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Bloom's taxonomy

Bloom's taxonomy
"Taxonomy” simply means “classification”, so the well-known taxonomy of learning objectives is an attempt (within the behavioural paradigm) to classify forms and levels of learning. It identifies three “domains” of learning (see below), each of which is organised as a series of levels or pre-requisites. It is suggested that one cannot effectively — or ought not try to — address higher levels until those below them have been covered (it is thus effectively serial in structure). Cognitive: the most-used of the domains, refers to knowledge structures (although sheer “knowing the facts” is its bottom level). The model above is included because it is still common currency, but Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) have made some apparently minor but actually significant modifications, to come up with: Revised taxonomy of the cognitive domain following Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) In higher education, "understand" is still—in my view—problematic in its positioning. Yet more

Selecting Technologies | UNSW Teaching Staff Gateway This page helps you choose among various technologies (not just LMSs) using two approaches: examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that could achieve those outcomes, and how those activities could be supported by various learning technologies examples of the tools you may be interested in using and the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. Table 1: Sample learning outcomes, rationales and activities The following table provides examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that promote those outcomes, and how the activities could be supported by learning technologies. Table 2: Tools related to activities, and their contribution to learning outcomes The following table provides examples of the tools you may be interested in using and looks at the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. See also on this section of the website:

mrssherbondy - Web 2.0 Tools Summer Session Get your Wikispaces Classroom now: the easiest way to manage your class. guest Join | Help | Sign In mrssherbondy Home guest| Join | Help | Sign In Turn off "Getting Started" Loading... Improving student assessment The issue Effective assessment has greater bearing on successful learning than almost any other factor. Increasing student numbers are adding to marking workloads for staff and students express more dissatisfaction with assessment and feedback than with any other aspect of their learning experience, according to the National Student Survey (2011). How technology can help Technology can enable different, new and more immediate methods of assessment, helping to reduce staff workloads whilst improving the quality of assessment and feedback for students. Resources Looking ahead Our new Assessment and Feedback programme, which runs to August 2014, is focusing on large-scale changes in assessment practice supported by technology, with a view to delivering information on tangible benefits and transferable practice.

Hurricane Sandy Gas Station Crisis Sees Solution From New Jersey High School Students Kim Johnson looks over the destruction near her seaside apartment in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)A videographer shoots a house in Toronto on Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012 that was crushed by a tree felled in superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Frank Gunn)Homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point are shown, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood.

Teaching ESL Online 19 Successful Online English Teachers Share Their Tips and Resources for Planning Online Lessons Thanks to everyone who contributed! I receive A LOT of emails from online teachers (and online teachers to be) about planning; namely, what they should include in their lessons and what resources they should use. As there are many areas of English and different teaching methods, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. However, there are some common practices and amazing resources that you can use in your online lessons. And as a way of celebrating the incredible teachers who create their own content so that we can use it with our students, I have put together this super post: I asked 19 online teachers for a tip or an app when it comes to lesson planning, and for them to share their resource. (At the bottom of the post there is a chance for you to add your own resources.) Gabby Wallace Make sure that each lesson has a clear takeaway. WHAT’S YOUR RESOURCE? Kieran Docherty WHAT’S YOUR RESOURCE? All of the lessons are categorised according to age appropriateness, level and topic. Mau Buchler

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