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American Memory from the Library of Congress - Home Page

American Memory from the Library of Congress - Home Page

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html

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"An Act to Establish and Regulate the Domestic Relations of Persons of Color..." or the Black Codes of South Carolina, December 1865 "An Act to Establish and Regulate the Domestic Relations of Persons of Color..." or the Black Codes of South Carolina, December 1865 Printable PDF Version (Manuscript) Printable PDF Version (Printed Statutes) Additional Flash Versions Document Description: Religion and the Founding of the American Republic This exhibition demonstrates that many of the colonies that in 1776 became the United States of America were settled by men and women of deep religious convictions who in the seventeenth century crossed the Atlantic Ocean to practice their faith freely. That the religious intensity of the original settlers would diminish to some extent over time was perhaps to be expected, but new waves of eighteenth century immigrants brought their own religious fervor across the Atlantic and the nation's first major religious revival in the middle of the eighteenth century injected new vigor into American religion. The result was that a religious people rose in rebellion against Great Britain in 1776, and that most American statesmen, when they began to form new governments at the state and national levels, shared the convictions of most of their constituents that religion was, to quote Alexis de Tocqueville's observation, indispensable to the maintenance of republican institutions.

Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Go to the blog Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS.

Archived: Teachers' tools, NCID, CDC Virus Encounters This popular free curriculum offers middle and high school school teachers a comprehensive set of multimedia aids and activities for teaching units on infectious disease topics. CDC experts team up with Turner CNNfyi.com and use extensive video, text, and the transcripts of interactive discussions to present sessions on topics like viruses, infectious diseases yesterday and today, influenza, and epidemiology, the disease detective profession. Accompanying these are five complete learning activities, including labs and simulations, that allow students to further explore the subjects. To round out the program, teachers and students are provided with text resources and a related site listing, worksheets, and glossary. All materials here are adapted from a live, daylong interactive event with webcasts and moderated chats that was broadcast on October 24, 2000.

Civil War Primary Sources Primary Documents by Topic: Most Popular Official Records Addresses & Speeches Acts, Bills, & Orders Military Correspondence & Documents Personal Correspondence & Narratives Prints & Photos Maps Document Collections Getting Started Primary Documents Official Confederate Correspondence Robert E. Lee, Resignation from the United States Army ยป New Georgia Encyclopedia: Black Legislators during Reconstruction Turner came to Georgia from Washington, D.C., in 1865 to win black congregations to the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME). He was the most successful black politician in organizing the black Republican vote and attracted other ministers into politics. He was a delegate to the Georgia constitutional convention of 1867 and was elected to two terms in the Georgia legislature, beginning in 1868. Campbell, a native of New Jersey, was a minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. In 1864 he was appointed an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau on the Georgia Sea Islands.

The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship The exhibition The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, showcases the incomparable African American collections of the Library of Congress. Displaying more than 240 items, including books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays, films, and recordings, this is the largest black history exhibit ever held at the Library, and the first exhibition of any kind to feature presentations in all three of the Library's buildings. The major presentation in the Jefferson Building, The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, explored black America's quest for equality from the early national period through the twentieth century. The items in this exhibit attest to the drama and achievement of this remarkable story.

Resources High School Lessons (article PDF) From Social EducationThe Technology of Unequal Rights for Women: Patent Drawings of a Voting Machine Middle Level Lessons (whole-issue PDF) From Middle Level LearningRevolutionary Women: Portraits of Life in the 13 Colonies Elementary Lessons (article PDF) From Social Studies and the Young LearnerJane Addams: Raising Up the Poor U.S. Department of Agriculture Agencies and Offices A list of all Agencies and Offices within USDA Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services National Art Inventories What are the Inventories? The Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture document more than 400,000 artworks in public and private collections worldwide. The Inventory of American Paintings includes works by artists who were active in America by 1914. The Inventory of American Sculpture has no cut-off date and includes works from the colonial era through contemporary times. These online databases are supplemented by a photographic collection of over 80,000 images.

Primary Sources: Workshops in American History Workshop 1. The Virginia Company: America's Corporate Beginnings with Pauline Maier, Massachusetts Institute of Technology How can primary sources illuminate historical events? This workshop tells the story of Jamestown, a less-than-successful example of America's capitalist beginnings and a colony as a business operation. The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom President Lyndon Johnson speaking to the nation from the White House prior to signing the Civil Rights Bill into law, while (left to right) Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, Senator Hubert Humphrey, AFL/CIO President George Meany, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Representative Emanuel Celler listen, July 2, 1964.

Archival resources from the Library of Congress for exploring many aspects of American history and culture. by nda_librarian Apr 30

American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning. by feillet Oct 12

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