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Think Again: How to Reason and Argue

Model Thinking This course will consist of twenty sections. As the course proceeds, I will fill in the descriptions of the topics and put in readings. Section 1: Introduction: Why Model? In these lectures, I describe some of the reasons why a person would want to take a modeling course. To be an intelligent citizen of the worldTo be a clearer thinkerTo understand and use dataTo better decide, strategize, and design There are two readings for this section. The Model Thinker: Prologue, Introduction and Chapter 1 Why Model? Section 2: Sorting and Peer Effects We now jump directly into some models. In this second section, I show a computational version of Schelling's Segregation Model using NetLogo. NetLogo The Schelling Model that I use can be found by clicking on the "File" tab, then going to "Models Library". The readings for this section include some brief notes on Schelling's model and then the academic papers of Granovetter and Miller and Page. Notes on Schelling Granovetter Model Miller and Page Model

How to learn math About This Course You can now register for the current offering of this course. If you are interested in Jo Boaler's "How to Learn Math: For Students" course, the course is available here: How to Learn Math: For Students This course offers important new research ideas on learning, the brain, and math that can transform students’ experiences with math. This course first ran last summer (June - Sep 2013) but will soon be re-opening and will run for an extended time, probably April-October. More than 40,000 people took the last class – mainly teachers, parents and school administrators. 95% of people completing the end of course survey said that they would change their teaching or ways of helping as a result of the course. An accompanying student intervention course will be offered in similar months in the 2013-14 school year (May/June) and through the summer. Concepts 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Prerequisites There are no prerequisites for this course. Course Staff Frequently Asked Questions No.

Listening to World Music About the Course With the click of a mouse, now more than ever we are able to access sounds made by people from all around the world. And yet, most of us don't listen to the wide diversity of music available to us, probably because it sounds so strange. This class will open up the world of music to you. We begin with a brief history of recording technology, the music industry and the place of world music in that narrative; you are introduced to keywords for talking about music cross-culturally; and then proceed to half a dozen musical cultures around the world. Course Syllabus Week One: Introductions with an overview of recording technology history and ties to world music and cultures; vocabulary for talking about world music and global cultural encounters, and a case study of “Chant,” the 1990s Gregorian chant recording that crossed over into the popular music market.Week Two: Graceland, Paul Simon's "collaborative" album. Recommended Background In-course Textbooks Suggested Readings

Critical Perspectives on Management This course is designed for students of all backgrounds who have an interest in how firms are governed, the forces that have helped define modern management practice, and the outcomes of that practice not only for the firm itself, but also for the societies in which they operate. For students who are thinking of a career in management, it may also prove useful as a basic introduction to some of the conceptual vocabulary and ideas behind modern theories of management. Using a wide disciplinary approach - from economics and history to social theory and even a smattering of biblical criticism - the course will invite students to consider several core management strategies and priorities from often unexpected perspectives in order to judge their success or failure. Topics include: the function of the firm; the role of incentive; the ways in which narrative forces shape decision making, and how market relationships define the managerial culture in ways that can lead to sub-optimal outcomes.

650 Free Online Courses from Top Universities Take online courses from the world's top universities for free. Below, you will find 1,500 online courses from universities like Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Oxford and more. You can use this collection of online courses to learn everything you want--from history, philosophy and literature, to physics, biology, psychology, and computer science. Note: This page includes a lot of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). If you want to enroll in a free version of a MOOC, please select the "Full Course, No Certificate" (edX) or "Audit" (Coursera) option. If you opt to take the course for a certificate/credential, you will be charged a fee, and we will receive a commission from our affiliate partners--Coursera, FutureLearn and edX. Humanities & Social Sciences Art & Art History Courses Italian Renaissance - Free Online Course - Dr. Classics Courses Communication Courses Economics & Finance Courses Bookmark our collection of free online courses in Economics. Education Courses Film Courses Food Courses

Mind Tools - Career Training The Modern and the Postmodern In this course we shall examine how the idea of "the modern" develops at the end of the 18th century in European intellectual history, and how being modern (or progressive, or hip) became one of the crucial criteria for understanding and evaluating cultural change during the last two hundred years in the West. We shall be concerned with the relations between culture and historical change, and our materials shall be drawn from a variety of areas: philosophy, the novel, and critical theory. Finally, we shall try to determine what it means to be modern today, and whether it makes sense to go beyond the modern to the postmodern. The Modern and the Postmodern traces the intertwining of the idea of modernity with the idea of art or culture from the late 18th century until the present. Beginning with the Enlightenment, Western cultures have invested heavily in the notion that the world can be made more of a home for human beings through the development of culture (and technology).

