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The Shapes of CSS

The Shapes of CSS
Learn Development at Frontend Masters CSS is capable of making all sorts of shapes. Squares and rectangles are easy, as they are the natural shapes of the web. Add a width and height and you have the exact size rectangle you need. Add border-radius and you can round that shape, and enough of it you can turn those rectangles into circles and ovals. We also get the ::before and ::after pseudo elements in CSS, which give us the potential of two more shapes we can add to the original element. Square Rectangle Circle Oval Triangle Up Triangle Down Triangle Left Triangle Right Triangle Top Left Triangle Top Right Triangle Bottom Left Triangle Bottom Right Curved Tail Arrow via Ando Razafimandimby Trapezoid Parallelogram Star (6-points) Star (5-points) via Kit MacAllister Pentagon Hexagon Octagon Heart via Nicolas Gallagher Infinity via Nicolas Gallagher Diamond Square via Joseph Silber Diamond Shield via Joseph Silber Diamond Narrow via Joseph Silber Cut Diamond via Alexander Futekov Egg Pac-Man Talk Bubble TV Screen Lock

https://css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS/

Separation, Abstraction, and Cascading in CSS TLDR: LESS and Sass (and similar solutions) have saved CSS for three reasons: separation, abstraction, and cascading. While I welcome them, CSS still has other problems which I believe can be solved. I propose some solutions. Introduction A lot is said about LESS and Sass, and for good reason. Are We Taking CSS Too Far? CSS is a remarkable technology, capable of doing things that I wouldn’t have even dreamed of when I was first introduced to it. And, with added support for rounded corners, box shadows, text shadows, rotation and a wide range of other possibilities, web designers and developers can accomplish all sorts of amazing things when it comes to applying a design to a website. But are we starting to take things too far? The design community is awash with all kinds of different “CSS experiments” where people attempt to do some pretty incredible stuff (and quite often succeed). In an article I wrote for Six Revisions a couple months ago, I listed five of the experiments that I found really interesting: Each of these experiments takes a different approach.

JavaScript Garden Function Declarations and Expressions Functions in JavaScript are first class objects. That means they can be passed around like any other value. CSS3 Patterns Gallery Browser support The patterns themselves should work on Firefox 3.6+, Chrome, Safari 5.1, Opera 11.10+ and IE10+. However, implementation limitations might cause some of them to not be displayed correctly even on those browsers (for example at the time of writing, Gecko is quite buggy with radial gradients). Also, this gallery won’t work in Firefox 3.6 and IE10, even though they support gradients, due to a JavaScript limitation. Making a SVG HTML Burger Button Note: works in safari, chrome, firefox (mask opacity is iffy) Hamburger buttons are used to symbolify hidden menus all across the world, but when I came across this pretty awesome transition of a hamburger button by CreativeDash, I challenged myself with recreating it HTML. First thoughts. Having never worked with animating SVG before I had a couple of ideas of how I wanted to approach the animated path.

All you need to know about CSS Transitions CSS3 transitions bring simple and elegant animations to web applications, but there’s a lot more to the spec than first meets the eye. In this post I’m going to delve into some of the more complicated parts of CSS transitions, from chaining and events to hardware acceleration and animation functions. Letting the browser control animations sequences allows it to optimize performance and efficiency by altering the frame rate, minimizing paints and offloading some of the work to the GPU. Browser support CSS transitions are supported in practically every version of Firefox, Safari and Chrome. They’re supported in IE 10 and onwards. How To Use @font-face In CSS And 21 Great Typefaces The 2 most popular typefaces used on the web today are surely Verdana and Georgia. They’re great and I used them all the time since they’re web-safe fonts. I use them mostly because I’m not a big fan of flash replacement techniques or solutions that require Javascript (sIFR, Cufon, etc…). But what about the @font-face CSS property? While @font-face may not work in all browsers, I think it’s still one of the best solution available today.

HTML and CSS Validation: Should You Validate Your Web Page? Should You Validate Your Web Page? by Christopher Heng, thesitewizard.com Whether you design your web page using a visual web editor like Dreamweaver or KompoZer, or you code HTML directly with a simple text editor, the generally recommended practice is to validate it after you finish designing it. This article discusses what validation means, points you to some of the free tools that you can use, and deals with its limitations and the problems that a new webmaster may face. Note: if you are not sure what HTML and CSS mean, please read What are HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and Perl? Do I Need to Learn Them to Create a Website?

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