The Ottomans forever ended Byzantium’s glory. The vast armies of Persia were repeatedly beaten back by the Greeks, subjugated by the might of Alexander, and destroyed by the rise of Islam. Ancient World Mapping Center The center supports a variety of ongoing projects including: Current Projects: Antiquity À-la-carte The Antiquity À-la-carte application is an interactive digital map of the ancient world built using open source software and data derived from The Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World and Pleiades. The project seeks to make an interactive, manipulable map of the ancient Mediterranean world intended primarily for students and their instructors.

Pantheon, Rooma, virtuaalisesti Panorama from the inside of the Pantheon. This is a hand held panorama taken early in the day in the Pantheon, one of the top tourist attractions in Rome which rapidly fills with people by the hundreds. The best time to see the Pantheon is early in the morning when you can absorb and contemplate this fantastic building in relative silence. All the World's Volcano Webcams Never in the history of volcanology have so many volcanoes been monitored. We have the ability to sit and watch hundreds of volcanoes as they sleep, rumble or erupt — all from the comfort of our homes or offices. This instant connectivity to volcanoes in some of the most remote parts of the world is what gives us the impression that there are more volcanic eruptions today than in the past. There really aren’t more, but rather we hear about or see the eruptions much faster. With the network of webcams and the peering eyes of satellites, almost no volcano can erupt on the planet and we not notice. So, fear not, volcanism isn’t on the rise but our ability to see the action live is.

The National Map The National Map is now offering a collection of small-scale datasets that can be downloaded for free. Although the 1997-2014 Edition of the National Atlas of the United States was retired in September 2014, The National Map recognizes the importance of continuing to make a collection of the small-scale datasets, originally developed for the National Atlas, available to users. Small-scale maps have an advantage over large-scale maps when there is a need to show a large area in a single view. This makes small-scale maps an ideal solution for scientists, decision-makers, and planners needing to provide a geographical context for the research projects. Generally, certain geographical and feature details found in large-scale maps are limited or omitted in small-scale maps. The choice of small-scale maps always comes down to the intended use of the final map.

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