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GTD Toolbox: 100+ Resources for Getting Things Done

GTD Toolbox: 100+ Resources for Getting Things Done
Getting Things Done, also abbreviated as GTD, is a popular time management productivity method created by David Allen. The method is just as popular today as it was back in 2007 when we ran our GTD Ninja post featuring more than 50 apps to help you be more productive and organized. But there are a host of new applications out there to help you be even more productive this year. Below are more than 100 of them. What are your favorite GTD tools? Tell us more about them in the comments. Complete Solutions iGTD - A free Mac OS X app. Kinkless GTD - Free Applescripts for OmniOutliner Pro for implementing GTD-style task management. OmniFocus - A Mac OS X GTD system that also works with your iPhone. tasktoy - A GTD app that includes printable lists and mobile access. Todoist - A simple GTD app with a built-in calendar, Gmail integration, and more. GTDInbox - A Firefox addon for using Gmail for GTD. Nexty - A PHP GTD tool that you can install on a local server. TaskFreak! Collect and Process Notezz!

http://mashable.com/2009/01/29/getting-things-done/

Related:  Productivity

Start Every Day as a Producer, Not a Consumer I have to agree that my most productive days are those where I don't allow myself to read the news, check e-mail, facebook, etc., right after I get up. However, that happens because I've got a ton of stuff to get done, and the outside world takes a back seat until my workload is under control. However, there are certain biological necessities that have to happen before I can be productive. The dog gets let out, I go to the bathroom, I eat/drink something, and *then* I sit down to be productive. I also *have* to check my e-mail, because if something blew up overnight or there's something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I need to know as early as possible.

Getting started with "Getting Things Done" This article was originally posted during the first week of 43 Folders' existence, and, pound for pound, it remains our most popular page on the site. Please be sure to also visit related pages, browse our GTD topic area, plus, of course you can search on GTD across our family of sites. I’ll be talking a lot here in coming weeks about Getting Things Done, a book by David Allen whose apt subtitle is “The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.” You’ve probably heard about it around the Global Interweb or have been buttonholed by somebody in your office who swears by GTD. (It probably takes a backseat only to the Atkins Diet in terms of the number of enthusiastic evangelists: sorry about that.)

Getting Things Done The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows one to focus attention on taking action on tasks, instead of on recalling them. First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade and incorporate recent scientific research supporting the system's claims regarding how the mind functions.[2]

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity Summary at WikiSummaries, free book summaries GTD® and Getting Things Done® are the registered trademarks of David Allen Company. For more than 20 years, David Allen has been a management consultant and executive coach. Allen’s first book Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, published in 2001, became a National Bestseller. Taming the Mammoth: Why You Should Stop Caring What Other People Think Part 1: Meet Your Mammoth The first day I was in second grade, I came to school and noticed that there was a new, very pretty girl in the class—someone who hadn’t been there the previous two years. Her name was Alana and within an hour, she was everything to me. When you’re seven, there aren’t really any actionable steps you can take when you’re in love with someone. You’re not even sure what you want from the situation. There’s just this amorphous yearning that’s a part of your life, and that’s that.

10 free tools to make your work easier Whether you’re a CEO or a student, we bet that you’re busy. We’ve put together a list of our ten favourite free tools to add hours to your day. Trello Trello, where have you been all our life? Trello is the perfect tool to organise your work and your life. This visual list tool can help you lead large-scales project at work, and even manage your housemates. 12 Free Android Apps to Help Get Things Done (Part 1) With a raft of new devices scheduled to join the lonely T-Mobile G1 in Google’s lineup, the Android operating system looks like it’s not only going to be around for a while but may well give its fellows smartphones from Apple, Blackberry, and Palm a run for their money. With its Linux-derived core and slick user interface, the Android system is proving to be very adaptable – it will even be available on netbooks pretty soon. I’ve had a chance to play with a 1 for the last few weeks, and more importantly to try out some of the 5,000 apps currently available on the Market, Google’s built-in alternative to the iTunes App Store. Out of this amazing variety of available applications, I’ve found a good dozen free ones that would be perfect for Lifehack’s readers – apps that can help you stay organized, stay effective, and stay productive no matter where you find yourself. In the interest of space, I’ll post this list over two days: six now, six later, presented in no particular order. 1.

Getting Things Done Unix Crosses Over Productivity I try to keep my approach to productivity and life as simple as possible. I do not like a bunch of clutter in my personal or work life. I am not sure where this philosophy stems from, I am sure childhood, so far it has served me well. 9-powerful-habits-for-getting-important-things-done-and-building-your-willpower- We all know that sinking feeling. A deadline is drawing closer and you haven't even started yet. You begin to panic and a dull nausea sets in. There is nothing worse than having two hours remaining to complete a project that you know will take more like five. You sit there saying to yourself, "Why didn't I get this started yesterday?"

The Open Plan Office Trap: Why It Pays To Work Alone There is a prevailing notion that open plan offices foster open communication among staff and make for a livelier workplace. But they are also facing a backlash as people begin to realise their shortcomings. We take a deeper look at the pros and cons of open plan offices and why working alone is underrated. Open plan office image from Shutterstock If you visit the offices of most start-ups, chances are you’d be greeted with wide open spaces where some people don’t even have their own desks (hot-desking is so hot right now, natch). Gone are the ugly cubicles that had been an institution in offices for so long.

Getting Things Done® (GTD®) Getting Things Done (GTD) is a method for organizing tasks so that you can focus your entire energy and creativity on completing those tasks in a stress free manner. This method was developed by David Allen in his book, Getting Things Done. The main principle of GTD is that recording your tasks in a reliable way - using a system that you trust - will free your mind from trying to remember and prioritize stuff. This recaptured mental energy can be put towards being more productive and efficient. Collection The first step to GTD is collecting all of the information that is bouncing around in your head by getting it out of your mind.

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