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Digital Citizenship: Resource Roundup

Digital Citizenship: Resource Roundup
Related:  Digital CitizenshipDigital Footprint & Privacy, Literacy

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Working toward equal digital rights and supporting electronic access is the starting point of Digital Citizenship. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette

That's Not Cool Family Safety Center As a parent or guardian, you know what feels right for your family and how your kids learn best. To help your family navigate through new technologies, gadgets, and services in an ever-changing online world, it helps to get practical advice. That’s why we continuously talk to safety experts, parents, educators and communities around the world – to keep a pulse on what works. Together, we can help nurture a community of responsible digital citizens. {*style:<ul>*} {*style:<li>*} {*style:<h3>*} Family Link {*style:</h3>*} {*style:<br>*} With the Family Link app from Google, you can stay in the loop as your kid explores on their Android device. Family Link lets you create a Google Account for your kid that’s like your account, while also helping you set certain digital ground rules that work for your family.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like. Video Playlist: Teaching Digital Citizenship Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What is Digital Citizenship? More Resources for Learning About Digital Citizenship

How To Tackle Digital Citizenship During The First 5 Days Of School Digital citizenship is not a one time discussion. It is an ongoing process that needs to be taught to all grade levels and to all stakeholders. The problem is that things are changing so rapidly that it is difficult for everyone to keep up to date with the trends. Our students are like cowboys living in the wild wild west. Day One: Create An Acceptable Use Policy WITH Your Students – Give Them a Voice Every September we pass out the obligatory acceptable use policies with little thought to what they include. For this discussion, think about digital citizenship in general, at school, at home and in transit. Who is responsible for the technology or the device – what does that entail? Day Two:Discuss “Online Privacy” It is essential that we teach our students that NOTHING they do online is EVER private. Day Three:Personal Identity – Their Personal Brand and Reputation Students need to understand that everything they post becomes part of their “personal brand.” Day Four:Digital Communication

Google must respect 'right to be forgotten' Internet companies can be made to remove irrelevant or excessive personal information from search engine results, Europe's top court ruled on Tuesday in a case pitting privacy campaigners against Google. The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) upheld the complaint of a Spanish man who objected to the fact that Google searches on his name threw up links to a 1998 newspaper article about the repossession of his home. The case highlighted the struggle in cyberspace between free speech advocates and supporters of privacy rights who say people should have the "right to be forgotten" — meaning that they should be able to remove their digital traces from the internet. It creates both technical challenges and potential extra costs for companies like Google, the world's no.1 search engine, and Facebook. "We are very surprised that it differs so dramatically from the Advocate General's opinion and the warnings and consequences that he spelled out.

Media and Technology Resources for Educators February 27, 2014 We are thrilled to announce the release of our entire Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum as a set of eight interactive, multimedia iBooks Textbooks, available for free in the iBooks Store... read more March 31, 2014 Imagine … a school district that is teaching Digital Literacy and Citizenship lessons to 28,000 K-12 students, with 1,800 trained teachers. Categories:

Building Your Google Resume Last week I was asked to give a talk to our high school students about CyberSafety. A yearly talk to remind them about the Internet and their responsibility on it….or that’s how I view it anyway. I was given 5 minutes at an assembly….5 minutes to cover the whole topic of CyberSafety. So the question became how do I make an impact in 5 minutes? I decided that the best way to present what I wanted to say was to do a Pecha-Kucha. First, when given such a short time frame I wanted to make sure I didn’t get off track, go down a rabbit hole of my own thinking and never make the point. Talking about CyberSafety to high school students is a topic I always find difficult. First I knew I needed to establish a connection with them so my opening slide was this: Just the slide on the screen had the kids clapping, cheering and laughing. I simple said “Be Safe and know that everything is Public….does anyone have any questions?” All of this in 80 seconds (4 slides) to frame my real message of the day.

Digital Literacy Home Welcome to the Microsoft Digital Literacy curriculum. Whether you are new to computing or have some experience, Digital Literacy will help you develop a fundamental understanding of computers. The courses help you learn the essential skills to begin computing with confidence, be more productive at home and at work, stay safe online, use technology to complement your lifestyle, and consider careers where you can put your skills to work. Use the menu below to see the Digital Literacy curricula and courses available in your preferred language. After you select a language, click “go”, and the offers available will appear in a new dropdown box. The Microsoft Digital Literacy curriculum has three levels. The Basic curriculum features a course called A First Course Toward Digital Literacy. The Standard curriculum is available in four versions. Version 4 uses examples and simulations from Windows 8 and Microsoft Office 2013.

Trillion-Dollar Footprint (6-8) Warm-up (10 minutes) ASK:How many of you have … sent a message or posted a comment online?created a profile on a social network site? EXPLAIN that filling out a form, sending an email to a friend, posting a photo, and pretty much everything one does online – even the simple act of visiting a website or using a search engine – leaves a trail. Play Video (10 minutes) DEFINE the Key Vocabulary terms digital footprint and imagery. SHOW students the “The Digital Footprint” video. Lighthouse: Search engines and social network sites can reveal a lot about people. DEFINE the Key Vocabulary terms persistent and invisible audience. REVIEW with students the concept that all of the information about someone online makes up his or her digital footprint, and that this information can be searched; copied and passed on; seen by a large, invisible audience, and can become persistent. Pick a Host (25 minutes) ARRANGE students into groups of four and give each group one copy of the Choose a Host Student Handout.

Safe Connects | Net Literacy While 99% of all that happens on the net is positive and safe which is very similar to the real world, educating teens about Internet safety helps keep them safe and enables them to enjoy the riches available to them online. Safe Connects is differentiated from other Internet safety programs because students use “straight talk” to discuss topics that are important to teens. This program has established a “student-teaching-students-and-parents” model for school systems throughout America. Safe Connects Cyber Bullying PSA The Safe Connects online safety program is based on three premises: 1. 2. 3. Learn more about Safe Connects by clicking on the “What Is Safe Connects?”

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I think that this a fundamental part of using the new literacies in a classroom situation. Students (and adults) need to understand how the internet works as a community and is dependent on every person to act in a civil manner. by hermansenh Oct 28

Related:  CybersafetyDigital Citizenshipdigital citizenship