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How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time

How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time
“How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.” If you’ve ever ran more than a few miles, you probably understand why you need to pace yourself. Runners that sprint at the start of a race will be exhausted far before they cross the finish line. The same principle applies when trying to get work done. One solution for pacing my work that I’ve found incredibly effective is maintaining weekly/daily to-do lists. Weekly/Daily To-Do Lists The principle behind the WD To-Do List method is simple: At the end of the week, write a list containing everything you want to get accomplished.At the end of the day, write a list containing what parts of that weekly list you want to be finished tomorrow. After you finish your daily list, you stop. Although this technique might sound obvious (and it is), there are some key advantages using a WD system has over the typical, Getting Things Done approach of keeping Next Action or project lists. Why the Weekly/Daily To-Do List System Rocks: Focus on the Daily List

http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2008/04/08/how-to-finish-your-work-one-bite-at-a-time/

Related:  lifestyleProductivity StrategiesProductivityPersonal OrganizationORGANIZATION & PRODUCTIVITY & TO DO LISTS

5 Ways to Make Your To-Do Lists More Effective To-do lists seem pretty straightforward: A list of all of the tasks you plan to accomplish during any given day or week. And, really, there are few things more satisfying than drawing lines through each entry. Progress! But, many times, they balloon to unrealistic levels, and we end up feeling overwhelmed and ineffective. That’s usually because we’re using them as a catch-all for every task that’s thrown at us. Instead, our lists should be derived from our larger goals and include tasks that move us toward those big-picture endeavors, says Robert C. 5 Unusual Tricks For Actually Reaching Your New Year's Goals With the new year rolling around, most of us are planning ways to improve our health, set some big goals, and finally achieve things we have been putting off for a while. But when you look at the statistics, almost 80% of people will fail by the springtime, and after a year, only a smaller percentage of people are still involved with their goals at all. So here’s how to be that tiny percentage of people that are still going strong a year later. #1 Follow intrinsic motivation… rather than forcing yourself. Let me ask you this: do you think the typical person who just begins working out during the new year will still be exercising if: They’re intrinsically motivated (they like it)They’re forcing themselves to do it by using rewards (money/food), punishments, etc.

Developing self discipline Time management series Self-discipline Self-discipline can be considered a type of selective training, creating new habits ofthought, action, and speech toward improving yourself and reaching goals. Self-discipline can also be task oriented and selective.View self-discipline as positive effort, rather than one of denial. Schedule a small task for a given time of the day; Practice deliberate delaying. Schedule a particular task in the morning and once in the evening.

Clean Out Your To-Do List for Guilt-Free Productivity This is a great article. After trying different methods I find having 2 'to do lists' really works. The 1st list is a must follow list, which is broken down into what to do today, this week and this month, it covers routine requirements with space to add ad hoc extras as they arise e.g. phone client etc.

Course of Actions - Task Flow Mapping Your Day One of the things I’ve found when listing out tasks and actions, is the difficulty of organizing a list into a logical flow. Most of my day is filled with tasks that I need or want to complete in a specific order, and I wanted a simple way to map out the flow of my day. When I set out to find a way to do this, I had several criteria in mind: It had to be simple – I didn’t want a lot of options or stuff to fill in. How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done - 5 Expert Tips Some days the to-do list seems bottomless. Just looking at it is exhausting. We all want to know how to stop being lazy and get more done. I certainly want the answer. So I decided to call a friend who manages to do this — and more.

The Brain-Based Secret to Personal Productivity By now, you've probably already broken most of your New Year's resolutions. You're not alone: Only about 8 percent of those who make them keep them. But it may not be that you'll never lose weight or learn a foreign language. If you aren't being productive or if you feel off track, it could simply be because you haven't set yourself up for success in a way that suits your individuality. Take a typical New Year's resolution like running.

8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. On his computer sat even more stray objects than his surrounding environment.

Building a Smarter To-Do List, Part I Since new folks visit 43F each day, I thought it might be valuable to return to one of our most popular evergreen topics to review some "best practices" for keeping a good to-do list. While a lot of this might be old hat to some of you, it's a good chance to review the habits and patterns behind one of the most powerful tools in the shed. Part 2 appears tomorrow (Update: now available). (N.B.: links to previous posts related to these topics are provided inline) Why bother? In my own experience wrangling life's entropic challenges, some of my best gains have come from maintaining a smart, actionable, and updated accounting of all the things I've committed myself to doing.

Dave Lee — Introducing the Week Chart Update: Thanks Lifehacker for picking up this post. (This is Part 3 in a series about My Productivity System.) In this post I’d like to share with you the Week Chart. It’s part of my recipe to keep focused and release incredible amounts of creativity throughout the week. Here’s what the Week Chart looks like this: Time Management Tips: How to Find the Right Mindset to Succeed With Time Management For the past several years I have worked with time management techniques such as lists, prioritization, planning and so on. But it wasn’t until I adopted a Quadrant 2 mindset that I really started seeing results. The phrase “Quadrant 2” comes from Stephen Coveys book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People . Every task you need to do can be split into one of the 4 quadrants:

10 Laws of Productivity You might think that creatives as diverse as Internet entrepreneur Jack Dorsey, industrial design firm Studio 7.5, and bestselling Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami would have little in common. In fact, the tenets that guide how they – and exceptionally productive creatives across the board – make ideas happen are incredibly similar. Here are 10 laws of productivity we’ve consistently observed among serial idea executors: 1. Break the seal of hesitation. A bias toward action is the most common trait we’ve found across the hundreds of creative professionals and entrepreneurs we’ve interviewed.

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