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Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management
Knowledge management (KM) is the process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using organizational knowledge.[1] It refers to a multi-disciplined approach to achieving organisational objectives by making the best use of knowledge.[2] An established discipline since 1991 (see Nonaka 1991), KM includes courses taught in the fields of business administration, information systems, management, and library and information sciences.[3][4] More recently, other fields have started contributing to KM research; these include information and media, computer science, public health, and public policy.[5] Columbia University and Kent State University offer dedicated Master of Science degrees in Knowledge Management.[6][7][8] History[edit] In 1999, the term personal knowledge management was introduced; it refers to the management of knowledge at the individual level.[14] Research[edit] Dimensions[edit] The Knowledge Spiral as described by Nonaka & Takeuchi. Strategies[edit] Motivations[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge_management

Related:  Time ManagementProductivityProductivitycognitivism

Time management Time management is the act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity. It is a meta-activity with the goal to maximize the overall benefit of a set of other activities within the boundary condition of a limited amount of time. Time management may be aided by a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects, and goals complying with a due date. Initially, time management referred to just business or work activities, but eventually the term broadened to include personal activities as well.

7 Secrets of the Super Organized A few years ago, my life was a mess. So was my house, my desk, my mind. Then I learned, one by one, a few habits that got me completely organized. Am I perfect? Of course not, and I don’t aim to be. A Formula to Stop You from Overcommitting Your Time When I dive into time coaching clients’ schedules, I consistently discover that people misdiagnose themselves as having a “productivity” problem when, in fact, their bigger issue is an overcommitment problem. When they have committed to more external projects and personal goals and obligations than they have hours for in the day, they feel the massive weight of time debt. One of my coaching clients suffered from a huge amount of false guilt until he realized he had the unrealistic expectation that he could fit 160 hours of tasks into a 40-hour workweek. Effective time investment begins with accepting the reality that time is a finite resource.

Education Theory/Constructivism and Social Constructivism - UCD - CTAG "Constructivism is the philosophical and scientific position that knowledge arises through a process of active construction."(Mascolol & Fischer, 2005) "As long as there were people asking each other questions, we have had constructivist classrooms. Constructivism, the study of learning, is about how we all make sense of our world, and that really hasn’t changed." Knowledge sharing culture creation inShare96 There is a fundamental problem that exists in the typical business workplace today. Chances are that you or someone in your office is already painfully aware of it. We’ve seen an explosion in the number of people whose jobs are directly related to their expertise, and for whom ‘what they know’ has become a kind of ‘insurance’ plan. Have you ever heard a colleague proclaim “If I’m the only one who knows how to do this, ‘they’ can never fire me.” We’ve all heard similar comments and perhaps even nodded along, or said the words ourselves.

Passing The Holy Milestone: How To Meet Deadlines Advertisement For too many projects, there comes a time when every action taken, every decision and sacrifice made, is spurred on by pressure to finish. Tempers seem to shrink along with the available days, talk about “high standards” gives way to “good enough,” and people realize that deadlines are aptly named. During the last-minute crunch, someone may well wonder, how did it come to this? Could it have been prevented? Every Web project has deadlines.

50 Tips to Maximize Productivity Here are commonsense yet practical tips on how we can maximize productivity in our daily lives. Try out some of these for yourself and discover which ones work best for you. 1. Write a list of the main tasks you want to complete throughout the day. 2. How To Make a Table in Evernote Posted by Kristina Hjelsand on 21 May 2015 Comment Evernote has a multitude of features to keep you organized and productive. One we really like for organizing information is the option to make simple, adjustable tables. We can hear you asking, “Why wouldn’t I use a spreadsheet for that?” Well, spreadsheets are great for things like financial planning, but using them for simple projects and tasks is like using a hammer to squash a fly: overkill.

Schema (psychology) In psychology and cognitive science, a schema (plural schemata or schemas) describes an organized pattern of thought or behavior that organizes categories of information and the relationships among them.[1] It can also be described as a mental structure of preconceived ideas, a framework representing some aspect of the world, or a system of organizing and perceiving new information.[2] Schemata influence attention and the absorption of new knowledge: people are more likely to notice things that fit into their schema, while re-interpreting contradictions to the schema as exceptions or distorting them to fit. Schemata have a tendency to remain unchanged, even in the face of contradictory information. Schemata can help in understanding the world and the rapidly changing environment.[3] People can organize new perceptions into schemata quickly as most situations do not require complex thought when using schema, since automatic thought is all that is required.[3]

The filter hierarchy There's more information, provocations, riffs, causes, meetings, opportunities, viral videos, technologies and policies coming at you than ever. So, how do you rank the incoming? How do you decide what to expose yourself to next? Email from your bossPersonal note from a good friendThree or four recommendations from trusted colleagues, each with the same linkA trending topic on TwitterThe latest on RedditPhone call from your momFile on the intranet you're supposed to read before the end of the weekSpam email from a strangerTenth note from Eddie Bauer, this one to an email address you haven't used in a yearPost on Google + from a friend of a friendFacebook update from someone you haven't seen in ten yearsAngry tweet from someone you've never metCommercial on the radio that's playing softly in the backgroundEmail from someone who had your back one day when it really and truly mattered!!!

21 Frugal Ways to Reward Yourself Right Now Wise Bread Picks Like many of you, I’m busy. I have a full-time career, a husband and a home to take care of, and I play daddy to two adorable dogs. I don’t know how I do it, but I do. Sometimes, though, I need a break — a little reward for staying semi-sane. 4 Things You Thought Were True About Time Management - Amy Gallo by Amy Gallo | 1:00 PM July 22, 2014 I don’t know anyone who doesn’t struggle with how to make the most of their time at work. How do you stay on top of an overflowing inbox?

What Successful People Do With The First Hour Of Their Work Day Remember when you used to have a period at the beginning of every day to think about your schedule, catch up with friends, maybe knock out a few tasks? It was called home room, and it went away after high school. But many successful people schedule themselves a kind of grown-up home room every day. You should too. The first hour of the workday goes a bit differently for Craig Newmark of Craigslist, David Karp of Tumblr, motivational speaker Tony Robbins, career writer (and Fast Company blogger) Brian Tracy, and others, and they’ll tell you it makes a big difference.

7 Ways to Reward Yourself for Greater Productivity Rewards are a powerful way to motivate yourself to get things done. These “carrots” are the entire foundation of my productivity system because they encourage you to delay gratification until you’ve made significant progress with your most important tasks, goals, and daily habits. But in order to make a personal rewards system effective, you’ve got to be creative and you’ve got to customize your rewards list to give YOU incentive. Nobody knows what motivates you as well as you do, so it’s critical to spend time thinking about (even dreaming about) your pots of gold at the end of the rainbow.

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