background preloader

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum for Grades 9-12

Related:  Digital CitizenshipInternet Safety

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette Educate Your Self/Connect with OthersDigital Literacy Protect Your Self/Protect Others Digital Rights and Responsibility Repetition 2 (third to fifth grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Access

Kids and Socializing Online Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing too much information or posting comments, photos, or videos that can damage a reputation or hurt someone's feelings. Applying real-world judgment can help minimize those risks. Remind Kids that Online Actions Have Consequences The words kids write and the images they post have consequences offline. Some of your child's profile may be seen by a broader audience than you — or they — are comfortable with, even if privacy settings are high. Even if you delete the information from a site, you have little control over older versions that may exist on other people's computers and may circulate online. Tell Kids to Limit What They Share Tell your kids why it's important to keep some things — about themselves, family members, and friends — to themselves.

The Core Rules of Netiquette -- Excerpted from Netiquette by Virginia Shea -- Albion.com The Core Rules of Netiquette are excerpted from the book Netiquette by Virginia Shea. Click on each rule for elaboration. Introduction Rule 1: Remember the Human Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth Rule 5: Make yourself look good online Rule 6: Share expert knowledge Rule 7: Help keep flame wars under control Rule 8: Respect other people's privacy Rule 9: Don't abuse your power Rule 10: Be forgiving of other people's mistakes Next page ...Previous page ...Core Rules ...Netiquette Contents

DIGITAL YOUTH RESEARCH | Kids' Informal Learning with Digital Media Table of Contents -- Netiquette, by Virginia Shea, page 7 for Netiquette by Virginia Shea published by Albion Books Front CoverTitle Page 3Copyright Page 4Author's Dedication 5Table of Contents 7Foreword by Guy Kawasaki 11Acknowledgements 13A Note on Terminology 15 Part IIntroduction to Netiquette Chapter 1When in Cyberspace... 19 Chapter 2The Many Domains of Cyberspace 25 The Internet 25 Commercial online services 28 Part IINetiquette Basics Part IIIBusiness Netiquette Chapter 10Electronic Mail at Work 91 The effects of email on the working world 92 Emailing the CEO 93 Emailing the company 94 Email overload-real 96 Email overload-imagined 97 Snail mail ignorers 98 The agony of automatic deletions 98 Chapter 11You, Your Company & Cyberspace 101 Netiquette and company policy 101 Netiquette vs. business etiquette 102 Company privacy policies 103 Part IVSocial Netiquette Part VLegal & Philosophical Issues in Netiquette Chapter 15Email Privacy--a Grand Illusion? Bibliography 143 Next Page ...

Lesson Ideas These lesson plans were perhaps the most popular activity for last year's Digital Learning Day. The links provide a ready-made activity that you can use with your students on Digital Learning Day and beyond. You will see that each lesson includes a full lesson plan and a short video introduction from the Digital Learning Day teacher who submitted the lesson. If you plan to use a lesson on Digital Learning Day in your classroom or school, make sure to add this activity to our map. Visit the toolkits for more lesson plans, tools to use, and tips from teachers in specific areas! I Am Malala In this innovative lesson plan, students explore the power of social media in calling for change, while also improving their understanding of various cultures and social issues that impact other parts of the world. Video Introduction Lesson Plan Activity Rubric Inquiry-Based Research This great lesson has students practice online research skills by playing timed trivia games. Video Lesson Plan

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity. Lessons in English Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher's Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF. Lessons in Additional Languages Below is a list of lessons and resources in additional languages beyond English: Learn more To learn more visit the Classroom videos page of this website, where you can find links to information on:

Kids and Mobile Phones What age is appropriate for a kid to have a mobile phone? That's something for you and your family to decide. Consider your child’s age, personality, and maturity, and your family's circumstances. Is your child responsible enough to follow rules set by you and the school? When you decide your children are ready for a mobile phone, teach them to think about safety and responsibility. Phones, Features, and Options Decide on options and features for your kid's phone. Your mobile phone company and the phone itself should give you some choices for privacy settings and child safety controls. Be smart about smart phones. Many phones offer web access and mobile apps. Get familiar with social mapping. Many mobile phones now have GPS technology installed: kids with these phones can pinpoint where their friends are — and be pinpointed by their friends. Develop Cell Phone Rules Explain what you expect. Talk to your kids about when and where it's appropriate to use their cell phones. Set an example.

Marking/Users You can use CC-licensed materials as long as you follow the license conditions. One condition of all CC licenses is attribution. Here are some good (and not so good) examples of attribution. Note: If you want to learn how to mark your own material with a CC license go here. Examples of attribution Here is a photo. This is an ideal attribution Because: Title? Author? Source? License? This is a pretty good attribution Title? Author? Source? License? This is an incorrect attribution Photo: Creative Commons Title? Author? Source? License? This is a good attribution for material you modified slightly Title, Author, Source, and License are all noted Modification? This is a good attribution for material from which you created a derivative work Original Title, Author, Source, and License are all noted Derivative? New author of the derivative work is also noted Note: If you're at a point where you are licensing derivative works, go to Marking your work with a CC license. Title? Author? Source? License? 1.

netsmartz Click on the titles below to print age-appropriate activity cards. These activity cards are related to the online activities and easy to implement with few extra materials. Printable handouts are included. Primary (Ages 5-7) Bad Netiquette Stinks Students will learn the definition of netiquette and discuss the importance of having good manners online. Intermediate (Ages 8-10) Attitude Overdrive Students will watch the NSTeens video "Attitude Overdrive" and discuss what to do when they encounter "griefers" while playing games online.

Related: