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Gamification

Gamification
Categorization[edit] Gamification in a narrow sense is used in a non-game context, is built into the service system, and is aiming at an infinite experience. It does not aim at creating a game but offering a gameful experience. In a broader sense gamification also includes game context such as in serious games and finite and infinite games.[20] Another categorization compares gamification with other gameful approaches by looking at characteristics such as spontaneity, rules, or goals:[20] Techniques[edit] Gamification techniques strive to leverage people's natural desires for socializing, learning, mastery, competition, achievement, status, self-expression, altruism, or closure. Another approach to gamification is to make existing tasks feel more like games.[27] Some techniques used in this approach include adding meaningful choice, onboarding with a tutorial, increasing challenge,[28] and adding narrative.[27] Applications[edit] Gamification has been widely applied in marketing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamification

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State of the Industry: 2012 Trends and 2013 Predictions- Hand in Hand Nov 7 2012 | Loyalty Management: Articles Type By: Dan Dufault, Merchant Warehouse • 31 views Back To Results 2012 has been the year of “testing” new mobile and payment technologies including loyalty and reward programs. These new technologies have driven more change in the payments industry in the past year than over the last decade and there is sure to be an acceleration in this movement in 2013.

As websites become games, understand the trend with the Gamification Encyclopedia 11 January '11, 03:20pm Follow One of the biggest trends we’ve seen on the Web in the past year has been the growing “Gamification” of websites and online services. Paper Towel Problem Solved I had a problem. In my classroom bathroom (my room used to be a preschool classroom), I would find tons of paper towel trash all over the floor whenever students washed their hands after a messy project. I tried just remind them to get their paper towel in the trash can and telling them we shouldn't make our awesome custodians' jobs harder and none of it worked. I printed a really simple sign (shown above) that says: Paper Towel in the Trash Can 100 POINTS!!!

Five Essential Steps for Gamifying Education Whether you are considering gamifying a single lesson, an entire curriculum, or a whole school, it can be a daunting and confusing process. Those who try their hand at integrating game mechanics into the classroom setting may meet with less than stellar results and give up after just one attempt. But effective gamification is a complex undertaking that requires both the motivation to work harder at making learning engaging for students and the dedication to experience, accept, and learn from failures when doing so. I have spent the past year gamifying my college-level composition courses and, while I am still by no means an expert at gamifying education, I have, in the process, learned a few things from my own failures.

Education Levels Up! – A noObs guide to Gamifying your Classroom A new way to manage classroom instruction is slowly creeping into the world of education: “Gamification“. Gamifying simply means turning the class content and the way students learn into a game with a rewards system, quests, experience levels, and healthy competition. Gamifying isn’t anything new; businesses and social websites have been using “gaming” to attract and keep users coming back for years now.

How to Use Game Mechanics to Reward Your Customers There's a green card. Then there's silver, gold, and platinum. And then there's the Centurion—the black American Express card. Will Wright on Gamifying the World: From SimCity to the Future Will Wright Shares His Experience on Gamifying Systems and Simulations One of the most phenomenal experiences of GSummit SF 2013 happened with Will Wright’s keynote talk. As the creator of SimCity and countless other games and simulations, Wright’s talk goes deeply into games’ and their effect on us as humans in society and what that means for gamification in the grand scheme of things. 7 user interface design trends you need to know about Designer Blog If you ever wondered what is the most overlooked aspect of design craft, look no further – it’s user interfaces. Good or bad, user interfaces are everywhere: on websites, on mobile phones, televisions sets, wrist watches, airplanes and washing machines. Some user interfaces take two people to operate.

S2T4W3: Gamification, Funware, Puzzle Building, Professor Teaches 1. Exploring Gamification Trends Some games are based on real life (like Football Manager), but what if we made life more like games. This trend has been growing over recent months. Sixty-two Reasons Why "Gamification" Is Played Out "Game mechanics" are the new digital hotness these days. Fueled by business books like Total Engagement, successful apps like Foursquare, and presentations-gone-viral like Jesse Schell's "gamepocalypse" talk, it seems like every damn thing on the Internet is getting some gamelike interaction grafted onto it like a cyborg appendage. And Sebastian Deterding, a designer and researcher at Hamburg University, has had enough. He distilled his thoughts on "gamification and its discontents" into an embeddable 62-slide presentation that's pithy and pretty in equal measure. Deterling attacks the gamification trend from a variety of angles, but his argument boils down to this: points, badges, and leaderboards do not a true game make. What they do make is distraction, confusion, and obsession with "fake achievement."

Playing games for employment: Defining the mission Young people dig into the problems they face when looking for jobs. Photo: Emerson College In one of our previous blog posts, we showed why we want to tackle the problem of youth unemployment in Moldova by playing games. We want to share some of our first steps of defining the game – together with our partners from Emerson College and the National Youth Council of Moldova. Gen Y vs. Gen X: Who Causes More IT Headaches? CIO CIO — You've heard the Gen Y stereotypes before: They're lazy workers, exude entitlement and have been reared on social technologies that they bring into the workplace, whether IT departments like it or not. A new Forrester Research (FORR) report sheds light on the latter issue, finding that Gen Y workers actually are not much different than Gen Xers or in some cases, even Baby Boomers, when it comes to their views on technology. Businesses should consider and rely more on this Gen Y group of employees when implementing policies and technologies, Forrester advises.

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