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Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google

Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google
At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online. We are always looking to improve these classes.

http://www.google.com/goodtoknow/web/curriculum/

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About Creative Commons Want to let people share and use your photographs, but not allow companies to sell them?Looking for access to course materials from the world’s top universities?Want to encourage readers to re-publish your blog posts, as long as they give you credit? This Printable Digital Citizenship Poster Belongs In Your Classroom Bringing technology into your classroom means bringing your students into a more digital world. Its likely they already spend time there out of the classroom, but being the teacher and facilitator in an online space offers a good opportunity to present your students with the tools they need to be upstanding digital citizens when they use the online tools. Even though they may already use many of the online tools you’ll employ in your classroom, they may not have been explicitly taught many of the hallmarks of digital citizenship.

Our Space: Being a Responsible Citizen of the Digital World For most young people today, engagement with new digital media is a routine aspect of life. Through computers, mobile phones, and other handheld devices, youth can blog, tweet, participate in social networks like Facebook, play massive multi-player games, use online information sources, and share videos, stories, music, and art they’ve created. Important skills and knowledge can be gained from such activities, but there are also risks.

Resources – Safety Center – Google Whether you’re a parent, a teacher, a teen, or just curious about digital literacy and citizenship, you’ve come to the right place. Google and our partners have compiled a short list of helpful resources for getting to know the web. Read on, and continue to explore the wonders of the web with us. 10 Digital Citizenship Resources: The Web in the Classroom…Part 3 Welcome to the third article in a series devoted to facilitating proper student internet interaction in the classroom. This classroom might be 1 to 1 or might be using technology to leverage student centered learning. In this post I would like to explore resources that are available for facilitating proper digital citizenship in the classroom. This post provides 10 resources and the next will deliver 10 more. Before reading, please take a moment to subscribe by email or RSS and also give me a follow on Twitter at mjgormans.

10 Excellent Digital Citizenship Tips for Your Students and Kids Now that you have understood the basics of Digital Citizenship and have read the digital footprint guide, you night be in need of a handy graphic to share with your students to wrap it up all. Well, I have one for you. The graphic below features some wonderful tips and pieces of advice on how to develop good manners online.

Can you teach digital citizenship, if you are not an active digital citizen yourself? It seems that a number of participants in my Digital Citizenship workshop imagined they’d be learning about cyber safety for three days! Is that what comes to mind for some people when they hear the term digital citizenship? Instead, we explored what it means to BE a digital citizen and, by the end of the workshop, every one of them had become an active contributor online, developing confidence to participate as thoughtful, active citizens themselves. Can you teach digital citizenship, if you are not an active digital citizen yourself? During the workshop, participants reflected on the ways they engage online and categorised their online activities under the headings of CONSUME, CREATE or INTERACT. Participants also…

Think Before You Link Today’s fast-paced world provides students with an increasing number of digital tools at their fingertips – both in school and at home. As a teacher, it’s important to make digital safety a priority in your classroom and ensure that your students know how to act safely, responsibly, and thoughtfully online. The Intel® Security Digital Safety Program gives you the resources you need to educate your students how to make smart and secure decisions online. Using the interactive curriculum resources below, you and your students will gain critical information on cybersafety, cybersecurity, and cyberethics. The content is fueled by learnings from experts at Intel Security and the National Cyber Security Alliance and provides crucial lessons on stranger danger awareness, malware and malicious websites, and cyberbullying, making sure that your students grow to become responsible digital citizens.

Creative Commons : Creating Better Digital Citizens Let’s take a brief look at Creative Commons licensing and why it’s important for students to understand it. Being a good digital citizen is important, but all too often when students find pictures or other works online, they fail to understand what they can re-use and what they can’t. You can learn more in the Teacher Learning Community as Jerry Swiatek also discusses how to determine if something is available under Creative Commons and then explores the process of how to license something with a Creative Commons license. As a teacher, your number one rule should be to model proper digital citizenship for your students. Creative Commons Resources: Images To Use In Your Classroom

Ideas for Digital Citizenship PBL Projects More and more, we're hearing the term "Digital Citizenship." I think we should simply call it "Citizenship." In our increasingly connected world, what it means to be a citizen is contextualized by more than just our countries and communities; we are global citizens.

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