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Rubrics for Assessment

Rubrics for Assessment
Teachers who integrate technology into student activities and projects often ask us this question - “How do I grade it?” Fundamentally, assessing multimedia activities and projects is no different than evaluating traditional assignments, such as written essays. The primary distinctions between them are the unique features and divergent possibilities associated with their respective medium. For instance, a blog has a unique set of possibilities (such as hypertext, embedded video, interactive imagery, etc) vastly different than those of a notebook (paper and pen notes and drawings within a contained document). The first thing to realize is that you cannot separate the user from the device. iPads, Chromebooks, and tech tools themselves don’t demonstrate great learning; it’s about what students do with the technology that matters. The technology itself is simply neutral.

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The Twitteraholic’s Ultimate Guide to tweets, hashtags, and all things Twitter Most educators who learn to use Twitter effectively say they learn more from their personal learning network (PLN) on Twitter than they’ve achieved from any other forms of professional development or personal learning. Unfortunately educators often dismiss Twitter, or fail to see the value of Twitter, when they’re first introduced to Twitter. Our aim of this post is to provide all the information you need to learn how to use Twitter effectively as an educator. We regularly update this post with new information. This post was last updated June, 2014. Click on a link below to go to the section you want to read:

Rubrics for Teachers - Assessment A collection of rubrics for assessing portfolios, group work/cooperative learning, concept map, research process/ report, PowerPoint, oral presentation, web page, blog, wiki, and other social media projects. Quick Links to Rubrics Social Media Project Rubrics Wiki RubricCriteria for assessing individual and group Wiki contributions. Blog RubricAssess individual blog entries, including comments on peers' blogs. Twitter RubricAssess learning during social networking instructional assignments.

Digital Stories @ UMBC UMBC Links: A-Z Index | myUMBC | Events | Directory | Maps Grading Rubrics Rubrics are effective tools for educators. For students, they give clear, detailed expectations in relation to class projects. For instructors they aid in the assessment of project assignments, providingfor more objective grading. The following rubrics can be used in their current form or modified foruse in your course/project.

Technology Summer Camp Remember summer camp? The adventures, the friendships, the challenges, the mosquito bites? Well, when you think of professional development, bandanas, s'mores, and campfire songs might not be the first things that come to mind. Yet when we designed the kickoff for our school's first Technology Summer Camp, those festive features helped us set the mood right from the start -- this wouldn't be your ordinary PD. What Is Technology Summer Camp? Technology Summer Camp is an exploratory, collaborative, self-paced professional learning experience.

300+ Awesome Free Internet Resources You Should Know Ali Mese is a freelancer, wanderer, and contributor to few startup projects. Say hi on Facebook or Twitter. This post originally appeared on his Medium blog. I’ve prepared a list of 300 web resources that are not only awesome, but free to use. Please let me know if I am missing any other useful resource! Business + Marketing 5 Great Online Tools for Creating Infographics Professional infographic designers rely primarily on a core vector graphics software program to create their infographics designs. The main advantage is that all the icons, charts, images, illustrations, and data visualizations are treated as separate objects that can be easily moved, resized, overlapped, and rotated. No matter where you create the individual design elements, the final infographic design is usually put together in a vector graphics program. Creating infographics using online tools has never been easier.

Assessing Student Progress Using Blog-Based Porfolios Editor’s note: Kathy Cassidy is the author of a new book from Powerful Learning Press, Connected from the Start: Global Learning in the Primary Grades. During a recent webinar (free archive here), Kathy shared many ideas from Chapter 5 of the book, “Using Blogs as Digital Portfolios.” The webinar was rich in content and full of great discussion — so much so that there simply wasn’t time for Kathy to share her thoughts, in depth, about where formative and summative assessments might fit into this digital blog/portfolio model. So we’ve asked her to write this article. Much as she does in her eBook, she’s included short videos, useful downloads, and links to other valuable resources. ~ John Norton

Digital Storytelling at UR This is a sample assignment that faculty can use as a guideline for integrating digital storytelling projects in their courses. Please feel free to repurpose, modify and contextualize the objectives and requirements accordingly. Objective The purpose of this project is for students to create a multimedia presentation in the form of a digital story. A digital story is the result of a narrative that is written, recorded as audio and amplified with a sequence of images. This story should be compelling and meaningful and may also be personally relevant.

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