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Territoires en Transition France

Territoires en Transition France

http://www.transitionfrance.fr/

Related:  Villes en transitiontheomalquesUrban ressourcesTRANSITIONSTransformation Sociale - Réseau

Island in the sun: Why are our cities heating up faster than everywhere else? There are hot islands, there are really hot islands, and then there are urban heat islands [PDF] — cities that are hotter, often considerably, than their more rural surrounds. Sound a little strange? Well, you can tell your foil hat-wearing, climate-denying friends it’s nothing new, having been documented as far back as 1810. Simply put, cutting down all the trees, paving over every inch of earth, burying streams in storm drains, and building enormous structures warms things up a bit. Some may like it hot, but the good folks of Louisville, Ky., will tell you that it’s not always a good thing. Cursed with often stagnant wind conditions, a dense urban center, and fewer trees than Paul Bunyan’s backyard, Louisville has seen temperatures rise 1.67 degrees F every decade since 1961.

Ecological Futures: Contemporary Art and Anthropocene Studies Ecological Futures: Contemporary Art and Anthropocene Studies This seminar will take as its focus attempts within both environmental thought and contemporary art to imagine the ecological future. These range from visualisations of technocratic dystopias in which all the worst predications of environmental disaster come true, to the wished for emergence of sustainable communities thriving in a new age of planetary consciousness. While some have tried to imagine a literally post-human ‘world without us’ in the geologically not so distant future, others explore the idea that in the wake of large scale anthropogenic change the natural world will never be the same again.

Reinterpreting Green Space in cities This post is also available in: Chinese (Traditional) ‘A product of the creative encounter between the man-made and the natural, between order and disorder, the garden can offer productive metaphors for the interactions between human life and time, care, thought or space.’ The fate of the city garden has been featured on This Big City in the past. German ′Transition Towns′ ride wave of change The water simply won't boil. No surprise really. The pot is far too large for the small camping stove. Cornelia Dorsch takes off the lid to check whether she can add the vegetables yet. She's standing in front of a makeshift table on Servatii Square, where she's about to serve free soup to passersby.

Public Software Group e. V. · LiquidFeedback LiquidFeedback is an open-source software, powering internet platforms for proposition development and decision making. LiquidFeedback is an independent open source project published under MIT license by the Public Software Group of Berlin, Germany. The developers of LiquidFeedback have joined together in the Interaktive Demokratie association to promote the use of electronic media for democratic processes.

Richard M. Daley wants to make your city more sustainable Richard M. Daley, who served six terms as mayor of Chicago from 1989 to 2011, was one of the first big-city mayors to focus on sustainable development. Some of his projects, such as the development of Millennium Park, flourished. Others are more likely to be remembered as flops — Chicago taxpayers may lose money on a solar-power deal Daley negotiated, and his administration spent millions of dollars on recycling initiatives that went nowhere. Cities are the new laboratories of evolution Cities are driving rapid evolutionary changes to plant and animal species, according to a study published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Usually, we think of evolution as happening in remote, isolated, or pristine places—the Galapagos Islands, for example. But the new findings suggest that scientists can’t understand evolution as it’s currently occurring without grappling with the complex and expanding urban landscape. An international team of researchers searched the scientific literature for data on changes in the phenotype—meaning outward characteristics, like appearance and behavior—of species living in different environments.

Imagining an Elastic City Planters and urban gardening tools at Kennedy Greenway in central Boston, the site of the Occupy Boston encampment. Last spring, after attending a panel about urbanism in Mumbai, I wrote a blog post about what I called the "entropic city" — one that is constantly changing and re-imagining itself. “Entropy,” I argued, “is a cultural and an economic necessity. cohousing cultures CoHousing Cultures: self-organized, community-oriented and sustainable. Integrating, non-speculative and open to the neighborhood. Innovative projects motivated by a search for ecological, affordable and socially designed homes. This book illustrates a colorful diversity of European examples including a cooperative’s barrier-free renovation of an old school in Berlin, collective housing for the 40+ generation in Stockholm and passive architecture planned by and for immigrants in Brussels. Become active! A contact list offers tips for further research.

Halkevleri - Wikipedia Halkevleri (singular Halkevi literally meaning "people's houses", also translatable as "community centres") is the name of a Turkish state sponsored enlightenment project. Its history can be reviewed in three distinct eras; between 1932-1951 (1st era), 1963-1980 (2nd era) and after 1987 (3rd era). [1] Halkevleri in Mayday 2012 How Cities and Wildlife Can Be Friends Instead of Enemies We generally think of cities as devoid of nature. These crowded, homogenized, noisy environments seem to be the exact opposite of natural, and we’re correct in surmising that their creation is detrimental to wild species. “We paved paradise and put up a parking lot,” as the song goes. But recent research suggests that while it may not be her first choice, Mother Nature’s adaptation skills make it possible for cities and wildlife to coexist, and even flourish. Charles Nilon, a professor of fisheries and wildlife at the University of Missouri, recently published a study which found that while urbanization is hurting overall biodiversity, certain birds and plants thrive in cities. The results of this study suggest that paying more attention to the way we design and develop our urban areas could encourage a more symbiotic relationship between humans and the flora and fauna.

Great Transition The Great Transition is a term used by the Global Scenario Group (GSG) to describe a vision of a just and sustainable global future.[1] The term was originally used by Kenneth E. Bouldings in The Meaning of the 20th Century - The Great Transition, Harper Colophon Books Copyright 1964, considered a hallmark conception of systems thinking and the shift from pre-modern to post-modern culture and the four possible traps that will allow humanity to successful journey the Great Transition. The elements of the Great Transition vision include egalitarian social and ecological values, increased human interconnectedness, improved quality of life, and a healthy planet, as well as an absence of poverty, war, and environmental destruction.[2] The Great Transition concept has been adopted by numerous individuals and organizations in the sustainability sphere, most notably by Jigmi Y. Background[edit] Alternative scenarios[edit]

Related:  gaspillage alimentaireTerritoires en mutationà trierTransition énergétiquetransition énergétiqueSites Ecologie@ Urban PermacultureCausses Quercy 2040Transition et AutogestionsophiecccTERRITOIRES EN TRANSITION