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Angela Lee Duckworth: The key to success? Grit

Angela Lee Duckworth: The key to success? Grit
Angela Lee Duckworth: The key to success? Grit Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

http://www.ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_the_key_to_success_grit

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Francis by Richard Hickey Written by novelist & screenwriter Dave Eggars, for the ever-popular radio show This American Life, animated film Francis is the tense tale of the unexplained happenings on a lake in the middle of an Ontario nature preserve. Brought to life by Not to Scale director Richard Hickey and a team of 40 animators, this captivating short perfectly blends the worlds of outstanding production values with engaging storytelling. Her mouth went dry.

How can you change from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset? Step1. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice.” As you approach a challenge, that voice might say to you “Are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don’t have the talent.” “What if you fail—you’ll be a failure” “People will laugh at you for thinking you had talent.” Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead? hide captionAt the Lenox Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., educators try to teach kids to see struggle as a normal part of learning. Tovia Smith/NPR At the Lenox Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., educators try to teach kids to see struggle as a normal part of learning. Tovia Smith reported this audio story in two parts on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

3C's to Supporting Student Success When students are having remarkable success, people want to know how. "What is it that you do?" they ask. "What makes your students so successful?" I have reflected on this a lot. Research Statement Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015). On average, individuals who are gritty are more self-controlled, but the correlation between these two traits is not perfect: Some individuals are paragons of grit but not self-control, and some exceptionally well-regulated individuals are not especially gritty (Duckworth & Gross, 2014). [ Continue Reading Research Statement ] [ CV ] Scales and Measures

The School of Life - Developing Emotional Intelligence Know Yourself Prompt Cards These cards are designed to assist us in a journey of self-knowledge; they present us with a range of ideas and questions that can help us to understand ourselves better. £10 Gift E-Voucher An original gift, delivered instantly by email. This electronic voucher can be used across any of our London events or spent in The School of Life online or London shops. £25, £50 or £100. Writing as Therapy Journals Writing is ultimately the task of discovering and developing what we think.

How a Shoe Can Teach Responsibility How a Shoe Can Teach Responsibility By Marjan Glavac closeAuthor: Marjan Glavac Name: Marjan GlavacSite: Marjan is currently a gr.6 home room teacher at Wilfrid Jury Public School in London, Ontario, Canada where he resides with his wife and two children. For more information about Marjan Glavac, his books, keynotes, training and seminars, visit him at his site at Authors Posts (51) thebusyeducator.com Chipotle Original Series NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. A PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 30364 to opt out and to discontinue further participation in the Sweepstakes.

The Language of Choice and Support Language shapes our worldview. The narratives we hear around us influence our perceptions and understandings. Take Carol Dweck's concept of fixed versus growth mindset. One of the primary tools for fostering a growth mindset is changing how we talk about learning, from how we give feedback to how we address failure. Dweck's work shows that simple shifts in language of praise and feedback can hold immense power in children's view of themselves and of learning. We should harness this same power to better support our students who struggle with mental health challenges on a daily basis. How to Work Like the Masters Written by Jay of Dumb Little Man. When I need work done on my car, I consult with a mechanic. When it's time to build a deck in the backyard, I will search for an expert and listen to what he says. So when it comes to life itself, why wouldn't you at least consider what experts think? Trust me, I completely understand that the term 'expert' is often self-proclaimed. Nevertheless, it is up to you to hear, interpret, and evaluate information.

50 ways to use video in the classroom – EFL CLASSROOM 2.0 I will be travelling quite a bit this year to conferences and schools, speaking about a lifelong teaching passion - the use of video as an educational material. It is something I've promoted and developed many language learning ideas around - foremost through my work on EnglishCentral. So enjoy these practical ideas for using this most "real" material with your students, Each idea has a recommended example - just click "View It". Also get this as a lecture presentation with examples HERE. Get all the 50 lists HERE. How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn Jane Mount/MindShift A few years ago, psychologist David Yeager and his colleagues noticed something interesting while interviewing high school students in the San Francisco Bay Area about their hopes, dreams and life goals. It was no surprise that students often said that making money, attaining fame or pursuing a career that they enjoyed were important to them. But many of them also spoke of additionally wanting to make a positive impact on their community or society — such as by becoming a doctor to take care of people, or a pastor who “makes a difference.”

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