AIDS About the Course Did you grow up in a world without red ribbons, AZT, the AIDS Memorial Quilt, or Project Red? If you did, chances are good that you came of age before 1981 and are a member of the last generation of humans on this planet to be able to say that you remember those ‘carefree days when all you had to worry about was getting pregnant, herpes, and a bad reputation’ (AID Atlanta). On June 5, 1981 the CDC released a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report describing the first five cases of what later became known as the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. On that day human history broke into two generations: Those who can remember a time before the AIDS pandemic and those who can't. No matter what generation you grew up in, what we all have in common is a curiosity about AIDS. All of this and more will be covered in AIDS. Course Syllabus Lectures: Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Recommended Background In-course Textbooks Suggested Readings Course Format No.

Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy This course introduces the major substantive themes in environmental law and gives students insight and experience with critical thinking about these themes. Students will demonstrate mastery by learning how past environmental disputes have been resolved, and by applying insights and critical-thinking skills from past disputes to predicting how future ones might be addressed, including future disputes involving climate change. As a student enrolled in this course, you will have free access to selected chapters and content for the duration of the course. All chapters were selected by the instructor specifically for this course. You will be able to access the Coursera edition of the e-textbook via an e-reader in the class site hosted by Chegg.

9 Daily Habits That Will Make You Happier Happiness is the only true measure of personal success. Making other people happy is the highest expression of success, but it's almost impossible to make others happy if you're not happy yourself. With that in mind, here are nine small changes that you can make to your daily routine that, if you're like most people, will immediately increase the amount of happiness in your life: 1. If there's any big truth about life, it's that it usually lives up to (or down to) your expectations. 2. The most common source of stress is the perception that you've got too much work to do. 3. I'm not talking about a formal, wrapped-up present. 4. Arguments about politics and religion never have a "right" answer but they definitely get people all riled up over things they can't control. 5. Since you can't read minds, you don't really know the "why" behind the "what" that people do. 6. Sometimes we can't avoid scarfing something quick to keep us up and running. 7. 8. 9.

300 Free MOOCs from Great Universities (Many Offering Certificates) Discover Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) from great universities. Most offer "certificates" or "statements of completion," though typically not university credit. A "$" indicates that the course is free, but the credential costs money. (See the key below to understand the credentials offered by each course, and see our MOOC FAQ if you have general questions.) Courses are arranged by start date, while evergreen courses, which can begin whenever you wish, are found at the bottom. Free Courses Credential Key CC = Certificate of Completion CA = Certificate of Accomplishment HCC - Honor Code Certificate VC$ = Verified Certificate VCA$ = Verified Certificate of Accomplishment SA = Statement of Accomplishment SP$ = Statement of Participation CM = Certificate of Mastery NI - No Information About Certificate Available NC = No Certificate June 2020

Brain Pickings Probabilistic Graphical Models About the Course What are Probabilistic Graphical Models? Uncertainty is unavoidable in real-world applications: we can almost never predict with certainty what will happen in the future, and even in the present and the past, many important aspects of the world are not observed with certainty. Probability theory gives us the basic foundation to model our beliefs about the different possible states of the world, and to update these beliefs as new evidence is obtained. In this class, you will learn the basics of the PGM representation and how to construct them, using both human knowledge and machine learning techniques; you will also learn algorithms for using a PGM to reach conclusions about the world from limited and noisy evidence, and for making good decisions under uncertainty. Course Syllabus Topics covered include: There will be short weekly review quizzes and programming assignments (Octave/Matlab) focusing on case studies and applications of PGMs to real-world problems:

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