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Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google
At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online. We are always looking to improve these classes.

http://www.google.com/goodtoknow/web/curriculum/

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Infographic: Citizenship in the digital age By now it’s become clear: For all its wonders, the digital age has also introduced its fair share of challenges. From social media and cyberbullying to cybercrime, internet addiction and online privacy concerns, today’s students face a wide range of difficult issues that previous generations never had to think about. As a result, teachers, school leaders and parents are called on to add a whole new idea to our curricula: digital citizenship. And yet, we don’t have to start from scratch. The elements of digital citizenship, it turns out, are not so different from the basic tenets of traditional citizenship: Be kind, respectful and responsible, and just do the right thing. What’s new — for educators as well as students — is learning how to apply these ideals to the digital age.

5 Things Parents Should Know About COPPA Do you have a child that uses the Internet or plays with an app on your phone or tablet? Unless you live in Mad Men times, you've probably answered "yes" to these questions. Then, you should have heard about COPPA, right? As a new parent, I didn't until recently. I assumed it was the Barry Manilow song. Bully Stoppers New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook Released New Stop Bullying iBook ReleasedNew Stop Bullying iBook Released

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities. Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Cyber Safety : InformED Its always good to be cautious while on the internet. There are people in the cyber world who want to do harm to you or your computer. These are some good tips to keep in mind while you are surfing: Be careful about what you put on the web.

Digital Citizenship Week: 6 Resources for Educators Considering how ubiquitous smartphones and tablets have become, especially in high school and middle school, questions about managing use and educating students about digital etiquette are on a lot of educators' minds. This October, Common Sense Media is sponsoring Digital Citizenship Week from October 16 to October 22. And we wanted to pull together some of the best resources to help educators talk about digital responsibility and safety online.

Online Safety: A Teacher’s Guide to Dealing with Cyberbullying, Sexting, and Student Privacy Social media and text messages have blurred the lines between students’ school lives and private lives. While most schools take clear steps to protect students at school, more schools are beginning to consider the need to set policies that apply to students’ activities outside of school. When it comes to questionable online activities like cyberbullying and sexting, kids sometimes feel pressured to follow the crowd. Teachers can play a crucial role in setting high expectations for online behavior. Schools can open conversations about online safety so that students learn to set personal boundaries and feel more comfortable reporting incidents like bullying and harassment. Image via Flickr by Brad Flickinger.

HTG Explains: What the DMCA Is and How it Affects the Internet The Digital Millennium Contract is a US law passed in 1998 in an attempt to modernize copyright law to deal with the Internet. The DMCA has a number of provisions, but we’ll be focusing on the ones that have most affected the web we have today. In particular, we’ll be focusing on the “notice and takedown” provisions that provide “safe harbor” for many service providers, as well as the anti-circumvention provisions that criminalize many common actions. Safe Harbor & Takedown Notices The DMCA extends a “safe harbor” to “service providers,” defined as “a provider of online services or network access, or the operator of facilities therefor.” For example, if a user uploads a copyrighted video to YouTube, posts a copyrighted article on Tumblr, places a copyrighted file on Dropbox and shares links publically, or just hosts a copyright-infringing website with a web hosting provider, the provider of the service — YouTube, Tumblr, Dropbox, or the web host — is exempt from liability.

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity.

Teacher's Guide to Digital Citizenship The horror stories of young people not grasping the reach and influence of the content they put online are familiar to all of us. From the loss of job opportunities due to unprofessional pictures or comments on social media, to the more serious threats of abduction, and even the self-harm inspired by cyber bullying, the stakes are high. While students may often seem clueless to these dangers, some are starting to understand the risks.

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