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Creat a Character Exercises

Creat a Character Exercises
Getting to Know your Characters Create a character or get to know him better with these creative writing exercises. Well written characters engage the reader and make him feel as though he has made a new friend. 1. Read! 2. 3. 4. 5. How do different people show that they are bored; how do they disguise it? 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Setting ExercisesCreative Writing Exercises Related:  Fiction Writing

Creating an Original Character By Maisha Foster-O'Neal You've heard the old maxim before... 'a character can make or break your story.' Okay, okay, so you want to write an interesting character. You've got some plot ideas, you know a little bit about your world, but now you need your characters. And not just any old characters - no, these have got to be the most original, most interesting characters your reader will ever come across. Ah yes, such is the desire of all writers. Enough already! Before we dive into Creating Original Characters, I'd like to offer a disclaimer. Disclaimer: I don't claim to know everything about writing. Note: There is already an excellent tutorial about writing the Villain, so I won't make specific references to writing an antagonist. The Basics of Characters The first thing about characters - They are just one facet of a good story. Character Creation: Little Exercises Open up a phonebook and pick out a name, and write a description of that person based only on their name. A note on Romance

Third Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft Enrollment Limited Sherry Wilson's step-by-step method helped me organize my thoughts and transform a simple idea into a full-fledged plot. Without her help and guidance, I'd still be walking around with just another "great idea for a story." Thanks to Sherry, though, I've published three novels and know there are more on the way! ~ Debi Faulkner, Summoning, LilyPad Princess and Murphy's Law "Sherry is extremely professional and knowledgeable in this field. As well as being technically proficient in many styles, she also possesses a rich imagination, offering suggestions and alternatives in a way that doesn't impose on the writer's own style. Her observations are honest and valuable, beyond what many others can give. A. "WOW! I really appreciate the work you've done so far. --Lena Jones "Sherry Wilson has a deep understanding of the craft of writing and a natural gift for the art of writing. Being an editor myself, there are not too many people I would trust with my own work.

Character Chart for Fiction Writers - EpiGuide.com If you're a fiction writer -- whether you're working on a novel, short story, screenplay, television series, play, web series, webserial, or blog-based fiction -- your characters should come alive for your reader or audience. The highly detailed chart below will help writers develop fictional characters who are believable, captivating, and unique. Print this page to complete the form for each main character you create. IMPORTANT: Note that all fields are optional and should be used simply as a guide; character charts should inspire you to think about your character in new ways, rather than constrain your writing. If this character chart is helpful, please let us know! Looking for more character questionnaires / charts? First Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft When you tell a story through a viewpoint character using I or we, you are using first person point of view. Example: The banging on my door reverberated within my skull like a giant church bell in an empty hall. I groaned and rolled onto my stomach, pulling the pillow over my head. Every detail of your story must be filtered through the storyteller. This impacts your choice of narrator—it may be, and most often is, your main character. If your main character cannot see, hear, touch, smell, taste, think, know or feel it, you can’t include it. First person point of view is the most reader friendly. This can be a comfortable point of view as it allows the writer to get right into the character’s head; however, beginners often find first person challenging because you really need to understand your character and his role. The most common problem when using first person POV is that it is difficult to resist the urge to tell the reader everything rather than show it. Considerations:

Overcome Writer's Block, Suggestions To Get You Writing Again. ^ Back to top We use cookies, just to track visits to our website, we store no personal details. ACCEPT COOKIES What are cookies? Login Overcoming Writer’s Block Writer’s Block can stop your creative efforts in their tracks and overcoming writer’s block is a tough task. Share: start Save Punch a key to Break the block Dial 1 for Settings Dial 2 for Characters Dial 3 for Dramatic Entrances Dial 4 for Dialogue Dial 5 to Commiserate Dial 6 for Verbs Dial 7 for Calisthenics Dial 8 to Kill a Character Dial 9 for Endings Dial 0 for More Help Think you can do better? Dial for your Saved Tips to Start Writing Toggle Sound The September Challenge: Every End Has a Beginning is now OPEN to submissions The Winner of the August Challenge: Read it Well, is... The Truth by Ernest_Lee The following six are this month's runners up: • I'm Not Crazy by JedAnderson • Space Robot Five by Sprayoncrayon • The Paranoid Pair by Josafat •• Chilli Cheese Dogs by FinneanNilsen • Let Me Count the Ways by lightningpastry • Our judges said:

Omniscient Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft Basically, omniscient point of view means that the story is told from an all-seeing God-like, omnipotent viewpoint. You would use third person pronouns in the writing, but you can choose to dip into the head of any of the characters and reveal things that have occurred in the past or will happen in the future. This was once a very popular method of storytelling. It is less so now, especially in the North American market. Still there are some cases where this can add extra dimension to your writing when done well. The trouble is that each character must have a distinctive voice so that the reader is never at a loss as to whose head he is in at the moment. Limited Omniscient Viewpoint As I mentioned, true omniscient viewpoint is very rare, but limited omniscient is often useful for modern writers. Limited omniscient basically means that while you have a God-like perspective of the story, you limit yourself to being in one character’s head at a time. Considerations

Finding your voice - making your writing sound like YOU Finding your voice by Christopher Meeks Developing a voice in your writing is a notion that passes over me every now and then like the "thung" sound of an error message on my computer. "I should develop a voice," I think. To some people, the image of "voice" may be akin to a rotund person belting something out in Italian in front of a lot of penguin-suited people paying big bucks waiting for the crystal to shatter. Or, if that metaphor's a bit too extreme, think of "voice" as simply like your own voice. A voice on the Web: Strive to create a "text" voice that is as distinctive as your speaking voice.We can't all be Hemingway: Don't try to write like someone else; find your own voice and don't try to change your demeanor.Write like you talk: It really can be that simple.Let your passion be your guide: Follow the urge; follow the idea.Let me entertain you: All writing, even the most serious, is a form of entertainment. I can recognize voice in other people's work. How do we do that? Boom.

Point of View in Literature -- Perspectives — The Writer’s Craft In order to fully understand point of view in literature, we need to explore the different perspectives from which a story may be told. Bear in mind that the Perspective is the scene as viewed through the eyes/mind of the chosen character. The story, however, can be told from any one of several points-of-view regardless of the perspective chosen. Single Major Character Viewpoint The story can be told from first, second or third person POV but it is told throughout by just one character. The single-character perspective is the most common viewpoint used in children’s literature and a lot of adult literature as well. Minor Character Viewpoint Again the story can be told from the first, second or third person POV. This method isn’t chosen very often in modern literature, but can be used to good effect in literary works where you need to keep some distance to really see what is happening. Omniscient Viewpoint This was once a very popular method of storytelling. Multiple Viewpoints

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