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21st Century Teacher

21st Century Teacher
We have heard alot about the 21st Century Learner. We know that they are:collaborativeadaptiveinformation, media and technology savvycommunicatorsimmediate and instantrequire instant gratificationcreators and adaptorBut what about the 21st Century Teacher, what are the characteristics we would expect to see in a 21st Century Educator. We know they are student centric, holistic, they are teaching about how to learn as much as teaching about the subject area. We know too, that they must be 21st Century learners as well. But teachers are more than this The 21st Century teacher is an adaptor. Harnessed as we are to an assessment focused education model the 21st Century Educator must be able to adapt the curriculum and the requirements to teach to the curriculum in imaginative ways. We expect our students to be life long learners. For their advice and feedback Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach, Rod Fee, Kim Cofino, Doug DeKock, David Truss

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International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame Back to HOF 1997 Peter Jarvis, internationally known as a scholar and a speaker in the field of adult and continuing education, is currently Professor of Continuing Education at the University of Surrey, UK, and honorary Adjunct Professor in Adult Education at the University of Georgia, USA. He holds a B.D. degree from the University of London, a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Sheffield, a M.Soc.Sc. degree from the University of Birmingham, and a Ph.D. from the University of Aston. Among his numerous honors include the Cyril O. Houle World Award for Literature in Adult Education from the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education (1988) and the Medal of the University of Helsinki (1994). Weekly Reflection: What is 21st century assessment? North and South magazine We hear a lot about 21st century learning in education. About how computers are going to revolutionize and personalize teaching and learning. In fact there’s even been a government inquiry into digital learning yet the elephant in the room is assessment. Last month North and South ran an article boldly stating that kids needed to take more control in the classroom from those pesky know it all teachers.

The 27 Characteristics of A 21st Century Teacher "21st Century Educator" is probably the most popular buzzword in today's education. There is a growing and heated debate whether or not to label educators as 21st century and each camp has its own concept and arguments, however, for me personally I see teaching in 21st century as having undergone a paradigmatic shift. This is basically due to the emerging of the " social web" and the huge embrace of technology and particularly the mobile gadgetry in our classrooms. It would be unfair to ignore these huge transformations and their impact on education.

Alan November - Education Technology Consultant Alan thrives on confirming and challenging educators’ thoughts about what’s possible in the world of teaching and learning. More than anything, he is a teacher at heart, with a wealth of experience teaching learners of all ages. Alan November is an international leader in education technology. He began his career as an oceanography teacher and dorm counselor at an island reform school for boys in Boston Harbor. Humanistic approaches to learning Humanistic "theories" of learning tend to be highly value-driven and hence more like prescriptions (about what ought to happen) rather than descriptions (of what does happen). They emphasise the "natural desire" of everyone to learn. Whether this natural desire is to learn whatever it is you are teaching, however, is not clear. It follows from this, they maintain, that learners need to be empowered and to have control over the learning process. So the teacher relinquishes a great deal of authority and becomes a facilitator.

What are learning skills? The 21st century learning skills are often called the 4 C’s: critical thinking, creative thinking, communicating, and collaborating. These skills help students learn, and so they are vital to success in school and beyond. Critical Thinking

Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling Digital storytelling at its most basic core is the practice of using computer-based tools to tell stories. There are a wealth of other terms used to describe this practice, such as digital documentaries, computer-based narratives, digital essays, electronic memoirs, interactive storytelling, etc.; but in general, they all revolve around the idea of combining the art of telling stories with a variety of multimedia, including graphics, audio, video, and Web publishing. As with traditional storytelling, most digital stories focus on a specific topic and contain a particular point of view.

Instructional Technology - Region 10 Website Videoconference Services Videoconferencing Services Videoconference Bridging Content Capture, Archival and Streaming Video Scheduling and Help Desk Field Services and Support Training and Consulting Desktop / Device-based Videoconference services Requirements and Fees Professional Development Professional Development Experiential Learning Rogers distinguished two types of learning: cognitive (meaningless) and experiential (significant). The former corresponds to academic knowledge such as learning vocabulary or multiplication tables and the latter refers to applied knowledge such as learning about engines in order to repair a car. The key to the distinction is that experiential learning addresses the needs and wants of the learner. Rogers lists these qualities of experiential learning: personal involvement, self-initiated, evaluated by learner, and pervasive effects on learner. To Rogers, experiential learning is equivalent to personal change and growth. Rogers feels that all human beings have a natural propensity to learn; the role of the teacher is to facilitate such learning.

To what extent does Bloom’s taxonomy actually apply to foreign language teaching and learning? Bloom’s taxonomy of higher order thinking skills has acquired a mythological status, amongst educators. It is one of those reference frameworks that teachers adhere to with some sort of blind allegiance and which, in 25 years of teaching, I have never heard anyone question or criticize. Yet, it is far from perfect and, as I intend to argue in this article, there are serious issues undermining its validity, both with its theoretical premises and its practical implementation in MFL curriculum planning and lesson evaluation in school settings. Why should we be ‘wary’ of the Bloom taxonomy, as the ‘alarmist’ title of this article implies? Mainly because people forget or fail to consider that the Bloom Taxonomy was not meant as an evaluative tool and does not purport to measure ‘effective teaching’. In fact, the book in which the higher order thinking skills taxonomy was published is entitled: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals.

Get Started with Digital Storytelling Implement this exciting process in your classroom While the art of storytelling has been around for thousands of years, the advent of personal computers and approachable communication technologies has allowed storytellers to “go digital.” In 1994, Dana Atchley and Joe Lambert at the Center for Digital Storytelling began teaching others to craft digital stories, and the digital storytelling movement was born. Educational Technology Visit the links below for more information about the work of Texas Education Agency's Educational Technology unit in the Division of Instructional Materials and Educational Technology and statewide educational technology initiatives. Technology Planning and Funding Long-Range Plan for Technology, 2006-2020 2014 Progress Report on the Long-Range Plan for Technology (PDF) School Technology Planning, E-Rate Modernization, and Broadband ConnectivityE-Rate in TexasOnline Technology Plan (ePlan)School Technology and Readiness (STaR) ChartStudy on School District Network Capabilities (TEC Sec. 32.005)Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title II, Part D (outside source) Online Professional Development, Tools and ResourcesInternet Safety Project Share Texas Education on iTunes U Texas SUCCESS Initiative

621 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING THEORY Folks: The posting below gives a brief summary of transformative learning theory, an important educational development of the last decade. It is from CHAPTER 4: Evidence of the Transformational Dimensions of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Faculty Development Through the Eyes of SoTL Scholars, by Connie M. Schroeder, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, in To Improve the Academy, Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, Sandra Chadwick-Blossey, editor, Rollins College and Douglas Reimondo Robertson, associate editor, Eastern Kentucky University.

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