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Mobile Learning Lesson Plans

Mobile Learning Lesson Plans
Try the lesson plans below to bring the power of mobile learning into your classroom! Share your own successes and challenges in teaching with cell phones by emailing us at instructor@scholastic.com. Lesson Plan 2: Local History Scavenger Hunt Students will work in groups to complete a mobile scavenger hunt on local history. The students will travel to find clues, collect images, and complete challenges at the clue locations. Lesson Plan 4: Geometry Digital Blogging Books Students will use their cell phones to record their observations about geometric shapes in their everyday lives and put them onto a Web log. They will use their cell phones to capture both images and audio.

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Learning to Go! Learning to Go is a collection of lesson plans and tips for teachers wishing to incorporate mobile devices, phones or BYOT (Bring Your Own Technology) into their teaching. Written by the unstoppable Shelly Sanchez, this promises to be a very practical and useful guide for teachers interested in edtech. But perhaps most interesting of all is the design of the book. There are no page numbers, and the journey through it might not be a linear one.

BYOT: No Internet Access, No Problem Posted by Shelly Terrell on Wednesday, April 3rd 2013 Part of the Mobile Learning Series! “The principle goal of education in schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” ~ Jean Piaget I have been traveling throughout Slovenia and Croatia for the past month training teachers in integrating Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) effectively with their classes.

Pictures, Polls and Videos: How to Use Mobile Phones for Learning Digital Tools Teaching Strategies Kids are using Instagram and Twitter in their daily lives outside of school, so why not let them use it for class studies too? This is just one example of many featured in this second episode of Infinite Thinking Machine, a Web TV show for teachers produced by Computer Using Educators (CUE), which shows how to use students’ mobile devices in school. Examples like quick class polling to gauge student understanding using Poll Everywhere, Text the Mob and Wiffitti; creating instructional videos on sites like Educreations. For this episode, CUE asked yours truly to do a segment on how educators use Google Chats and video conferencing, and you’ll see some of those examples, as well. 18 Enlightening iPad Experiments in Education You know from experience that when you enjoy a subject, learning about that subject is easier, more fun, and you retain the information longer. Getting kids to enjoy learning is more productive to education efforts than spending more money, lengthening school days, you name it. This is the reason many educators are excited about the possibilities inherent to the iPad. More than 600 school districts in America have brought iPads into the classroom.

Digital Scavenger Hunts If you’ve got a smartphone or a tablet in your classroom, you’re ready for the adventure to begin! By adventure I mean, of course, the world of active learning through digital scavenger hunts. In this hunt, students are tasked with finding a particular physical object, person, or place and have to use technology to track it down. eltchat [licensed for non-commercial use only] / How do you use mobile devices in the classroom Tips, apps, best practices ELT Chat Summary - 30th April How do you use mobile devices in the classroom? Tips, apps & best practices Introduction This was the initial question for the evening's discussion, although there was some debate about the definition of mobile devices.

Once Upon a Device: 20 Reading Activities & Apps “Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.” – John Locke Epiphany is one of my favorite words. I remember discovering the word in high school and thinking that finally I had the right word to describe the “aha” moments I would get after reading a good book. I want my learners to have several epiphanies throughout their learning journeys. Ways to Evaluate Educational Apps I am conducting a series of workshops in Florida and was asked to share a rubric to help teachers evaluate educational apps as part of the workshop. In 2010 Harry Walker developed a rubric, and I used his rubric (with some modifications by Kathy Schrock) as the basis for mine. (Read Harry Walker's paper Evaluating the Effectiveness of Apps for Mobile Devices.) I kept in mind that some apps are used to practice a discrete skill or present information just one time.

10 Open Source Tools There’s a pantload of premium products available to teachers right now. If you’re willing to pay a little (or a lot) then you can have professional-grade products. But what if you don’t need the ultra-fancy version? What if you just need to do a quick task and then move on? Then you’re probably better off with one of these open source tools that costs you nothing and has a strong community behind it. For example, WordPress (which powers Edudemic!)

 Archive  I wanted to take a closer look at the iPad Evaluation I previously blogged about in Evaluating Apps with Transformative Use in Mind. The section of Content and Components deserved a closer look and explanation. You can download the PDF file of the iPad App Evaluation for the Classroom with the following sections of evaluation included: ConsiderationsContent & ComponentsLogisticsFluencySubstitution vs Transformation Model (based on SAMR model of Ruben Puentedura and Alan November‘s work)Evidence of Learning (based on conversation with Stephen Wilmarth) After looking at iPad apps through the lens of Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, November’s Digital Learning Farm, 21st century Upgrades, let’s take a closer look at the content and components of these apps. It is important to remind ourselves that shiny visuals and audio not automatically translate into pedagogical value of the program.

Mobile English By Nicky Hockly and Gavin Dudeney Technical wizards Nicky Hockly and Gavin Dudeney present a series of lesson plans on using mobile phones in class, suitable for any device from the most basic phone to the latest smartphone. Mobile English: Ideal phonePrint out the images of the old-fashioned mobile phone and modern smartphone located in the file in the top-right corner of the page. Alternatively, you can find Creative Commons licensed images by searching in Flickr.ProcedureAn introduction to mobile learningAs an accompaniment to their Mobile English series, Nicky Hockly and Gavin Dudeney provide an informative overview of mobile and handheld learning.Mobile English: Mobile phone dictationA short activity that can be used as a warmer or filler to review language that has already been covered in class.

What it Takes to Launch a Mobile Learning Program in Schools A successful mobile learning initiative requires a thorough analysis of the capacity of the existing technological infrastructure, with careful consideration and planning for the demands of the new program, including broadband access, hardware and software, and technical support. This analysis should include projections of demand and a review of recommendations for broadband requirements based on the number of users and bandwidth needs. Ideally, wireless connectivity should be available throughout a school campus to maximize the potential of mobile learning. The increase in usage will require additional data storage, possibly off-site.

70+ Tools in Bloom's Digital Taxonomy The number of web tools currently available to teachers, administrators, and students is downright absurd. You can’t swing an iPad without hitting a free web tool looking to revolutionize your classroom. Luckily, there are a few brave souls out in the world wide web attempting to organize the chaos a bit. We like to take our best shot here at Edudemic but also like to showcase some of the great organizing done by others. One of those fabulous organizers is Phillippa Cleaves ( @pipcleaves – worth following!)

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