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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students
My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute. I think she was treading lightly on the ever-so shaky ego of a brand-new teacher while still giving me some very necessary feedback. So that day, I learned about wait/think time. Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own. Keeping It Simple I also learned over the years that asking straightforward, simply-worded questions can be just as effective as those intricate ones. #1. This question interrupts us from telling too much. #2. #3. #4. #5. How do you ask questions in your classroom?

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/five-powerful-questions-teachers-ask-students-rebecca-alber

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IEP Goal Bank Articulation Goals: Long Term Goal: Student will produce the // speech sound with 90% mastery. Short Term Objectives: 1. S. will produce // in isolation with 90% accuracy. 2. S. will produce // in syllables with 90% accuracy. 3.

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