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Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
A readout module form the HERA-B silicon vertex detector. (Image courtesy of Dr Max on Flickr.) Graduates of MIT's electrical engineering and computer science department work in diverse industries and conduct research in a broad range of areas. They improve the stability and security of computers and communications networks, and they increase the efficiency of solar panels. They create unique algorithms to analyze financial markets and design robots capable of thinking like human beings. Our community members continually make breakthroughs that enable people to communicate more easily, manage their environments more effectively, and lead more comfortable lives than ever before. MIT has awarded electrical engineering degrees for nearly 130 years, and our educational programs have been at the cutting edge since their inception.

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SPU27x: Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science During each week of the course, you will watch as chefs reveal the secrets behind some of their most famous culinary creations — often right in their own restaurants. Inspired by such cooking mastery, the Harvard team will then explain, in simple and sophisticated ways, the science behind the recipe. Topics will include: soft matter materials, such as emulsions, illustrated by aioli; elasticity, exemplified by the done-ness of a steak; and diffusion, revealed by the phenomenon of spherification, the culinary technique pioneered by Ferran Adrià. To help you make the link between cooking and science, an “equation of the week” will capture the core scientific concept being explored. You will also have the opportunity to be an experimental scientist in your very own laboratory — your kitchen. By following along with the engaging recipe of the week, taking measurements, and making observations, you will learn to think both like a cook and a scientist.

www.columbia.edu/~sss31/rainbow/murphy.combat.html 1. If the enemy is in range, so are you. 2. Incoming fire has the right of way. 3. Don't look conspicuous, it draws fire. 4. There is always a way. 5. UC BerkeleyX: CS188.1x: Artificial Intelligence *Note - This is an Archived course* This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Main Content Art, Graphics, and Procedural Generation Designing Non-repeating Patterns with Prime NumbersLow-Complexity ArtRandom Psychedelic ArtSeam-carving for Content-Aware Image ScalingThe Cellular Automaton Method for Procedural Cave GenerationBezier Curves and PicassoMaking Hybrid Images Signal Processing CAPM Certification Ready to apply? Register and log in to get started. PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® is a valuable entry-level certification for project practitioners.

30 Best Quotes in Pictures of the Week – Aug 5th to Aug 11th 1. ”Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute, and it seems like an hour…..” – Albert Einstein 2. ”When you can’t smoke” – Rory Sutherland 3. ”Death does not concern us…” – Epicurus 4. ”I think it’s better to have ideas.” – Chris Rock 10 Reasons Python Rocks for Research (And a Few Reasons it Doesn’t) — Hoyt Koepke The following is an account of my own experience with Python. Because that experience has been so positive, it is an unabashed attempt to promote the use of Python for general scientific research and development. About four years ago, I dropped MATLAB in favor of Python as my primary language for coding research projects. This article is a personal account of how rewarding I have found that experience. As I describe in the next sections, the variety and quality of Python’s features has spoiled me. Even in small scripts, I now rely on Python’s numerous data structures, classes, nested functions, iterators, the flexible function calling syntax, an extensive kitchen-sink-included standard library, great scientific libraries, and outstanding documentation.

Programming Is Not Math « Sarah Mei When I learned to program, back when dinosaurs walked the earth and the internet had no cats, there was an idea: if you were good at math, you’d be good at programming. I was great at math as a kid, but perhaps because I didn’t like it much, no one steered me towards programming. I came to it accidentally, in college, when I took an elective programming class because it fit my schedule. So my first programming language was Fortran, an abbreviation of “Formula Translation.” As you might expect from the name, the projects in the class were exciting things like estimating the area under a curve using rectangles, like you see in the diagram below.

Intro to Statistics When does the course begin? This class is self paced. You can begin whenever you like and then follow your own pace.

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