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Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
A readout module form the HERA-B silicon vertex detector. (Image courtesy of Dr Max on Flickr.) Graduates of MIT's electrical engineering and computer science department work in diverse industries and conduct research in a broad range of areas. They improve the stability and security of computers and communications networks, and they increase the efficiency of solar panels. They create unique algorithms to analyze financial markets and design robots capable of thinking like human beings. Our community members continually make breakthroughs that enable people to communicate more easily, manage their environments more effectively, and lead more comfortable lives than ever before. MIT has awarded electrical engineering degrees for nearly 130 years, and our educational programs have been at the cutting edge since their inception.

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SPU27x: Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science During each week of the course, you will watch as chefs reveal the secrets behind some of their most famous culinary creations — often right in their own restaurants. Inspired by such cooking mastery, the Harvard team will then explain, in simple and sophisticated ways, the science behind the recipe. Topics will include: soft matter materials, such as emulsions, illustrated by aioli; elasticity, exemplified by the done-ness of a steak; and diffusion, revealed by the phenomenon of spherification, the culinary technique pioneered by Ferran Adrià. To help you make the link between cooking and science, an “equation of the week” will capture the core scientific concept being explored. You will also have the opportunity to be an experimental scientist in your very own laboratory — your kitchen. By following along with the engaging recipe of the week, taking measurements, and making observations, you will learn to think both like a cook and a scientist.

Programming resources Programming knowledge is not mandatory for LessWrong but computer science and programming is a popular topic among LessWrong members and it is also instrumentally useful to understand how computers work and how to program them. Even if you are not interested to learn to program, you might want to be able to at least interpret the most basic pseudo code as you might come across various snippets of code in discussions and top-level posts outside of the main sequences. Below you will find a list of links to books and other resources. Most categories are sorted by their difficulty in ascending order.

Notes on overcoming loneliness: Make fewer ‘friends’ Ten years ago we’d never heard of names like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp. And yet today, for many, they are modern pillars of daily communication. Social media has become an omnipresent host to our daily interactions with 72% of all internet users now active on some form of social media. We have an array of social media outlets to suit every kind of action, personality type and human expression- both newsworthy and banal – and our engagement online is increasingly unwavering; we send around 500 million tweets per day and spend on average around 15 hours and 33 minutes a month on Facebook, for example. Social media has revolutionised the way we disseminate and receive information. While there are benefits to this, how does it affect the way we communicate with each other, who we choose to interact with and most of all how we feel?

www.columbia.edu/~sss31/rainbow/murphy.combat.html 1. If the enemy is in range, so are you. 2. Incoming fire has the right of way. 3. Don't look conspicuous, it draws fire. 4. There is always a way. 5. UC BerkeleyX: CS188.1x: Artificial Intelligence *Note - This is an Archived course* This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. CAPM Certification Ready to apply? Register and log in to get started. PMI’s Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® is a valuable entry-level certification for project practitioners. Become a Programmer, Motherfucker If you don't know how to code, then you can learn even if you think you can't. Thousands of people have learned programming from these fine books: Learn Python The Hard Way Learn Ruby The Hard Way

30 Best Quotes in Pictures of the Week – Aug 5th to Aug 11th 1. ”Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute, and it seems like an hour…..” – Albert Einstein 2. ”When you can’t smoke” – Rory Sutherland 3. ”Death does not concern us…” – Epicurus 4. ”I think it’s better to have ideas.” – Chris Rock 10 Reasons Python Rocks for Research (And a Few Reasons it Doesn’t) — Hoyt Koepke The following is an account of my own experience with Python. Because that experience has been so positive, it is an unabashed attempt to promote the use of Python for general scientific research and development. About four years ago, I dropped MATLAB in favor of Python as my primary language for coding research projects. This article is a personal account of how rewarding I have found that experience. As I describe in the next sections, the variety and quality of Python’s features has spoiled me. Even in small scripts, I now rely on Python’s numerous data structures, classes, nested functions, iterators, the flexible function calling syntax, an extensive kitchen-sink-included standard library, great scientific libraries, and outstanding documentation.

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