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Epic Reads: Young Adult Books & Books for Teens

Epic Reads: Young Adult Books & Books for Teens

http://www.epicreads.com/

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The Ultimate YA Bookshelf YALSA's Ultimate Teen Bookshelf (PDF) highlights must-have teen materials for libraries. The Ultimate Teen Bookshelf, with titles listed on this webpage and as a PDF download, was developed in conjunction with the United We Serve initiative. The list includes 50 books, five magazines and five audio books. Subscribers to the YALSA-BK electronic discussion list suggested titles for the Ultimate Teen Bookshelf, which were vetted by Pam Spencer Holley, former YALSA president and author of Quick and Popular Reads for Teens (ALA Editions, 2009), and Judy Sasges, district manager for Sno-Isle Libraries in Marysville, Wash., a 2002 Printz Award committee member and a 2010 YALSA Nonfiction Award committee member. Open Circle Names 25 Best Books for Kids’ Social and Emotional Learning To celebrate its 25th anniversary, the Open Circle Program at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), a provider of evidence-based social and emotional learning for K–5 kids, has released its list of the top 25 children’s books that connect to kids’ social and emotional development. The chosen books cover a range of important skills, such as self-awareness, self-management, empathy, dealing with conflict, and problem-solving. The Hundred Dresses, by Eleanor Estes, tops the list. “Of the countless books that teachers use to shed light on such issues as friendship, inclusion, empathy, problem solving, or understanding differences, some titles stand out for being especially authentic and memorable,” Open Circle says in its announcement. “Like good friends, the books on this list are potential sources of comfort, validation, laughter, surprises, and new perspectives for children.” 1.

My Name Is Not Bob: Best Blogs for Writers to Read in 2013 Once again, it's that time of year. Every February, I reveal my personal list of the best blogs for writers to read. These are personal faves, so I won't be offended if you know a great blog I didn't list. Please share it in the comments below, and I will review it for next year's list. By the way, this year's list offers more than 50 blogs. In 2011, I listed 31 wonderful blogs for writers; in 2012, I listed 39 great blogs for writers; this year, the final count is 55. The Show Me Librarian: Selection is Privilege There is a conversation happening on the Storytime Underground Facebook Group right now. It’s been going on for a few days, actually, and it seems to have started innocuously enough: with a question about folks’ thoughts on the Youth Media Award winners, asked by a person who expressed “major shock” and disappointment (via frown-y face emoticons) about one of the Caldecott honors. As I said; innocuously enough. Some folks who added to the thread brought up the perennial gripe that not all the recognized titles seem to have much kid appeal; other voices jumped in to clarify that kid appeal is not part of the criteria for any of the major YMAs awarded by ALSC and YALSA. I find this argument annoying the same way I do a mosquito bite, because it pops up every year around the same time and is irritating but will disappear in a week.

15 Online Tools for Students and Teachers to Create Presentations Online learning solutions like those offered by Creedo allow instructors to pose questions to students and instantly evaluate results. If presentations are not done right, they could lead to boring, mind wandering time wasters, where the message doesn’t really get through properly. But, help is available in the form of great online tools that’ll help you create engaging presentations, whether you’re a student or a teacher. Keep their attention, get your message across, and dazzle them with eye catching presentations using these online resources. The Inspiring Stories Behind 15 Classic Novels  According to Jack London, "You can't wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club." London himself took the inspiration for The Call of the Wild (1903) from his time spent living in Canada and Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush when high-quality sled dogs -- like those that feature in the book -- were in impossibly high demand. The stories and inspirations behind fifteen more of literature's most memorable titles are explained here: Anna Karenina (1877), Leo Tolstoy In January 1872, the death of a 35-year-old woman was reported in the Russian press: smartly dressed and carrying a bag containing a change of clothes, the girl had thrown herself under a freight train at Yasenki Station outside Moscow.

7 Ways Video Games Will Help Your Kids in School The first video games were not designed with education in mind. Pong, Mario Brothers, Sonic the Hedgehog and Street Fighter didn’t help anyone learn algebra, practice vocabulary, or memorize details of Ancient Roman history, but they were fun. Because of their entertaining nature, video games developed a bad rap over the years for “rotting kids’ brains” or distracting them from more studious pursuits. Fortunately, we know now that playing video games is far from a waste of time. A number of recent studies have indicated that video games, even violent ones, can help kids develop essential emotional and intellectual skills that support academic achievement. These findings led many innovative teachers around the globe to recognize the benefits of gaming and include game-based learning in their curricula.

Live Worksheets Maker - Getting started guide Making interactive worksheets is very easy with ourLive Worksheets MakerTry it now!! Getting started guide 1. Open the Live Worksheets Maker and upload your worksheet Session 227: How to get Children Reading for Pleasure One major challenge for some pupils, it would appear, is getting them to read for pleasure, especially with the many distractions modern society throws at them. Other children love losing themselves in to books, getting lost in their own imaginations as they progress through the stories. This UKEdChat session explored how teachers encourage children to read for pleasure, looking at strategies that work in all educational settings. The questions explored during the session asked: The media regularly reports on issues with literacy in the UK. What are your biggest challenges with getting children to read?

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